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Full text of "History of Northeast Indiana : LaGrange, Steuben, Noble and DeKalb Counties"

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HISTORY 
Of 

NORTHEAST INDI A NA 

Lagrange, steuben, noble and 
Dekalb counties 



Under the Editorial Supervision o( 

IRA FORD 

LaGrange County 

ORVILLE STEVENS 

Steuben County 

WILLIAM H. McEWEN 

Noble County 

WILLIAM H. McINTOSH 

DeKalb County 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Chicago and New York 
1920 



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i 11 



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1339775 

History of Northeast Indiana 



Lewis Oscar Bullock is one of the oldest resi- 
dents of Milford Township in LaGrange County, 
having been in this locality over sixty-six years, 
and is proprietor of a fine farm 2j4 miles north and 
two miles west of South Milford. 

Mr. Bullock is a lineal descendant of the Pilgrims 
that landed at Plymouth Rock December 20, 1620. 
He was born in the Town of Middleport, Western 
New York, August 16, 1842, a son of Israel Lewis 
and Thalia Eunice (Bullock) Bullock. His maternal 
grandfather, William Bullock, was born in Vermont 
in 1755, and was a Green Mountain volunteer of 
1777 in the Revolutionary war. He was with Wash- 
ington at Valley Forge during the winter season, 
and suffered all the terrible hardships of that period. 
The paternal grandfather of Lewis O. Bullock, Israel 
Bullock, was born in Connecticut, and grew to man- 
hood, raised his family of six children and died there 
in 1812. Israel L. Bullock was a native of Connecti- 
cut, born in 1802, the youngest of his parents' chil- 
dren, and was ten years old when his father died. 
As the family were in poor circumstances he was 
bound out until he was twenty-one years old. His 
wife was a native of Otsego County, New York, 
born in 1804. They were married in 1831, and lived 
at Middleport, New York, until they came West in 
1844, settling thirty miles north of Detroit, in Oak- 
land Township, Oakland County, Michigan. From 
there they came to LaGrange County, Indiana, in 
1853, making the journey by wagon, and located on 
land in Milford Township which Israel L. had ac- 
quired previously. He made that his home for fif- 
teen years, and then sold his farm and again located 
on a fruit farm along the lake in Allegan County, 
Michigan, where he died. The widowed mother 
afterward came back to LaGrange County, and died 
at LaGrange in 1881. Israel L. Bullock ,\as an active 
whig in politics, and in 1856 became identified with 
the republican party. He was one of the early trus- 
tees of Milford Township. In his family were four 
children: Margaret, who died in infancy at Mid- 
dleport, Now York ; William M., Lewis O., and 
Myron O. William died in 191 5, and the only one 
living today is Lewis O. Bullock. 

He was ten years old when brought to Indiana, 
and has acquired the most of his education in the 
common schools of LaGrange County. On October 
6, 1865, he married Carrie M. Eastlick, who was 
born in Johnson Township, LaGrange County, In- 
diana, October 8. 1844, a daughter of William and 
Jane (McDonald) Eastlick, formerly of Mercer 
County. Pennsylvania. Their happy union was con- 
tinued for more than half a century. In 1915 they 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary and 
on February 24, 1917, the wife and mother passed 
away. Both were active members of the Church of 



God and Mr. Bullock is a charter member of the 
Knights of Pytliias and of the Pythian Sisters and 
has held offices in this fraternity. Through long 
years of industry he has accumulated an estate of 
133 acres of good farming land. In the family of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bullock were five children, of whom 
Warren Oscar died in 1869 ; John Ai died in 1877, 
aged eight years ; C. Dale died in 1902, aged twenty 
years ; and two are living, Lewis E., a farmer in 
Milford Township, and Ray E., who is unmarried 
and lives at home. 

Lewis E. Bullock, who lives on his farm two and 
a half miles north and a mile and three-quarters 
west of Milford, was born in Milford Township 
January 21, 1878. He attended the district schools, 
and after leaving school worked for a time in a 
sawmill in Northern Michigan. He came back to 
Indiana, worked out by the month, and then mar- 
ried Grace Latta, a native of LaGrange County and 
a daughter of William Latta. She is a graduate 
of high school, and before her marriage was a suc- 
cessful teacher. Since his marriage Mr. Bullock 
has farmed his father's place, and in 1918 he bought 
the eighty acres where he now lives and which 
joins his father's place. He is a breeder of good 
grades of live stock, is a republican in politics, and a 
member of the Ancient Order of Gleaners. He and 
his wife have one son. Dean O., born September 4, 
1911. 

JoHX B, P.^RSELL has a record as a farmer, public 
official and banker, and that record is in keeping 
with the hi.gh standing of the Parsell family, which 
became identified with Steuben County in pioneer 
times and has furnished many worthy citizens of the 
community. 

John B. Parsell was born in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County. October 2.=;, 1857. and is a son of 
Thomas B. and Caroline (Klink) Parsell. 

His grandfather was Moses S. Parsell, who was 
born February 12, 1797, near Newark, New Jersey. 
He was reared in that state, learned the trade of 
shoemaker, and in 1817 married Mary Campbell, who 
died in 1824. Moses Parsell was again married, 
March 17, 1825, to Hannah D. Crilley, and they be- 
came the parents of five children: Aaron G., Abijah 
D.. Thomas B., Sarah W. and Elizabeth S. 

In 1S3S Moses Parsell came West with his family 
and bought a tract of unimproved land in section 35 
of Jackson Townsliip, Steuben County, and went 
to work to improve it. After paying "for the land 
and building a small frame house, his plans were 
interrupted by his death in November, 1839. He left 
a widow and five children, the oldest less than fifteen 
years old. The mother played the good part of a 
pioneer, and kept the children together until she 



Vol. n- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



died in 1846. The old eighty-acre homestead of 
Moses Parsell is now owned by his grandsons, 
Austin and Ichabod Parsell, Austin still occupying 
the land. Of the children, Aaron G. was for many 
years a successful physician in Steuben County and 
died in 1904, aged seventy-eight. Abijah D. died 
in April, 1882, at the age of fifty-five. Thomas 
B. is mentioned below. Sarah W., after a life of 
service for others, died unmarried, April 19, 1905, 
aged seventy-five. The daughter Elizabeth became 
the wife of Avery Emerson and died April II, 1915, 
aged eighty-two. 

Thomas B. Parsell was born near Newark, New 
Jersey, January 12, 1829, and was nine years old 
when brought to Steuben County. He had limited 
advantages in the public schools, and early went to 
farming to assist his mother. Later he acquired a 
good farm of his own comprising 160 acres in sec- 
tion 35, Jackson Township, and that farm is now 
owned by his son, George T. Parsell. He died 
March 10, 1872. He was a republican in politics, 
and he and his wife were both active in the Presby- 
terian Church. 

February 6, 1853, Thomas B. Parsell married 
Caroline Klink, who was born near Tiffin, Ohio, 
December 5, 1830. Her parents were Christian and 
Mary (Failor) Klink. Christian Klink was born in 
Germany in 1794 and was a soldier in the famous 
army of Blucher and fought in the battle of Water- 
loo. He spent five years in the army, then came to 
America and married, and in 1846 brought his fam- 
ily to Steuben County, settling in Salem Township, 
where he acquired a farm of 200 acres in sections i 
and 2. He died there in 1872. The Klink children 
were : Louisa, the oldest, became the wife of Wil- 
liam Brugh, and died in Fulton County, Indiana, 
May 29, 1919, aged ninety-two ; John, who died in 
1870; Caroline, Mrs. Thomas B. Parsell, living on 
the farm, aged eighty-nine ; Catherine, wife of 
Morris Brown, of Steuben County, aged eighty-five ; 
Christina, who married E. H. Wilson and died in 
1907 ; Michael, who died in 1903 ; Mary, who became 
the wife of Newell Wilson and died in 1914; Eliza- 
beth, widow of W. W. Parsell and living at Ashley ; 
and Eli Klink, who died at Angola in 1909. 

Thomas B. Parsell and wife had three children: 
John B.; Mary Elizabeth, widow of Hiram 
M. Grain, and living in Angola, Mr. Grain having 
died at the farm home near Angola August 14, 1918; 
and George T., owner of the old homestead. 

John B. Parsell grew up on the old farm in Jack- 
son Township, attended the public schools and later 
Angola Academy, and for several years was em- 
ployed in teaching winter terms of school. In 1886 
he 'bought the Henry Butler farm of 200 acres in 
sections 5 and 8, Salem Township, and was busily 
engaged in improving and making a living from 
that property until 1895. In that year he moved to 
Angola to take up his duties as clerk of the Circuit 
Court, to which position he was elected in 1894. He 
was the incumbent of that office four years, retiring 
November i, 1899, after which he spent a summer 
on the farm and then returned to Angola and in 
February, 1901, entered the Angola Bank. In Oc- 
tober, 1903, he became one of the organizers of the 
First National Bank, the first bank of Steuben 
County to receive a national charter. He was as- 
sistant cashier for six years and since then has beer> 
cashier and director and has had much to do with 
the successful management of the institution. Mr. 
Parsell is a republican, is affiliated with the Masonic 
Lodge at Angola and with both branches of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

January i, 1887, he married Miss Carrie J. Abbey, 
a daughter of Giles T. and Martha A. Long Abbey. 



Her father was one of the early settlers of Steuben 
County and is now living with Mr. and Mrs. Parsell 
at the advanced age of ninety-two. Mrs. Parsell is 
a member of Pleasant Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah 
and of Angola Chapter of the Order of Eastern 
Star. Mrs. Parsell's mother died in 1864. Mr. and 
Mrs. Parsell have two children. Florence is a 
graduate of the Angola High School and from the 
musical department of Tri-State College, and re- 
ceived a diploma from the Chicago Art Institute in 
June, 1918. The son. Lewis, is a graduate of the 
Angola High School and of the electrical engineer- 
ing courses of Tri-State College and of Purdue 
University. 

Giles T. Abbey is one of the few surviving early 
citizens of Steuben County. He is now in his 
ninety-second year and his memory of events in this 
section of Northeast Indiana runs back fully eighty 
years. 

He was born in Sandusky County. Ohio. Novem- 
ber 24, 1827, son of Alanson and Lucy (Daggett) 
Abbey. Alanson Abbey was born in Ontario County, 
New York, January i'6. 1792, and was a Soldier in 
the War of 1812. His father, Joshua Abbey, fought 
in the Revolutionary war. Lucy Daggett, daughter 
of a Revolutionary soldier, was born in Ontario 
County, New York, in 1793. In 1819 they moved to 
Sandusky County. Ohio, and in the fall of 1838 came 
to Steuben County. Indiana. Two years before 
Alanson Abbey had entered land in section 22 of 
Steuben Township, and he improved it with a log 
house and set out an orchard. Later he sold this 
and lived on the shores of Pleasant Lake. He was 
a carpenter by trade and built many of the early 
barns in his neighborhood. Alanson Abbey was a 
whig and republican, and he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Free Will Baptist Church but later he 
joined the Christian Church. He died at Pleasant 
Lake in February. 1877, and his first wife died in 
1840. His children were: Henrietta, Lucy, Jacob 
D., Nancy, Giles T.. George J., and Minerva and 
Harvey, twins. The sons Jacob and George were 
both soldiers in the Civil war. Alanson Abbey was 
twice married. 

Giles T. Abbey was eleven years old when brought 
to Steuben County. He first attended school at 
Clyde, Ohio, and his teacher was Lydia Chase, 
grandmother of Gen. James McPherson, one of the 
most gallant Union leaders in the Civil war. It 
was three years after the family settled in Steuben 
County before a school was established convenient 
to the home. Giles T. Abbey then completed his 
education, and one of his teachers was George 
Emerson, an uncle of Fred Emerson, the present 
postmaster of Angola. He also attended a school 
kept by Dr. Aaron Parsell. an uncle of John B. 
Parsell. Mr. Abbey taught school for six terms 
when a young man. He first began farming by en- 
tering forty acres of Government land when nine- 
teen years old. Later he bought 102 acres in Steu- 
ben Township, selling this after two years and buy- 
ing 240 acres near Flint. There being no improve- 
ments, he rented the John Thompson farm and soon 
sold the land to Daniel Benninghoof. He left the 
farm and rented and operated for three years the 
L'nion Mills, and then bought eighty acres in Steu- 
ben Township adjoining forty acres he previously 
owned, and lived on it four years. 

While on that farm his first wife died. Her 
maiden name was Martha A. Long. They were 
married in 1850. She was the mother of two chil- 
dren : Ella J., wife of Wellington H. Hollister, of 
Waterloo; and Carrie J., wife of John B. Parsell, 
of Angola. In 1867 Mr. Abbey married Martha 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Davis. There were two children of that marriage, 
Edith L., wife of Albert F. Theiss. of Memphis, 
Tennessee, and Earl G., of Kansas City, Missouri. 

In 1864, the year his first wife died, Mr. Abbey 
moved to Waterloo, Indiana, and was employed in 
a grist mill there three years. He was also the first 
agent for the Fort Wayne, Jackson and Saginaw 
Railroad. For' twenty-seven years he served as 
cashier of the DeKalb Bank at Waterloo. He 
finally retired to a small farm adjoining that town 
and at present makes his home with his daughter, 
Mrs. John B. Parsell. Mr. Abbey has been a life- 
long republican and has been affiliated with the 
Masonic Order about fifty-four years. His second 
wife died in 1884, and he then married Sophia Mc- 
Entarffer, who died February 17, 1909. 

LroN RosK. While the City of LaGrange regarded 
the removal of Leon Rose to another and larger 
city in the summer of 1919 as a distinctive loss to its 
citizenship and prestige, there remained the satisfac- 
tion that the constructive work he had performed as 
a banker and business man is a permanent asset of 
the community, and also that Mr. Rose, though far 
removed from his birthplace, retains many inter- 
ests in his home city and county. 

Mr. Leon Rose was born at LaGrange March 17, 
l86g. His family have been prominent as merchants 
and bankers of LaGrange for over sixty j-ears. His 
father was the late Solomon Rose, who was born 
at Naumburg, Germany, November 2, 183.S. a son of 
Isaac and Eliza (Blum) Rose. Solomon Rose came 
to .\merica in i8.iO.' For three years he worked as a 
bookkeeper at Little Falls and Plattsburg, New 
York, and Worcester, Massachusetts. Coming to 
Indiana in 1853, he lived three years at LaPorte, 
then identified himself with the community of La- 
Grange, which he was proud to consider his home 
the rest of his life. When he came he had only a 
few hundred dollars, and with this opened a small 
stock of clothing in the north room of the old Betts 
Block. Later he moved to another frame building, 
occupying the site of the present Eisner store. In 
1865 his brother Silas Rose joined him as a partner 
at LaGrange, another brother. Elias, was a clerk in 
their store, and still another brother, Lazarus, was a 
grocery merchant in the town. Soon after the Grand 
Rapids and Indiana Railroad was built through the 
county in the earlv '70s Mr. Rose erected the first 
elevator on the right of way and for many years 
did an extensive grain and wool business. His mer- 
cantile interests rapidly increased, demanded larger 
quarters, and he built for their accommodation -the 
brick block now occupied by C. B. Hinkley. He and 
his brother Silas and later his son Isaac conducted 
a store, carr3'ing the largest stock of dry goods and 
clothing in LaGrange, until 1889, in which year Mr. 
Solomon Rose retired from merchandising and 
thereafter gave his entire time to banking. 

The First National Bank of LaGrange was or- 
ganized in September, 1874, with John S. Merritt, 
president, Solomon Rose, vice president, and R. S. 
Hibbard, cashier. Three years later Mr. Rose be- 
came president of the First National Bank. When 
it was reorganized as the National Bank of La- 
Grange he continued in the same office, and was the 
real as well as the titular head of this splendid finan- 
cial institution until the day of his death. 

On April 10, 1861, Solomon Rose married Caroline 
Myer, of New York City, but a native of Wuerz- 
burg, Bavaria. Most of their married life was spent 
in the pleasant old Rose home located in a grove 
on Hawpath Avenue. In this old homestead their 
eight children were born. Later Solomon Rose built 
and furnished a beautiful home on Michigan Street. 



In that environment he spent his last days, and death 
came to him November 10. 1906. He was a member 
of the Hebrew faith and was affiliated with the 
Masonic Order. 

Leon Rose as a boy in LaGrange attended the 
public schools, and also was a student in Notre Dame 
University at South Bend. For a few years he was 
in the mercantile business at New York City with 
his brother-in-law, Jacob David. On returning to 
LaGrange he became a merchant, his store occupying 
the site of the present building of the National Bank 
of LaGrange. After five years he sold out and en- 
tered the mercantile business with the Sol Mier 
Company of Ligonier. 

At his father's death he became manager of the 
National Bank of LaGrange, and was soon made its 
vice president and in January, 1919, he was elected 
president, and resigned this office six months later 
to accept an opportunity to associate himself with 
his brother Samuel Rose at Kansas City, Missouri. 
He is still one of the stockholders in the National 
Bank and one of the directors and owns four large 
farms in LaGrange County. When he succeeded his 
father as manager of the bank its resources were 
about $33,000, with capital, surplus and undivided 
profits of $80,000, In a dozen years the bank has 
grown to aggregate resources of $1,000,000, with 
its capital, surplus and undivided profit approximat- 
ing $125,000. Mr. Rose had three purposes in re- 
taining the management of the bank after his 
father's death. They were to make the National 
Bank of LaGrange one of the strongest institutions 
in Northern Indiana, also the largest financial insti- 
tution in LaGrange County, and to build for its 
accommodation one of the most beautiful banking 
homes in the Middle West. All these three purposes 
were accomplished before he resigned his major re- 
sponsibilities. 

Leon Rose was chairman of the four Liberty Loan 
organizations of LaGrange County and of the Vic- 
tory Loan Committee The response of the county 
to the Liberty Loan campaigns was the outstanding 
feature of the war activities in this section. Under 
the direction of Mr. Rose, with the assistance of 
local banks and loyal people generally, nearly 
$J,ooo,ooo were raised and turned over to the uses of 
the Government. Mr. Rose has for several years 
been vice president of the LaGrange Corn School 
Show. Each year he has given $150 for prizes on 
yellow corn and in 1919 he gave $175, the largest 
contribution for that specific purpose made to any 
institution in the State of Indiana. 

BuRDETTE B. GooDALE, assistant cashier of the 
First National Bank of Angola, is a son of the late 
Dr. Charles W. Goodale and member of one of the 
old and well known families of Steuben County. 

He was named for his grandfather, Burdette B. 
Goodale, who with his wife, Mary Ann Goodale, 
came from Cleveland, Ohio, and settled in Steuben 
County in 1842. They were among the pioneers of 
York Township, where the grandfather died June 15, 
1855, at the early age of thirty-eight. His widow 
survived him many years. There were four chil- 
dren : Albert N. was a soldier in the Forty-Second 
Illinois Infantry, and died of wounds received at 
Chickamauga in October, 1863. Orville F. Goodale 
served at one time as clerk of the County Court. 
The daughter, Amelia, married Abraham Stevens. 

Dr. Charles W. Goodale, who died January 5. 
190S, was born in York To.wnship of Steuben 
County May 11, 1844. He lived on the home farm, 
attended district schools, the Angola High School 
and Hillsdale College. While a student at Hillsdale 
he enlisted in the Thirtieth Michigan Infantry and 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



served about six months. He began the study of 
medicine under Dr. Hugh D. Wood at Metz, and 
finished his preparation in Rush Medical College of 
Chicago, where he was graduated in 1868. He re- 
turned to Metz and took up practice. From 1871 to 
1874 his home was in Reed City, Michigan, and the 
next four years he devoted to merchandising at 
Metz. In 1878 he located as a physician at St. Joe 
in DeKalb County, but returned to Steuben County 
in 1880, and for several years was again in business 
as a merchant. He resumed his practice in 1884 and 
continued in his profession the rest of his life. He 
was for many years a republican, a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and active in the Christian 
Church. September S, 1869, he married Miss Mar- 
garet A. Parrott, who was born January g, 1842, 
and is still living. Her parents were Sylvester and 
Henrietta (Ogden) Parrott, who were early set- 
tlers in Richland Township of Steuben County. 
Doctor and Mrs. Goodale had six children : Bur- 
dette B. ; Alice, wife of E. F. Rose, of York Town- 
ship ; Frank, who died at the age of twelve years ; 
Paul, of Huntington, Indiana; Mildred, wife of S. 
C. Huffman, superintendent of schools at Waseca, 
Minnesota ; and Ford, a resident of Indianapolis. 

Burdette B. Goodale grew up at Metz, attended 
public schools there, also the Tri-State College at 
Angola, and spent one year in Purdue University. 
For several years he taught school and then en- 
gaged in the drug business at Metz. 

In IQ04 he was elected county treasurer, and filled 
that office four years, two terms. He then pur- 
chased from his uncle, Francis Macartney, an in- 
terest in the Goodale Abstract Company, and in 
Au.gust, 1914, assumed his present duties with the 
First National Bank of Angola. Mr. Goodale is a 
republican and for many years has been a leader in 
his party in the county. Both he and his father 
were charter members in the Knights of Pythias 
Lodge at Metz. He and all his family are members 
of the Christian Church. 

January 6, 1897, Mr. Goodale married Miss Mar- 
garet AUman, daughter of Barnabas Allman, a well 
known farmer in Richland Township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodale have two children. Dorothy, born January 
21, 1898, is a graduate of the Angola High School, 
took further courses in the Tri-State College and 
is now a successful teacher. Charles D., born January 
18, 1900, is also a high school graduate and is now 
attending the Tri-State College. Mr. Goodale is 
interested in farming and owns a farm in Pleasant 
Township. 

U. C. Brouse, present mayor of Kendallville, has 
been a resident of Noble County all his life, was a 
practical and progressive farmer in Allen Township 
for a number of years, and has been identified with 
business affairs at Kendallville as a merchant and in 
other relations. 

His father, Curtis Brouse, who is now living re- 
tired at Kendallville, was born in Medina County, 
Ohio, October 20, 1840. He was fourteen years of 
age when he came to Noble County, and he lived in 
Allen Township until he retired from his farm. He 
was educated in the district schools, and in August, 
i86r, at the age of twenty-one, enlisted in Company 
F of the Thirtieth Indiana Infantry. He saw active 
service for twenty-one months. At the battle of 
Stone River he was shot through the left lung, and 
lay on the field of battle until the night of the 
second day before he was discovered and taken to a 
hospital. On account of this wound he received his 
honorable discharge May II, 1863, and then returned 
to Noble County. For practically a half century he 
was engaged in farming and stock raising, and has 



also been active in local affairs, serAfing as trustee 
of Allen Township and two terms as a county com- 
missioner. He is a republican and a member of 
Nelson Post No. 69, Grand Army of the Republic, 
July I, 1864, Curtis Brouse married Elvira E. Mat- 
thews. She was born in Grant County, Indiana, 
May 7, 1846. 

U. C. Brouse, only child of his parents, was born 
on the farm in Allen Township, June I, 1865. While 
a boy he attended the local schools and also the 
public schools at Kendallville. Being an only child 
he saw his duty on the home farm, and for many 
years conducted the place of 140 acres, doing a suc- 
cessful diversified farming business, raising regis- 
tered hogs of the Chester White strain, and some 
fine wool sheep. On retiring from the farm he was 
in the grocery business at Kendallville for five 
years. For the past ten years he has been secretary 
of the Fair Association at Kendallville, and has been 
one of the leaders in that organization from the 
first. In the fall of 1917 Mr. Brouse was elected 
mayor, and has given Kendallville a very progres- 
sive municipal administration. He is a republican 
and has served as a member of the Central Commit- 
tee of Noble County. He is also a member of the 
State Board of Agriculture. Fraternally his affil- 
iations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Knights of the Maccabees. 

Mr. Brouse married Miss Jennie Tyler, also a 
native of Allen Township, and they grew up in the 
same community. Mr. and Mrs. Brouse have one 
son, of whom they are justly proud. This son, Don 
Brouse, born August 19, 1895, is a graduate of the 
Kendallville High School and had two years in 
Purdue University. He is now with the American 
Army in France, as second lieutenant in Company 
H of the 335th Infantry, Eighty-Fourth Division. 

William F. Baughman has been an enterprising 
factor in the commercial life of Ashley for a number 
of years and is proprietor of a general store and of 
a large business with that community. 

He was born in Smithfield Township, DeKalb 
County, May 17, 1871, a son of B. R. and Margaret 
(DeVore) Baughman, both natives of Holmes 
County, 'Ohio. His father was born July 16, 1842, 
and is still living. As a youth he served in the 
Civil war, and has long been an active member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. He is a democrat. 
He and his wife were married in Ohio and came to 
Indiana in 1865, locating in DeKalb County. The 
mother died here April 6, 1880. She had four chil- 
dren, three of whom reached mature years, W. F., 
D. I., of Steuben County, and J. A., of Holmes 
County, Ohio. 

William F. Baughman grew up on a farm south of 
Ashley, and besides the advantages of the district 
schools attended the Tri-State College at Angola. 
He has followed several different occupations and 
for a time was an employe of the Wabash Railroad. 
Later he engaged in the hardware business, also was 
a druggist, and today has a stock of general mer- 
chandise. 

Mr. Baughman married Elba Lyle, formerly a 
resident of Iowa and a native of New York State. 
He is affiliated with Ashley Lodge No. 614, Free and 
Accepted Masons, with Ashley Chapter No. 152, 
Royal Arch Masons, and is a member of the Scot- 
tish Rite Consistory at Fort Wayne. He has served 
as worshipful master and high priest in the Masonic 
Order and is a past chancellor of Ashley Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias. Politically he is independent. 

John W. Priest. A business man of thirty years 
experience, John W. Priest has become the central 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



figure in several of the important businesses lo- 
cated at Topeka, where he is proprietor of the lum- 
ber yards and vice president of the Farmers State 
Bank. 

He was born in Williams County, Ohio, June 20, 
1868, a son of Joel and Catherine (Schwartz) 
Priest. His father, who was born in Holmes 
County, Ohio, in 1837, at the age of nineteen 
moved to Bryan, Ohio, where for several years he 
was active in the saw mill and lumber business. 
-About 1886 he bought a farm in Williams County, 
and later sold that and moved to Topeka, Indiana. 
He finally went to Michigan. He is a member of 
the Methodist Church and is a past grand of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a democrat 
in politics. His wife died in 1916. They were the 
parents of eleven children, three of whom are still 
living: John \\'. ; George, of Camden, Michigan; 
and James, of Reading, Michigan. 

John W. Priest grew up on his father's farm. He 
acquired a good education, the advantages of the 
district schools being supplemented by work in the 
Tri-State Normal College at Angola. For three 
years he taught school and since then has been en- 
gaged in the lumber business. 

He married Miss Gertrude Grose. Their son, 
Leroy, is a graduate of high school, spent some 
time in college, and is now associated with his 
father in business. John W. Priest is a thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason, also a member 
of the Chapter and Council in the York Rite. 

Major Guv J. Sfaughxiss, assistant postmaster 
at Angola, was one of the local citizens of Northeast 
Indiana whose qualifications and abilities as a soldier 
■were brought out and developed with the stress of 
the great war recently brought to a successful 
conclusion. 

Major Shaughniss was born in Otsego Township 
of Steuben County July 13, 1874, grew up on a 
farm, attended district schools, also the high school 
at Angola, and in igoo graduated from Hillsdale 
College in Michigan. He has since been a well 
known and prominent young citizen of Angola. 
He has filled the office of assistant postmaster since 
1909. 

Major Shaughniss became interested in military 
affairs in 1902 when he enlisted in the National 
Guard. He was promoted to second lieutenant in 
1905, to captain in 1907, and in 1915 to major. He 
saw six months of duty on the Mexican border and 
on August 5, 191 7, was mustered into the Federal 
service of the National army, becoming major of 
the First Battalion of the Third Indiana. On Octo- 
ber I, 1917, he was transferred to the One Hundred 
and Thirty-Seventh Field Artillery. 

Maior Shaughniss is a republican in politics, and 
is affiliated with the Masonic Order and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows lodges at Angola. He was 
united in marriage to Lvdia Jane Pence December 
18, 1918. 

He is a son of William and Eliza (Clark) 
Shaughniss, the former born near Ann .Arbor, 
Michigan, and the mother in Otsego. Steuben 
County, New York. Her father, James Clark, and 
his wife, Elizabeth Johnson, came to Steuben County, 
Indiana, in 1840, settling on a farm in Otsego 
Township. Later James Clark moved to Branch 
County, Michigan, and spent his last days there. 

William Shaughniss came to Steuben County, 
was married there, and spent his active life as a 
farmer. He was a democrat and a member of the 
Masonic Order. 

Besides Major Shaughniss, who was his youngest 



child, there were three other sons, Wilson J., James 
A. and John. John died in infancy. 

James A. Shaughniss, who was born August 5, 
1867, attended public schools, the high school at 
Quincy, Michigan, and Hillsdale College, and for 
twenty-two years has been engaged in the carriage 
business at Angola. A republican, he was elected 
county auditor in 1908 and gave a very successful 
administration of the office for four years. He has 
also been a member of the City Council, and is 
afliliated with the Masons and Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. December 24, 1018, he married 
Mrs. Laura (Deller) Deal, of Angola. 

Charles L. Smith has been a factor in business 
and local affairs at Albion for over forty years, 
and out of his work, good management and judg- 
ment acquired the competence which enables him 
to spend his declining years in comfort and peace. 

He was born at Tiffin, Ohio, April 30, 1847, and 
has now passed the age of three score and ten. 
His narents, Lewis C. A. and Anna M. (Reif) 
Smith, were both natives of Germany, his father 
born April 29, 1816, and his mother December n, 
1820. They grew up in their native country, but 
were married after they came to Tiffin, Ohio, July 
7, 1846. Lewis Smith was a gunsmith and locksmith 
and followed that occupation in Tiffin until 1859. 
He then located on a farm a mile and a half south 
of Tiffin, but about 1872 retired to the town and 
died at Tiffin in 1907. His wife passed away in the 
same city January 15, 1908. They were members 
of the German Lutheran Church, and the father was 
very active and liberal in its support. As an Amer- 
ican citizen he voted the republican ticket. There 
were seven children, and five are still living : Charles 
L. ; Mary, wife of Jacob Marquart; Amelia, wife of 
John Wisher; Emma, wife of Fred Bender; and 
Albert, who lives at Tiffin. 

Charles L. Smith grew up in Tiffin or on the 
farm nearby, and acquired his education in both 
the district and the city schools. He lived at home 
till the age of twenty-two. He was in the butcher 
business at Tiffin until 1876, when he removed to 
Albion and started his shop. Four year later, in 
1880, he bought out his partner, and continued active 
in that business, supplying many of the best people 
of the town and surrounding country with good 
meats until 1900. It was through steady application 
to this business that he made his competence. In 
1878 a fire destroyed his shop, but in a few years 
he had recovered all his lost ground. Mr. Smith 
has invested in real estate, and now owns two 
good farms, one of 230 acres and another of a 
113 acres. 

December 18, 1877, he married Miss Melissa 
Beck. She was born at Albion November 4, 1856, 
and her father, Michael Beck, a pioneer of Noble 
County, is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
three daughters. Leona, a graduate of high school, 
is the wife of Edwin Hicks, of Auburn, Indiana; 
Kate, also a high school graduate, married Ray C. 
Dilgard; May, a high school graduate, married 
Walter Bonham. Mrs. Smith is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he votes 
as a republican. He has never sought official honors 
and has been content to perform his comrnunity 
service as a business man. He is a director in the 
Farmers Bank at Albion. 

J. E. Jf.llison is the man chiefly responsible for 
giving Auburn one of its thriving industries, the 
Auburn Broom Company, of which he is one of the 
proprietors. Mr. Jellison is a broom maker of wide 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



experience, and is a man of affairs generally. He 
is well known as a public speaker, having gained 
his early reputation as a schoolboy orator, and is 
frequently heard in democratic party campaigns, his 
services in that line being much in demand. 

Mr. Jellison was born in Randolph County, Indi- 
ana, May 17, 1879, a son of Joseph and Mary 
(Cullen) Jellison. His father was also a native of 
Randolph County, and when eight years old ran 
away from home to join the army in the Civil war. 
While he was much too young for active service 
the company managed to keep him as a sort of 
mascot until the close of the war. His wife, Mary 
Cullen, was born on Kelly's Island near Sandusky, 
Ohio, and came to Indiana when nineteen years of 
age, her father being a man of wealth at Union City, 
Indiana. After the war Joseph Jellison entered 
the railroad service, helped grade the Panhandle 
Railroad, was a brakeman for some years and later 
a conductor of the Big Four. He was a Catholic 
and a democrat. There were five children in the 
family: Florence, deceased; J. E. ; Alice, wife of 
O. C. McLaughlin, of Dayton, Ohio ; Leo, who is 
married and lives at Dayton ; and Marie, unmarried 
and living at Portland, Indiana. The father of these 
children died March 7, 1907. 

J. E. Jellison spent three years of his early life at 
Indianapolis, but secured his education chiefly at 
Portland and Union City, graduating from the 
Portland High School in 1898. While in high school 
he represented the Town of Portland in an oratorical 
contest held at Richmond and was awarded third 
honors. For a time he was a drug clerk, was with 
the Adair Brothers in the drug business from 1899 
to 1901, and in the latter year became a broommaker 
at Ridgeville, Indiana. After three years he returned 
to Portland and bought a drug store, which he con- 
ducted for two years. He resumed the broom making 
business at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he re- 
mained three years, was similarly engaged at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, for two years, and then returned to 
Ridgeville and was secretary of a broom company 
there and later its sales manager. Mr. Jellison came 
to Auburn in 1916 and has built up the plant and 
industry of the Auburn Broom Company and made 
it one of the flourishing concerns of DeKalb County. 
In April, 1901, he married Miss Blanche Burke, of 
lay Countv. Indiana. She is also a graduate of the 
Portland High School. They have three children: 
Guinevere, born in November, 1903 ; Gareth, born 
in May, 190=;; and Francis, born in January, 1908. 
Mrs. Jellison is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, while he was reared a Catholic. 

Warren H. Throop. Through three generations 
and for over eighty years the Throop family have 
maintained a vigorous and influential position in 
Clear Lake Township of Steuben County. Several 
of the first settlers bore the name of Throop, and 
the confidence the family still enjoys in that com- 
munity is well testified to by the fact that the pres- 
ent township trustee is Warren H. Throop, a grand- 
son of one of the pioneers of the '30s. 

Warren H. Throop was born in the same town- 
ship September 3, 1864. His grandfather, Hiram 
Throop, was born in Canandaigua, New York, in 
1799. He married a Miss Sanford. The first re- 
corded settlers in Clear Lake Township entered land 
in 1836. Among them were Charles and Clark 
Throop, while in 1840 Hiram Throop came to the 
township. '1 he name frequently appears in the 
early as well as the later annals of the township. 
Hiram Throop's home was in section 28, and he 
lived in the township until his death in 1872. His 



children were Roxie, Mary, Estella, Samuel, Allen 
and Albert. 

Allen Throop was born June 14, 1832, and on 
April 12, 1857, married Cloa Dickinson. She was 
born in Chenango County, New York, in 1833, a 
daughter of James and Maria (Atwood) Dickinson. 
Allen Throop acquired his education largely in the 
district schools of Clear Lake Township, also at- 
tended school at Hillsdale, Michigan, and as a young 
man began farming in his home township and spent 
the rest of his life there. At the time of his death 
he owned 200 acres, all of it paid for. He died 
three weeks before his father, in 1872. His widow 
has survived him for over forty-five years, and has 
proved a capable business manager and has increased 
tlie homestead by the purchase of sixty acres. She 
was the mother of seven children : Frank ; Louisa, 
who became the wife of Frank Gowthrop; Elva, 
who married Fred Wigent; Clara, who died in child- 
hood ; Warren ; Nellie, who became the wife _ of 
George Gowthrop ; and Carrie, who died in child- 
hood. 

Warren H. Throop attended district school in 
Clear Lake Township and acquired his early knowl- 
edge and experience of farming on the homestead. 
For eight years he farmed in Scott^ Township, but 
with that exception has always live'd on the place 
where he was born. Today he owns 200 acres in 
section 28, known as Clear Lake Jersey Farm. He 
does general farming, but for several years has spe- 
cialized in the breeding of high grade Jersey cattle. 

Mr. Throop's public record includes ten years of 
service as township assessor. In January, 1919, he 
entered upon his duties as township trustee. 

He married Marilla Kellog, daughter of Josiah 
and Emelie (Swager) Kellog. To their marriage 
were born six children: Walter, who married Ida 
Chandler ; Ray, who married Clela Elgekrout ; 
Harry, whose wife was Lela Becker, by whom he 
has children, Robert and Victor ; Guy who married 
Mabel Brouse and has two children, Mildred and 
Cleon; Carl, who entered the National Army and 
died while in the Great Lakes Training Camp at 
Chicago ; and Lawrence. 

Herbert H. Wildman has spent all his life in 
the village of Wolcottville, began his career there 
as a merchant but for ever thirty-five years has 
been identified with banking, and is now president 
and principal owner of the Wildman State Bank. 

He was born at Wolcottville, April 5, i860, son 
of Levi L. and Louisa M. (Taylor) Wildman. His 
father was a native of Massachusetts. Herbert H. 
Wildman attended the common and high schools of 
Wolcottville, and his first business venture was as 
restaurant proprietor. Later he was in the general 
merchandise business at Wolcottville until he and 
his father started a private bank. In 1884 they re- 
organized, with his father as president and Herbert 
H. as cashier. Levi Wildman died in 1893, and was 
succeeded in the presidency of the bank by Herbert 
Wildman. In 1917 the bank was organized under 
a state charter as the Wildman State Bank, with 
Herbert H. Wildman, president, Lee S. Jennings, 
vice president, and G. H. Weaver, cashier. The only 
change in officers at the present time is that George 
C. Morgan is cashier. The other directors are 
Harry E. Roy, V. D. Weaver and Clyde A. ^Valb. 

Mr. Wildman married at the age of eighteen, 
Minnie C. Parks. They had four children: Viola 
W. is a high school graduate, finished her education 
in the Fort Wayne College, and is the widow of 
Charles S. Smith. Vida, a graduate of high school, 
is the wife of Clyde A. Walb of LaGrange. Leon 
L. after leaving high school took the full course at 




(J^cw^^t^/T^ 




A 




HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Wabash College and two years in Johns Hopkins 
University at Baltimore, and is now credit man 
for the Bowser Company at Toronto, Canada. The 
fourth child, Wilman, is deceased. 

Mr. Wildman is a mem1)er of the Baptist Church, 
served a number of years as its chorister, and all his 
children are musicians. He is aftiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the Lodge 
and Chapter of Masons at LaGrangc, and in politics 
is a republican, 

Oliver P. Buowx has been a fixture in the com- 
mercial life and service of the Village of Hamilton 
for thirty-six years. In fact he is regarded as the 
town's oldest resident, and the place is important 
to him also as his birthplace. 

He was born there August 17, 1857, a son of John 
and Susan (Mann) Brown. His father was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, in 1821, and his mother in the 
same state in 1834. John Brown came to Steuben 
County, Indiana, in the early '50s, and was a 
school teacher in DeKalb County, where lie mar- 
ried. After he settled at Hamilton he became a 
merchant and followed business there for many 
years, until his death in 1884. His widow survived 
him until igil. John Brown was a democrat and 
held the office of justice of the peace. He and 
his wife had the following children: Oliver P., Jane 
\V.. I.awson, Charles M., Eda, Mary E. and Kate. 

Oliver P. Brown grew up in his native village, 
attended the public schools there, and for over a 
tliird of a century has kept a confectionery store and 
barber shop. He owns the building in which he 
does business and has other property there. Mr. 
Brown is a stanch democrat, and is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Masons and attends 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 188.^ he married Miss Elva J. Fifer. She was 
born in Salem Township of Steuben County April 
2}. 1866, daughter of Lewis and Martha Fifer. Her 
father came to Steuben County in 1861, and was a 
farmer and a resident of the county for over forty- 
five years. He died July 2S. I9"6, and his wife 
passed away July 15, ton. In the Fifer family were 
the following children : Elva, Margaret Laura. John 
.•\dam, Orlando and Jessie Alvada. Mrs. Brown's 
mother had for her first husband Sylvanua George, 
and there is one child by that union, Edward Melvin 
George. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown have two sons. Grover 
Cleveland, the older, was born January 10, 1884, 
had a high school education, and is a barber by 
trade. He married Mary Crane, and their children 
are named Oliver Perry, Mildred Ann, Jessie Al- 
vada, Leander Timothy and James Kenneth. The 
second son, Cleland Kenneth, born July 15, 1880, 
was educated in the Hamilton grammar and high 
schools, and is now a successful young farmer in 
Franklin Township of DeKalb County. He mar- 
ried Audra Chilchote. 

Epward E. Pr.w. In LaGrange, Noble and Steu- 
ben counties the name Pray for at least half a 
century has been prominently identified with 
numerous business affairs. It is characteristic of 
the familv to promote new activities and keep busi- 
ness livelv wherever they are. Edward E. Pray 
represents the third generation of the family since 
they came to Northeast Indiana. He has figured 
conspicuously as a merchant, public official and 
farmer in the Helmer coir\munity of Steuben County, 
where he resides. 

He was born in Milford Township of LaGrange 
Countv November 10, 1868, son of Daniel and Sarah 
(Rhoads) Prav, his mother a native of Delaware 



County, Ohio, and a daughter of John Rhoads. His 
grandparents were John Williams and Charlotte 
Pray. John William Pray was born on the Susque- 
hanna River near Horseshoe Bend in Pennsylvania, 
moved from there to Sunbury, Ohio, later located 
near Kendallville in Noble County, Indiana, and 
spent the rest of his life on a farm. He and his 
wife had six children, named Daniel, Charles, David, 
Rhoda, Mary and Eunice. 

Daniel Pray, who was born at Sunbury, Ohio, in 
early youth, learned the trade of shoemaker. He 
was not satisfied with what he could turn out by 
his individual skill and established a business at 
Middletown, Ohio, and prospered until he had to 
meet the competition of machinery in making shoes. 
At one time he employed seven men in this shop. 
From Ohio he came to Milford Township of 
LaGrange County, Indiana, bought eighty-five acres 
of land, and after a few years established a brick 
yard near Kendallville, looking after the manage- 
ment of this business while his wife and family 
remained on the farm. After a few years he re- 
turned to the farm in Milford Township, and for 
several years his chief occupation was making brick 
there. He also made brick at Angola. In i8q8 he 
moved to Helmer. taking charge of the grain ele- 
vator, which he operated for eight years. At the 
same time he was in partnership with his son in a 
general store at Helmer under the firm name of 
D. Pray & Son. Before moving to Helmer he con- 
ducted a general store at Turkey Creek. He has 
been retired from business affairs since 1903, and 
is now living in Milford Township of LaGrange 
County. He and his wife had a family of six 
children : Carrie B., Emma A., William, Edward 
E., Alice F (who died young), and Grace V. 

Edward E. Pray has spent almost as busy a life 
as his father. He acquired his early education in 
the district schools of Milford Township, finished 
the eighth grade at Kendallville and for two years 
was a student in Angola. He helped work the home 
farm, also assisted in running the store on the 
farm, and in the fall of 1889 became a partner with 
his father in a general store at Turkev Creek. This 
business was moved to Helmer in 1897, and the 
partnership between father and son was continued . 
until 1905, after which Mr. Pray operated the store 
alone until September, 1915. He then sold his busi- 
ness. For twelve years he was postmaster of 
Helmer, keeping the office in his store. Mr. Pray 
owns a good farm of 107 acres in section 34 of 
Salem Township, and since selling his store has 
continued to make his home in Helmer and from 
that point supervises his farm. He has held a com- 
mission as notary public for fifteen years. He was 
for many years affiliated with Helmer Lodge No. 
424 of the Knights of Pythias, until the lodge lost 
its charter. Mr. Pray in 1909 married Clara Metz, 
a daughter of Emanuel Metz. 

Irven O. Buchtel. M. D. A physician and sur- 
geon of the homeopathic school whose skill and abili- 
ties are widely appreciated over DeKalb County, 
Doctor Buchtel has practiced at Auburn many years 
and is a native of Northeast Indiana. 

He was born at Ligonier August 6. 186-'. a son of 
Charles C. and Sarah E. (Simmons) Buchtel. His 
parents were both natives of Stark County, Ohio, 
were married in that state, and coming to Indiana 
located in Ligonier, where they spent the rest of 
their lives. The father was a carpenter and con- 
tractor, was active in local affairs, serving as con- 
stable and member of the regulators, and was a 
democrat in politics, while his wife was a member 
of the Christian Church. Doctor Buchtel is one of 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



six children and he has two brothers still living: S. 
E., a merchant at Knightstown, Indiana, and C. W., 
in business at Cleveland, Ohio. 

Doctor Buchtel grew up at Ligonier, graduated 
from the high school there, and attended Buchtel 
College, now Akron University, in Ohio, where he 
received his Bachelor of Science degree and took his 
medical work in the Hahnemann Medical College in 
Chicago. He also had three years experience and 
training in New York City and one year in Chicago. 
Doctor Buchtel is a member of the State Institute of 
Homeopathy and the American Association of Orifi- 
cial Surgeons. He is treasurer of the Auburn School 
Board, a democrat in politics, is a member of the 
Masonic lodge, the Commercial Club and a stock- 
holder in the City National Bank of Auburn. April 
28, 1889, Doctor Buchtel married Nettie E. Dowell. 
They have a daughter, Lucile, who has graduated 
from the Auburn High School and is at home. 

John Gasser. The Gasser family has been 
identified with Steuben County for over three quar- 
ters of a century. As good substantial farmers and 
equally substantial citizens they have contributed 
their share to the development and progress of this 
locality, and their name is one justly respected and 
esteemed. 

The father of Mr. John Gasser, now a retired 
resident of Angola, was the late Benedict Gasser, 
who lived in Steuben County over sixty years. He 
was born in Berne, Switzerland, August 9, 1817, son 
of John and Anna Gasser, who in 1833 brought 
their family of nine children to the United States 
and settled in Sandusky County, Ohio, where the 
mother died the same year and the father the next 
year. This left the children unprovided for, and 
they were cared for by different parties. Benedict 
was a young man when his parents came to this 
country, and he did his part in providing for his 
own living and helping his brothers and sisters. 
In Sandusky County, Ohio, in 1840 he married 
Caroline Albert. She was born in Hesse Germany, 
November 18, 1819. It was two years * Iter their 
marriage that Benedict Gasser and wife came to 
Steuben County and located in section 20 of 
Scott Township. He bought forty acres of wild 
land, built his log cabin in the woods, and worked 
steadily until he had most of it under cultivation. 
Later he increased his farm to 120 acres, and two 
years before his death moved to Angola, where he 
died in 1905, at the age of eighty-seven. His good 
wife passed away in 1893, aged seventy-five. Bene- 
dict Gasser was a democrat and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He and his wife had 
nine children : Sanford and Margaret, deceased ; 
John ; Josephine ; Mary, deceased ; Frederick, Addie, 
Eva and Ida. 

John Gasser was born in Steuben County Febru- 
ary 8, 1848, and spent his early life on the old 
home place, acquiring his education in the public 
schools. After reaching manhood he acquired the 
other interests in the old farm, and not only 
handled it successfully but added to its area by fifty 
acres, giving him a fine place of 170 acres in Scott 
Township. Not long ago he sold this farm for 
$137.50 an acre, and the sale set a record for high 
prices paid for land in large farms in Steuben 
County. On February 21, 1918, Mr. Gasser moved 
to Angola, and has one of the good homes in the 
town, with a large lot running from one street to 
another and a vacant lot, where he keeps himself 
busy in the summer time gardening. He also em- 
ploys his spare time as a fur buyer, and has been 



buying furs for about thirty years and is an author- 
ity on that branch of commerce. 

In politics Mr. Gasser is independent and strongly 
favors prohibition. He has never aspired to 
political office and he and his wife are members of 
the Christian Church. In 1893 he married Miss 
Ella Moss, of Steuben County. She died in 1906. 
In October, 1909, Miss Sarah L. Crawford, of 
Williams County, Ohio, a cousin of his first wife, 
became his bride. 

Samuel H. Galloway has long been a citizen of 
prominence and usefulness in Sparta Township, 
where he is the present trustee and also a success- 
ful farmer, has been identified with school work as 
a practical school man and teacher, and altogether 
has filled his rather brief life with intense activities. 

Mr. Galloway, whose home is on his farm in sec- 
tion 33 of Sparta Township, was born in the same 
locality September 20, 1886, a son of John F. and 
Eliza (Brown) Galloway, the former a native of 
Sparta Township and the latter of Kosciusko Coun- 
ty, Indiana. His father was a farmer in Noble County 
for many years. He was twice married, his second 
wife being Ellen Burns. By the first marriage there 
were four children : Samuel H. ; Rosa A., a gradu- 
ate of the common schools and wife of Ernest Wilk- 
inson ; Sarah E., wife of Ray Prentiss ; and Mary 
E., who is unmarried and lives at home. 

Samuel H. Galloway grew up on his father's farm, 
and was liberally educated. He is a graduate of the 
Cromwell High School, attended the Tri-State Nor- 
mal School at Angola, and also was a student in 
Valparaiso University. His work as a school man 
has covered a period of about thirteen years. He 
owns a well kept and well managed farm of forty- 
three acres, and has about seventy acres in farming 
use. He is also a stockholder in the Sparta State 
Bank at Cromwell. 

October 12, IQ12, Mr. Galloway married Jennie 
Piper, daughter of Charles and Viola Piper. They 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Cromwell and Mr. Galloway is also superintendent 
of the Sunday School of the Broadway Christian 
Church. He is affiliated with the Masonic and 
Knights of Pythias lodges at Cromwell and in 
politics is a republican. 

Charles O. Jones has been a member of the 
farming community of Millgrove Township for over 
thirty years, and his own work and interests have 
supplemented the record of a family that through its 
different branches have been a part of Steuben 
County history since earliest times. 

Mr. Jones was born in Franklin Township of 
DeKalb County, Indiana, September 21, 1861, and 
has lived in Steuben County since early childhood. 
His father, Hiram S. Jones, was born in Vermont 
in January, 1834, a son of Samuel and Jerusha Jones. 
In 1843 the Jones family came to DeKalb County, 
Indiana. Samuel Jones spent the rest of his life 
there as a farmer. His children, included Julius, 
Sidney. Henry, Miller, William, Sarah, Hattie and 
two that died in infancy. 

Hiram S. Jones had an eventful experience in 
California during six years of his early manhood. 
October 21, i860, he married Nancy J. Clark, who 
was born at Lockport, New York, in 1836, a daugh- 
ter of Isaac and Jane M. Clark, natives of New 
York, who moved to Fulton County, Ohio, in 1857, 
in i860 to DeKalb County, Indiana, and two years 
later to Kalamazoo, Michigan. Isaac Clark also 
spent some time in Steuben County. His children 
were named Nancy, William, Alice, Mary and James. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Hiram S. Jones farmed for a number of years 
in UeKalb Comity, also lived on the Clark farm 
in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, and in 1872 bought 
back his old homestead in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County. He died while attending the 
County Fair on October 18, 1877. He and his wife 
had five children: Charles O., Frank B., Fred A., 
and Lillie and Leila, twins. The mother of these 
children was married in 1884 to Almon \V. Thorpe. 

Charles O. Jones acquired most of his education 
at Orland, also attended school at Flint, and in 1889 
began farming his present place in Millgrove Town- 
ship. He has specialized in thoroughbred stock, 
breeding Poland China hogs of the big type and 
also Shropshire sheep. His farm coiriprises seventy 
acres situated in sections 33 and 28. Mr. Jones is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge at Orland. 

November 27, 1883, he married Myrtia Turner, a 
daughter of William and Susan Turner. Her 
father was born in Connecticut in 1831 and her 
mother in Steuben County in 1839. Her mother was 
a Salisbury. Both the Turner and Salisbury fami- 
lies figure prominently in the history of Steuben 
County, as noted on other pages. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jones had four children: Murl, wife of Joseph 
Moffett and the mother of Helen and Florence; 
Urban, who married Vera Waters and has a daugh- 
ter, Martha; Bruce, who married May Nash; and 
Beulah, who was a trained nurse and died in a 
Chicago hospital. 

Charles Carter. The coming years loom large 
with economic problems, but of them all, none are as 
important as the production of foodstuffs in sufficient 
quantities to supply not only the constantly increas- 
ing domestic demand, but that of European nations 
now partially dependent upon American farmers for 
the necessities of ordinary existence. Because of 
these conditions the status of the farmer has very 
materially improved and his calling is recognized as 
one of the most important, and those men of ex- 
perience in agricultural activities are urged to remain 
in harness during the next few years, which are to 
prove so potent in the world's history. One of 
the rnen of Steuben County, Indiana, who has spent 
his life in cultivation of the soil is Charles Carter, 
who owns a valuable farm in Steuben Township. 

Charles Carter was born on his present farm 
March 18, 1854, son of Samuel and Sarah Ann 
(Frink) Carter, and grandson of Jonas Carter, the 
founder of the family in Steuben County, Indiana, 
and also a grandson of Selah Frink. The birth 
of Jonas Carter took place in Worcester County, 
Massachusetts, in June, 1767, but he left his native 
county in young manhood, going to Luzerne County, 
Pennsylvania, and investing quite heavily in farm 
land there, upon which he lived for many years. 
After locating in that county he was married to 
Catherine Wheeler, born in New Jersey in 1774, 
who was taken to Pennsylvania by her parents after 
the frightful massacre of Wyoming, from which 
they fortunately escaped. After the birth of eight 
of their nine children Jonas Carter and his wife 
moved to Delaware County, Ohio, making the trip 
in November, 1815. once more entering upon the 
privations and hardships of pioneer life. They were 
among the very earliest settlers of that county, and 
here they improved a farm and reared their chil- 
dren. Animated by the same spirit which prompted 
Jonas Carter to migrate, his sons struck out for 
themselves, pushing a little farther westward, into 
northeastern Indiana. In October Lewis and John 
Carter sons of Jonas Carter, entered several hun- 
dreds of acres comprising portions of sections 13, 
24 and 25, Steuben Township, Steuben Countv. They 
returned to Ohio in the fall, but John came back 



to their claim the next year, bringing his family 
with him, and he erected a log cabm m July, 183O, 
in section 24. In July, 1837, Lewis Carter returned 
to Steuben County, bringing with him not only 
his own family but his father and his family. Jonas 
Carter located on a farm later owned by his son 
Samuel, and lived in a log cabin Samuel had erected 
for him, and this continued his home until his death 
in November, 1842. His wife died from the effects 
of a fall into the cellar while on a visit to her 
son-in-law, Mr. Jackson, in 1853. The children 
of Jonas Carter and his wife were as follows : Sarah, 
Rufus, Lewis, Abigail, John N., Jonas, James, Sam- 
uel and Mary Ann. 

Samuel Carter was born in Luzerne County, 
Pennsylvania, June 27, 1814. His first trip to Steuben 
County, Indiana was made in June, 1835, and he 
located here permanently in 1836, in the latter year 
entering about 620 acres of land in Steuben Town- 
ship. He worked his father's farm until the demise 
of the latter, when he acquired it, and moved upon 
a portion of the land he had entered, but within 
four years moved to the homestead, where he died 
in August, 1873. His wife also came of a pioneer 
family, and was born in Madison County, New York, 
a daughter of Selah Frink, a soldier of the War 
of 1812. She died in April, 1873, having borne her 
husband six children, namely : Mary L.. Sarah H., 
Charles, Lucy J., Ellen and Celestia. 

Charles Carter attended the public schools of Steu- 
ben Township, and was brought up on his father's 
homestead. After attaining his majority he began 
operating his father's farm, but after his marriage 
he went to Virginia and lived on a peanut farm for 
a year, returning in 1900 to the homestead and con- 
ducting it for two 3'ears. For the subsequent si.x 
years he was engaged in farming west of Angola 
in Pleasant Township, and then once more came 
back to his birthplace. In 1909, Mr. Carter went 
to DeKalb County, Indiana, and spent a year, and 
the next year he was in Steuben County. Going 
Isack to DeKalb County, he resumed his farming 
in that locality, and remained for four years, and 
in 1917 returned to the Carter homestead, where 
he has since resided. His property is one of the 
best farms in the township and his buildings, fences 
and machinery show that he understands his busi- 
ness and takes a pride in his premises. He belongs 
to the Masonic fraternity and the Grange, and Mrs. 
Carter is a Gleaner. 

In 1890 Charles Carter was united in marriage 
with Mrs. Mary Hanselman, widow of Charles 
Hanselman, and a daughter of John and Mary 
(Crum) Willemar. By her first marriage Mrs. Carter 
had three children, namely: Jennie, who married 
Fred Frisbie ; Earl, who was the second in order of 
birth; and Mabel, who married Frank Dirrim. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carter are numbered among the very best 
people of this section of the county, and their 
pleasant home is the gathering place for' their friends 
upon numerous occasions, for they enjoy dispensing 
a generous hospitality to those to who"m they are 
bound by ties of affection. 

Emf.ry White. The name of Emery White has 
been associated for a long period of years with the 
ownership of a good farm in Salem 'Township, and 
with the substantial financial interests of that 
locality. 

Mr. White, who came to Steuben County forty- 
five years ago, was born in Richland County, Ohio, 
in Maj', t8,2, a son of Henry and Susan (Breise) 
White. His parents were both natives of Columbia 
County, Pennsylvania, lived in Richland County, 
Ohio, for a number of years and in 1873 came to 
Steuben County and located in Jackson "Township. 



10 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



In 1875 they moved to Salem Township and had 
twenty acres at Flint and later lived on the farm 
now owned by their son Emery. The father died 
in igo7, at the age of eighty-six. There were seven 
children : Amanda, deceased, Emery, Mary and 
Matilda deceased, Francis and Nettie, twins, the 
former deceased, and Minta. The father was inde- 
pendent in politics and attended the Methodist 
Church and later the Church of God. 

Emery White received his education in Richland 
County, Ohio. As a youth he learned the trade of 
tanner and worked in a leather store at Mansfield 
and Plymouth, Ohio. He came with his parents 
to Steuben County in 1873 and in 1875 bought a 
farm of eighty acres. At present he has 240 acres 
in his home place and thirty acres near Hudson. 
He still does some farming, though most of his 
land is rented. Several years ago a fine barn was 
struck by lightning, entailing a loss of $2,000, but 
was rebuilt with an equally good structure the same 
year. Mr. White for a number of years has been 
in business as a money lender. He has been very 
successful in financial matters. Mr. White is un- 
married and is a republican voter. 

Christian E. Slab.a.ugh. Many long years of 
hard and earnest labor have given Christian E. Sla- 
baugh their proper reward in a prosperity measured 
by large land holdings and a wealth of community 
esteem. Mr. Slabaugh is no longer actively identi- 
fied with farming pursuits, but is still living in his 
country home in section 10 of Perry Township, 
syi miles northwest of Ligonier. 

A native of Indiana, he was born in Clay County, 
September 2g, 1846, son of Elias and Mary Sla- 
baugh, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter of Germany. His parents were married in 
Pennsylvania, and coming to Indiana settled in the 
western part of the state, in Clay County. That 
was their home for about ten years, but in 1852 
they moved to Elkhart County and bought another 
farm. Several years later they traded for land in 
Perry Township of Noble County, and on that place 
spent the rest of their days. Elias Slabaugh was a 
well to do farmer and had made all his wealth 
through his own efforts. He was a member of the 
Dunkard Church and a democrat in politics. Of 
five children, three are still living: Nancy, wife of 
John Emmett, of LaGrange County; William, who 
lives in the State of Washington; and Christian E. 
Christian E. Slabaugh was six years old when his 
parents moved to Elkhart County, and he has spent 
nearly all his life in that and in Noble counties. He 
had a common school education, and lived at home 
until the age of twenty-one. In 1870 he married 
Catherine Bowsher, who was born in Perry Town- 
ship, Noble Countv. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Slabaugh rented land for one year, and he 
then bought sixty acres, the nucleus of his steaddy 
increasing estate, which is represented now by the 
ownership of nearly QOO acres here and elsewhere, 
including 400 acres of land in New Mexico. He 
also owns some real estate in Central Colorado. 
Mr. Slabaugh is a stockholder in the Citizens Bank 
at Ligonier and in the Farmers Co-operative Ele- 
vator'of the same city. He is a democrat and has 
served as township supervisor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Slabaugh have four children: Sid- 
ney, of Perry Township; Willard, of Perry Town- 
ship; Ollie, wife of John Larimer, of the State of 
Montana ; and Ray, of Perry Township. 

Harley H. Webb is cultivating acres that were 
once cultivated by his father, and is living on the 
same farm where he was born in Millgrove Town- 



ship, in section 26. Mr. Webb is one of the highly 
thought of citizens of that community, and his 
family is one of the best in Steuben County. 

Mr. Webb was born April 3, 1876, a son of Arthur 
and Permilla (Case) Webb. His mother was born 
in Pleasant Township of Steuben County. Arthur 
Webb was born in England in 1828, son of John 
and Grace (Harrison) Webb, both natives of Eng- 
land who came with their family to America in 1830. 
The Webbs settled in Steuben County as pioneers 
in 1845, coming here from Michigan. 

Arthur Webb in 1850, when a young man of 
twenty-two, left Steuben County and went overland 
by mule team to California. He lived in the gold 
districts of the Pacific Coast for about five years, 
and on returning to the States came by boat and 
around Cape Horn. From New York City he re- 
turned to Millgrove Township and spent the rest 
of his life in that locality, where he died in igi2. 
He was four times married. His first wife was a 
Miss Heath, and she was the mother of two daugh- 
ters, Eva and Amy. For his second wife Arthur 
Webb married Rose Case, and her children were 
Delmer, Jessie, Zella and Rosa. For his third wife 
Arthur Webb married Permilla Case, a sister of his 
second wife. His fourth wife was Martha Hallet, 
and she is still living. 

Harley H. Webb, only child of his father's third 
marriage, acquired his education in the district 
schools of Millgrove Township and has been farm- 
in,g since early youth on the place where he now 
lives. He owns no acres in section 26, and besides 
farming and stock raising keeps bees as a source 
of pleasure as well as profit. He is one of the 
skilled bee keepers in the county. 

In 1897 Mr. Webb married Miss Alida McGrew, 
a daughter of Melvin McGrew. Her family, and its 
various connections and interests in Steuben County, 
is described on other pages of this publication. Mr. 
and Mrs. Webb have two children, Hilda and Joyce. 

Charles Libey. While Mr. Libey's work and 
interests for many years have been identified with 
one farm in Salem Township of Steuben County, 
the record of his family in its different connections 
runs through two counties of Northeast Indiana, 
Steuben and DeKalb. 

Mr. Charles Libey was born in Steuben Township 
of Steuben County, July 31, 1870, son of George E. 
and Matilda E. (Houser) Libey. The parents were 
both natives of Coshocton County, Ohio, his mother 
being a daughter of John and Mary (Gonser) 
Houser. John Houser was one of the early pioneers 
of DeKalb County, Indiana, locating in Fairfield 
Township in 1847 and living there until after the 
death of his wife in 1894, when he moved to Salem 
Township of Steuben County and lived at the home 
of his daughter Mrs. George Libey until his death 
also in 1894. He had the following children : Matilda, 
Sarah, Ella, Katie and Louisa. 

William Libey grandfather of Charles Libey, came 
from Pennsylvania to Ohio and from the latter 
state to Fairfield Township in DeKalb County, 
Indiana, in 1847. His farm cornered on that of 
John Houser. He and his wife died there, leaving 
a family of small children, George E., the oldest, 
David, Mary, Jacob, Elizabeth and Margaret. 

George E. Libey left DeKalb County in 1869 and 
located on a farm now within the corporation limits 
of Ashley in Steuben Township. He remained there 
about four years and then established his home on 
the farm in section 25, Salem Township, now oc- 
cupied by his son Charles. In 1901 he and his wife 
moved to Hudson, where he died in April. 1902, and 
his Avife in the following December. Both were 
active members of the United Brethren Church at 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Hudson. They had eight children : Frank, who 
died in 1900; Ulysses G. ; Sarah E., wife of William 
Fink; Alnion G.; Charles; John E, ; Bert W., and 
Ora W. 

Charles Libey grew up in Salem Township, at- 
tended the Osborne school there, and about the time 
lie turned his majority he began farming the home 
place and also rented other fields near by. He bought 
forty acres of the old farm in 1903, and gradually 
has expanded his property with the increase of his 
means until he now owns 100 acres. He has re- 
modeled and added to all the buildings, and has 
one of the best sets of farm buildings in the town- 
ship, including a house of modern equipment and 
comfort. 

Most of his time is now taken up with the busi- 
ness of his home place. For six years he was 
honored with and gave a most efficient administra- 
tion of the office of trustee of Salem Township. 

July 8, 1897. Mr. Libey married Mis Carrie Clink, 
daughter of Charles and Catherine (Ritter) Clink. 
Her father was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, in 
1838, a son of George and Catherine Clink, and at 
the age of twenty years he came to Steuben County, 
later going back to Ohio, and in the spring of 1861 
returned to Steuben County and in August of the 
same year enlisted in Company A, of the Forty- 
fourth Indiana Infantry. He was with his regiment 
two years, then reenlisted. and served until honor- 
ably discharged in September, 1865, holding the 
rank of sergeant. He was in many of the great 
battles of the war, including Fort Donelson, Stone 
River and Chickamanga. Charles Clink in 1869 
bought a farm of 120 acres in Salem Township, 
and besides working the farm he also followed more 
or less the carpenter's trade. 

Mr. and Mrs. Libey have two children, Lucille 
is a graduate of the Hudson High School, has 
taken three terms in the Tri-State College at Angola, 
and is now a teacher in the schools of Metz. North 
C. is also a graduate of the high school at Hudson. 

Chari.fs E. Wells is one of the older merchants 
of .Angola, and for many years has served some of 
the best town and country trade as a grocer. 

His people were identified with the early settle- 
ment of this county, and he was born here Feb-uary 
8. _ 1864, son of Friend S. and Adaline (Howard) 
Wells. Both parents were also natives of Steuben 
County. The grandfather, L. Wells, came to Steu- 
ben County when it was practically a wilderness. 
He married .Ann Soule. The father of Adaline 
Howard was Morris Howard. Friend S. Wells was 
reared and educated in Steuben County and followed 
the trade of carpenter until his death. He was a 
democrat and at one time served as trustee of 
Pleasant Township. He was also active in the 
Christian Clnirch. His widow is still living. They 
were the parents of two sons, Charles E. and 
Archie, both of Angola. 

Charles E. Wells attended the public schools of 
Angola, and after leaving high school took a busi- 
ness course in Valparaiso College. He learned 
merchandising by practical experience as a clerk in 
some of the Angola stores, and then entered busi- 
ness for himself. He has been a merchant for 
twenty-two years and now owns a well-stocked 
establishment at the corner of Elizabeth and Maumee 
streets, where he has been in business for twelve 
years. Mr. Wells also owns a farm in Pleasant 
Township. He has never cared for the honors and 
responsibilities of public office, is a democratic 
voter and is affiliated with the Knights of the 
Maccabees. 

In December, 1886, he married Miss Hattie Mor- 



row. She was born in Pleasant Township of 
Steuben County in 11^65, daughter of Henry and 
Era (ToUe-s) Morrow. Her parents came from 
Hammondsport, Steuben County, New York, first 
settling in LaGrange County, Indiana, where they 
lived sixteen years and then removed to .Angola, 
where both of them died. Mrs. Wells' mother died 
in 1918, at the age of ninety-one. Mrs. Wells is 
one of three daughters, Elizabeth, Lucy and Hattie, 
all of whom live at Angola. Elizabeth is the widow 
of John Richardson and Lucy is the widow of Joseph 
Peil. Mr. and Mrs. Wells have two sons. Cleon 
M., born in 1887, was well educated in the high 
school and the Tri-State College and is now with 
his father in business. He married Lila Brown. 
The second son, Leighton B., born in 1893, has 
earned distinction as a professional musician. He 
graduated from the Angola High School and 
studied music in the Bush Conservatory of Music 
at Chicago. He is now following his profession at 
Chicago, and married Miss Ina Brant, who came 
from the vicinity of Kansas City. 

John R. Reese has been identified with the farm- 
ing community of Perry Township in Noble County 
practically all his life, and has been an active factor 
therein for over a quarter of a century. He is a 
veteran of the threshing business, and owns a large 
acreage and a valuable farm which represents to a 
large extent his varied industry and capabilities. 
His home is. two miles east of Ligonier. 

He was born in Perry Township, June 30, 1871, 
son of John and Elizabeth (Peters) Reese. His 
parents were born in Germany, came to the United 
States when young, and two years later were mar- 
ried at Buffalo, New York. They subsequently re- 
moved to Noble County. Indiana, and settled in 
Ffkhart Township. They were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. John Reese after ac- 
quiring American citizenship voted as a democrat. 
They had eight children, but only two are now living, 
Elizabeth and John R. Elizabeth is the wife of 
Ernest Sorgenfrei and lives with her brother. 

John R. Reese has spent his entire life in the 
vicinity of his present home. He acquired a com- 
mon school education and after reaching manhood 
he bon.ght out the interests of the other heirs in the 
old homestead of 113 acres and has since made 
steady progress toward the acquisition of a large 
landed estate, and now has +22 acres all in Perry 
Township and most of it adjoining. He uses this 
land for the raising of general crops and livestock. 
As a thresherman he ran an outfit for twenty years, 
and became known to all the farmers in his and a 
number of adjoining townships. Mr. Reese is a 
democrat in politics, is affiliated with the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and with Ligonier Lodge No. 123. 
Knights of Pythias. 

Orl.^ndo Kimmell. Of the older residents of 
Noble County few have, made themselves more 
prominently a part of the community aii'l have en- 
joyed more of the well ordered prosperity that 
comes with long years and hard work than Orlando 
Kimmell, whose name is perpetuated in the Village 
of Kimmell, and whose home is in York Township 
on the Lincoln Highway, two miles southeast of the 
village of that name. 

Mr. Kimmell was born at Canton in Stark County, 
Ohio, March 25, 1830, and has now attained that 
venerable age where he can survey in retrospect 
more than fourscore years. His father, Joseph Kim- 
mell, was a native of Pennsylvania, son of Joseph 
Kimmell, Sr., a native of the same state, who became 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



an early settler in Stark County, Ohio, and lived and 
died there. Joseph Kimmell, Jr., married in Stark 
County Catherine Amich, a native of that county. 
They lived there until 1851, when they removed to 
Noble County, Indiana, and in this county Joseph 
Kimmell acquired a farm of 195 acres and was one 
of the well known and substantial residents the rest 
of his days. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and was quite active in republican politics, 
serving as trustee and as a justice of the peace in 
Ohio. He was the father of five children : Cyrus, 
who spent his life in York and Sparta townships in 
Noble County; Harriet, who married John Arnold; 
Orlando, the only living member of his father's fam- 
ily ; Maria, who married Nathan White ; and 
Emeline, who became the wife of George Casper. 

Orlando Kimmell was twenty-one years of age 
when he came to Noble County. He had attended 
the log school houses of Ohio, and in that way 
acquired a practical education. On January 24, 1856, 
Mr. Kimmell married Jane White. She was born in 
Marion County, Ohio, and was brought to Noble 
County, Indiana, when a girl. She attended some of 
the old log school houses of this county. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Kimmell settled on his 
father's farm, and rented for thirteen years. His 
energy as a farmer and as a general business man 
enabled him to accumulate at one time 1,200 acres 
of land, and he still owns 1,120 acres. The town of 
Kimmell was built on land which he owned, and it 
was through his instrumentality that the railroad 
right of way was located as it was and the station 
established bearing his name. Mr. Kimmell made 
most of his money raising livestock, and has been 
a buyer and seller of livestock for many years. He 
is now practically retired from all the heavier re- 
sponsibilities of business. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kimmell had ten children, two of 
whom died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Kimmell were 
happily married over sixty years. She passed away 
in June, igiS, and was a devout and loyal member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Of the children 
to grow up the following record is made : May, 
wife of Willis Kinnison, of Garden City, Kansas; 
Lillian, unmarried and living with her father; Jen- 
nie, wife of Doctor Shoab, of Ligonier ; Maud, wife 
of Ed Eagles, of Albion ; Thela, wife of Martin Beck, 
of Albion; Morton, unmarried and living at home; 
and Claudius, who is married and lives on his 
father's farm. 

Mr. Kimmell is a member of the Masonic Lodge 
and was formerly an Odd Fellow. In politics he 
has always been a republican since the formation 
of the party. He served four years as trustee of 
his township and for two terms was county commis- 
sioner. He was elected and served as a member 
of the Indiana Legislature in the session of 1877, 
and though renominated for that office declined to 
make the campaign. He was also nominated in 1890 
as candidate for Congress from the Twelfth Dis- 
trict, but declined the nomination. Mr. Kimmell 
is a stockholder and is president of the Cromwell 
State Bank, the other officers of which are A. Meyer, 
vice president, and Bert Tucker, cashier. He is 
also a stockholder in the Wolf Lake Bank. Mr. 
Kimmell, though not a member of that denomina- 
tion, contributed $3,000 to the building of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Kimmell, and has 
always exercised a similarly liberal spirit in behalf 
of all community undertakings. He was one of 
the organizers of the Ligonier Livestock Associa- 
tion, serving as president of the organization during 
two years of its early existence. He was for thir- 
teen years president of the Noble County Agricul- 



tural Society, and these and other positions indicate 
the high esteem in which he is held by his fellow 
citizens of that county. 

William E. Iddings. There are several careers 
of younger men in Steuben County which illustrates 
the fact that opportunities are not all gone for mak- 
ing a success of farming from small beginnings. 
One of them is that of William E. Iddings, who 
came to Northeast Indiana comparatively poor in 
purse, was at one time a farm hand, and has won 
prosperity and a large farm in Jackson Township, 
making the most of his property during the trying 
years that beset agriculture and the farmer prior 
to the present great wave of prosperity. 

Mr. Iddings was born in Belmont County, Ohio, 
July 3, 1865, and is a member of an old and promi- 
nent family in that section of Eastern Ohio along 
the Ohio Valley. His parents were Joseph and 
Teresa (Close) Iddings. His father was born in 
Jefferson County, March 25, 1836, and his mother in 
Belmont County. Her father, Josiah Close, was a 
Belmont C/Ounty farmer. The paternal grand- 
father, Joseph Iddings, also had a farm in the early 
days of Belmont County. Joseph Iddings followed 
farming in Belmont County, where his wife died 
in 1875. She was the mother of the following chil- 
dren : William E. ; John C, who was born July 6, 
1870, and now lives on the old home farm in Bel- 
mont County; and Thomas J., who was born July 
22, 1873, and was killed while on construction work 
in New York City in August, 1903. After the death 
of his first wife Joseph Iddings married Sina 
Hogue. Both are still living in Belmont County. 

William E. Iddings acquired his education in the 
public schools of Belmont County, and in April, 
1883, when about eighteen years old, came to 
Steuben County, Indiana. He farmed the first year 
in Jackson Township, and after two years worked 
out by the month. He has remained in that one 
locality, and with his hard earned savings and ex- 
perience he eventually acquired some land of his 
own, seventy acres, and with that as a start has 
built up a large and valuable homestead of 230 
acres, devoted to farming and stock raising. He is 
one of the successful hog raisers of the county, is 
a good manager, and knows how to make farming 
pleasant as well as profitable. 

October 6, 1887, Mr. Iddings married Lottie E. 
Benninghoof, a daughter of Reuben and Susan 
(Metzger) Benninghoof. They have two daughters, 
Violet W. and lona P. Violet is a graduate of the 
Flint High School and is now continuing her higher 
education in DePauw University at Greencastle, 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Iddings^ are members of the 
United Brethren Church at Pleasant View. 

Mary Thayer Ritter, M. D. The Thayer and 
Ritter families were connected with the pioneer 
life and enterprise of Steuben County. These are 
family names that have always been associated 
with the best interests of the community, and it is 
in comformity to the traditions of her ancestors 
that Mary Thayer Ritter should choose some special 
form of usefulness, and in her choice of the medical 
profession she has achieved success and for fifteen 
years has been one of the most capable members 
of her profession in Angola. 

Doctor Ritter's mother was Helen Thayer, who 
was born in Steuben Township of Steuben County 
September 14, 1843. She was a daughter of Eber 
and Amy (Golden) Thayer, both natives of New 
York State. The Thayer family came to Steuben 
County when most of the land was covered with 
heavy woods. Amy Golden Thayer became the 
mother of six children : Mrs. Fronia Carver ; Mrs. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



13 



Lucinda Kratzer ; Mrs. Emily Scoville; Mrs. Susie 
Hunter; William A. and Mrs. Helen Ritter. 

Doctor Hitter's paternal grandparents were Theo- 
bold and Catherine (.Hartzel) Ritter. They were 
Ohio people and in 1854 settled in Steuben Town- 
ship, on the land where Doctor Ritter was born. 
Theobold Ritter died in 1877 and his wife in 1869. 
Their children were Sitrion, Peter, Sarah, Margaret 
and Lucy. Theobold Ritter married for his second 
wife Ruth (Fishbaugh) Johnson, and had two sons, 
Enos and Eli. Eber Thayer also married a second 
wife, Laura Mason, and by that union had children 
named Frank, Charles, Judson and Carrie. Carrie 
was the wife of Onslow Ni.xon, and they had two 
sons in the late war. Mason E. Nixon, who as a 
member of the Signal Corps was killed in France 
October 7. 1918; and Clark Nixon, who is also in 
the Signal Corps and is still in France. 

Doctor Ritter, who was born in Steuben Town- 
ship, is a daughter of Simon and Helen (Thayer) 
Ritter. Her father, the late Simon Ritter, was 
born in Wajme Count}', Ohio, November 15, 1836, 
and came to Steuben County with his parents at 
the age of sixteen. He spent his life actively and 
usefully on the farm where his parents had settled 
and attained the good old age of nearly eighty-one. 
He died at the home of his daughter Doctor Ritter 
in Angola September 15, 1917. In 1858 he married 
Helen Thaj'er. They were the parents of thirteen 
children seven of whom grew to manhood and 
womanhood, the others dying in infancy. Mrs. 
Helen Ritter died in 1894. Both were members 
of the United Brethren Church and Siirion Ritter 
was a Republican. The names of his children were 
Charles, Amy, Loretta, Nettie, Vira, Mary, Lettie, 
Judson, Fielding, Pearl, Effie, Bertha and Guy. The 
son Pearl died in 1905 and the son Charles in 1899. 

Doctor Ritter grew up on the homestead farm, 
though from 1871 to 1875 her parents lived in 
Kansas. In 1884 they left the farm and moved to 
Angola, where Doctor Ritter attended High School 
and the Tri-State Normal College. After five years 
of successful work in teaching she took up the 
serious study of medicine, spending two years in 
the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania at 
Philadelphia, and in 1903 graduated from the Indiana 
Medical College at Indianapolis. Doctor Ritter has 
been enjoying a busy practice at Angola since April 
18, 1903. She is a member in good standing of the 
County and State Medical Associations, the Woman's 
Medical Association, and the American Medical 
Association, and is a member of the Sorosis Circle 
and of the Christian Church. 

Frf-dfrick Werner, who has been a figure in the 
business life of Steuben County for many years, 
is the present postmaster of Orland, and was the 
first incumbent of that office after it was raised to 
a third-class postoffice. 

Mr. Werner was born in Jackson County, Michi- 
gan, November 24, 1870, a son of George and 
Pauline (Nooding) Werner, both natives of Ger- 
many. His father was born in 1832 and his mother 
in 1830. George Werner came to the United States 
at the age of fifteen, reaching N-ew York City with 
only $5 in money. He was a tailor and worked at 
that trade in New York City for a time and also 
spent two years on a farm. About 1858 he moved 
to Michigan, and in that state followed farming. 
Eventually he acquired 312 acres in Jackson County, 
and was one of the prosperous men of that section. 
He retired when about sixty-five years of age and 
lived at Somerset Center in Hillsdale County until 
his death in 1915. His wife died in 1913, at the 



age of eighty-three. He was an independent demo- 
crat in politics and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He and his wife had ten chil- 
dren ; George ; Joseph, wlio died when one year 
old; Jennie; Hallie, who died in 1899; Jacob, Josie, 
Frank, John, Ernest and Frederick. 

Frederick Werner grew up on his father's farm 
in Jackson County, Michigan. He had a public 
school education and as a boy learned the trade of 
harness maker with his brother Jacob. He first 
came to Orland in i8go and opened a shop of 
his own. In 1895 he went to Quincy, Michigan, 
and engaged in the harness, agricultural implements 
and buggy business. In October, 1898, his shop was 
burned out, and then for four years he was travel- 
ing salesman for the McCormick Harvester Com- 
pany. Later he represented the Portland Ceinent 
Company of Bronson, Michigan, and for six years 
engaged in the hardware business at Orland. He 
served as postmaster when Orland was a fourth- 
class ofiice and the grade was raised to the third 
class in July, 1916. His appointment as postmaster 
bears date of December 20, 1916. Mr. Werner has 
been quite prominent in democratic politics. While 
living at Bronson, Michigan, he served as treasurer 
of Bronson Township two years, and also as town- 
ship clerk. At Quincy he was city treasurer two 
years, and was precinct committeeman when ap- 
pointed to the office of postmaster. Mr. Werner 
is affiliated with Star Lodge No. 225, Free and 
Accepted Masons, Orland Chapter No. 100, Royal 
Arch Masons, and both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Eastern Star and of the Congregational 
Church. 

In 1894 he married Miss Grace Parker, daughter 
of John and Elmlna (Luce) Parker. Her mother 
is a daughter of one of Michigan's most noted 
governors, Cyrus G. Luce. Mr. and Mrs. Werner 
have one daughter, Pauline Elmira. She was born 
December 23, 1896, and was educated in the Orland 
High School and two years in the Hillsdale College. 
She is now the wife of Lieutenant Frederick Seitz 
of Hillsdale, a son of Frederick Seitz, who for 
many years has been with the Lake Shore Railroad 
Company. Lieutenant Seitz is a graduate of Hills- 
dale College, and entered the officers' training school 
at Camp Custer, later was sent to Camp Lee of 
Virginia, and received a commission as lieutenant. 
He was honorably discharged from the army in 
February, 1919. 

Mitchell S. Campbell is the present superin- 
tendent of the County Farm of Steuben County in 
Pleasant Township. He is a young man well quali- 
fied for his administrative responsibilities, is a 
capable farmer, a vocation to which he has been 
trained since early boyhood, and is a native of Steu- 
ben County. 

He was born in Richland Township, May 27, 1887, 
a son of William and Sophronia (Haswe'll) Camp- 
bell. His parents were both born in DeKalb County, 
where the grandparents were pioneers. The paternal 
grandfather, James Mitchell Campbell, was one of 
the early settlers in that county and developed a 
farm and spent the rest of his life there. His farm 
was on Fish Creek. William Campbell was born 
in 1S48 and his wife in 1851, they were married in 
DeKalb County and in the late '70s moved to Steu- 
ben County and bought a farm in Richland Town- 
ship, where the father lived until his death in 1893. 
His widow is now living with her son Hugh in 
Richland Township. They had six children : Viola, 
deceased ; Clara ; Florence ; Lizzie ; Mitchell S. ; and 



14 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Hugh A. Hugh A. Campbell also served four years 
as superintendent of the Steuben County Farm and 
is now a resident of Richland Township. 

Mitchell S. Campbell grew up on the home place 
in Richland, acquired a district school education, 
and by practical experience has become a good 
farmer. He also took the Jesse Berry Horse Train- 
ing Course, and is well qualified to handle and 
train horses. Until his appointment to his present 
duties he was a farmer and owned thirty-three acres 
in Scott Township. In March, 1918, the County 
Board of Commissioners appointed him as superin- 
tendent of the County Farm. Mr. Campbell is a 
republican and is liberal in his religious views. 

In 1917 he married Miss Verle Holbrook, of Steu- 
ben County, daughter of Frank and Elizabeth 
(Folck) Holbrook, of Fremont, Indiana. They 
have one daughter, Mildred Elizabeth, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1918. 

Edgar J. Wilson. The prosperity which Edgar J. 
Wilson now enjoys, surrounded by his rich and pro- 
ductive acres in Millgrove Township, has! been 
earned by many years of well directed industry. At 
one time he was a farm laborer, working for a 
monthly wage, and only through thrifty habits, good 
judgment and all round business ability has ad- 
vanced to the stage of independence. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County, May 4, 1866, son of Edwin H., and 
Christina (Klink) Wilson. His mother was a 
daughter of Christian and Mary Klink, of a promi- 
nent old family of Northeast Indiana. Edwin H. 
Wilson was born in Richland County, Ohio, a son 
of John and Hannah (Bodley) Wilson, the former 
a native of New York State. John Wilson was one 
of the pioneers of the "thirties" in Steuben County, 
reaching Salem Township in 18.36. He settled near 
the Block Church, and remained the rest of his life 
in that township. His children were named Mar- 
garet, Elizabeth, Melvina, Harvey, Edwin H., and 
Rebecca. 

Edwin H. Wilson spent most of his active life as 
a farmer in Jackson Township. In 1881 he moved 
to Millgrove Township, and in 1890 retired to Mil- 
ford Township of LaGrange County, where he died. 
He and his wife had seven children, named Lillie, 
May, Edgar and Edson, twins, Edwin, Edna and 
Addie. 

Edgar J. Wilson acquired his early education in 
Jackson Township, attending the Morgan School 
and District School Number Seven, and for one year 
attended school in Millgrove Township. He left 
home and began working out for wages when six- 
teen years old, and continued in that way for a 
period of sixteen years. The first farming he did 
independently was in Millgrove Township in 1896, 
and for over twenty years he has been enjoying a 
constantly rising position of influence and pros- 
perity. He bought ninety acres there in 1904, added 
thirty-five acres a few years later, and on selling 
that first place bought his present farm of 1 10 acres 
in section 22. Since 1918 Mr. Wilson has leased 
his farm and is now practically retired. 

November 5, 1899, he married Miss Zella L. Webb, 
a daughter of Arthur and Rosana (Case) Webb. 
Her father was a native of England and the Webbs 
were early established in Steuben County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson have two daughters, Mabel and Iva. 
Mabel is the widow of Claude Brown, and has a 
daughter, Dorothy. Iva married Homer Fisher, 
and has a daughter, Mattie Lorene. 

Cyrus Kint, of Clear Lake Township, came to 
Steuben County in the role of a hard' working farm 



hand and renter, and gradually the years have 
brought him their sure reward, and he is today a 
prosperous farmer and land owner and a citizen 
entitled to the respect he enjoys. 

He was born in Williams Ccrunty, Ohio, December 
15, 1856, a son of Simon and Mary Jane (Hight) 
Kint. His father was a son of Simon Kint, Sr, 
and they cleared up 120 acres of land in Superior 
Township of Williams County. Simon Kint was 
a Republican and a member of the Reformed Church. 

Cyrus Kint was only six years old when his 
father died. At the age of thirteen he was bound 
out to John Snyder, with whom he lived a few 
years and then worked by the month on a farm 
and rented land. In 1886 he came to Steuben 
County, working for Dwight Lewis in Salem Town- 
ship and later rented William Kinser's farm for 
five years. In 1900 he acquired his first farm, 103 
acres in Clear Lake Township. He moved to the 
land in 1901. It was a tract of heavy brush land, 
and year after year he has broadened the area of cul- 
tivation, has improved it with good buildings, and 
enjoys a well earned independence. Mr. Kint is 
a Republican and a member of the Baptist Church. 

In October, 1882, he married Miss Alice E. Rogers. 
She born in Northwest Township of Williams 
County, Ohio, December 10, 1862, a daughter of 
Joseph and Alargaret (Robbins) Rogers. Her 
grandparents, Adolphus and Amelea (Whaley) 
Rogers, were pioneers in Williams County, and both 
of them spent their last years at Marion Center, 
Kansas. The old Rogers homestead today is owned 
by Lyle Shank, county superintendent of schools of 
Steuben County. Adolphus Rogers at one time was 
a merchant in Williams County, also a teacher, and 
on his farm kept an early day tavern. Joseph Rogers, 
the father of Mrs. Kint, was a farmer and died 
in Williams County in 1910, at the age of seventy- 
four. Mrs. Kint's mother is still living, aged seventy- 
five. Mrs. Kint's great-grandfather on the maternal 
side was Thomas' Whaley, a very early settler of 
Williams County who took up government land 
and made a farm of it. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kint have two children : Carl, was 
educated in the public schools, the Tri-State College, 
and took a course in the Michigan State School of 
Agriculture at Lansing. He is a practical and 
scientific farmer and lives in Clear Lake Town- 
ship, where he owns 164 acres and rents 120 
acres. He married Fannie Gowthrop, and they 
have one son, Carl Vere. Emma L. Kint, is a grad- 
uate of high school, took the teacher's course in the 
Tri-State College, and later graduated from the 
Indiana State Normal at Terre Haute. She has a 
state license, and for many years has been a success- 
ful teacher. She taught in Clear Lake six years, 
also taught in Angola six years, and is now con- 
nected with the Tri-State College. 

Charles H. Bruce has lived at Ashley for over 
a quarter of a century, and has been a man of 
great usefulness in that community. He is a lawyer 
by profession and training, for many years was in 
the railroad service at Ashley and elsewhere, and 
is now serving the town and surrounding com- 
munity effectively in the office of postmaster. 

Mr. Bruce was born in Noble County, Indiana. 
March 31, 1854, a son of Charles F. and Sarah A. 
(Hammond) Bruce. His father was born at the 
head of Skaneateles Lake in New York State in 
1823, and his mother was born in the same year 
at Lockport, New York. The paternal grandfather, 
Ezra Bruce, came to Noble County about 1838, after 
a residence in Erie, Pennsylvania, and acquired 
government land in Swan Township. Ezra and his 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



15 



wife Susannah spent their last years in Noble 
County. Charles F. Bruce was only a boy when 
brought to Noble County, and he grew up here, 
followed farming, and at one time kept the tavern 
in Swan Township. He was a whig and later a 
republican, but had no official aspirations. He was 
a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. He 
and his wife had eight children, of whom Charles 
H. is the only survivor. Two died in infancy and 
the others were named Edward, Alice, Anna, 
Luella and William. Charles F. Bruce died in 1882, 
and his widow survived him and passed away at 
the age of eighty-three. She lived at Kendallville, 
but her death occurred while visiting her son at 
Ashley. 

Charles H. Bruce spent his boyhood on the old 
homestead, and after the • public schools entered 
Oberlin College in Ohio, where he graduated in the 
law department. For a number of years he was a 
skillful telegraph operator, employed by the Wabash 
Railway Company. He was located at various 
places and at ditf'erent times was at Kalamazoo, 
Mendon and Cedar Springs in Michigan. In 1893 
he came to Ashley, where he began the practice of 
law, and for several years was also chief clerk in 
the Wabash Machine Shops. He has been one of 
the leading spirits in community affairs there. He 
served about six years as city clerk of Ashley, and 
is now serving his fifth year as postmaster. He is 
a democrat in politics and is affiliated with Ashley 
Lodge No. 614, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Ashley Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Kendallville 
Commandery, Knight Templars, and also the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his family 
attend the Christian Church. 

In 1882 Mr. Bruce tnarried Miss Lyda Chittenden 
of Lenawee County, Michigan. Their only daughter 
is Bes.'iie, a graduate of the Ashley High School and 
the wife of Jay Gage of Ashley. Mr. and Mrs. Gage 
have one child, Grace. 

Harry Black is now the active head of what is 
probably the oldest mercantile establishment at Al- 
bion, and one of the oldest in one location and 
under the direction of one family in Northeast 
Indiana. 

The Black family has been in Noble County for 
over fifty years. The ancestry goes back' several 
generations to about the time of the Revolutionary 
war, when a German boy came to this country and 
settled in Pennsylvania. This German immigrant 
was the father of Peter Black, who was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1787. Peter Black served as a loyal 
soldier in the War of 1812. His son Owen Black 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1813, and grew up in 
Richland County, Ohio. Owen Black came to 
Albion, Indiana, in 1856, and in the fall of that year 
established a partnership with Mr. Love in general 
merchandising. Three or four years later he con- 
ducted the business himself, and was at its head 
until 1862. In that year Samuel Foster became a 
member of the firm. In 1863 the store was burned 
and Owen Black then re-established the business for 
himself under the name Black & Son. This title 
was continued until 1870, when, upon the death of 
his son and business partner, another son, Jackson 
D. Black, was taken in. Finally Owen Black retired, 
and the firm was Black & Brother for a number of 
years. Finally Jackson D. Black took over the busi- 
ness alone and continued it until about 1905, when 
he took in his son, and the firm has since been con- 
ducted as J. D. Black & Son. 

Jackson D. Black was born in Richland County, 



Ohio, April 3, 1846, and died at Albion, May o, 
1916. 

Mr. Harry Black is a son of Jackson D, Black 
and was born at Albion in December, 1879. His 
brother, Albert Black, associated with the business, 
was called to the army May 15, 1918, and was aii 
instructor' at Camp Perry, Ohio, with the title of 
captam. He was discharged January, 1919, and is 
now at home in the same business. 

Harry Black married Miss Bertha Belt. They 
have three living children : Harry D., born in 1907 ; 
Marian, born in 191 1; and John, born in 1915. Mr. 
Black is a democrat in politics. The Black mer- 
cantile firm is regarded as a fixture and landmark 
at Albion, and has been doing business in one loca- 
tion for sixty-two years. 

Bertha Belt, wife of Harry Black, is the daughter 
of Edwin Belt, who came to Noble County from 
Newark, Ohio. He married Eugenia Kline, daugh- 
ter of John and Louisa (Potts) Kline. The Potts 
family were pioneers of Noble County, locating here 
more than eighty years ago. 

John 'B. Rodgers. One of the most interesting 
families of Steuben County is that of John B. 
Rodgers, a prosperous farmer of the highest stand- 
ing in the community of Jamestown Township. Mr. 
Rodgers comes of sturdy and long lived ancestry, 
tracing his descent from a victim of the English 
religious wars, John Rogers, who was burned at 
the stake. The habit of large families seems to have 
persisted in nearly all the generations of the family, 
though Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers hardly measure up 
to the earlier generations in that particular. 

Mr. Rodgers was born in Millgrove Township of 
Steuben County, May 29, 1858, son of James M. and 
Betsie (Bennett) Rodgers. His maternal grand- 
father was Daniel Bennett, a pioneer of Steuben 
County who settled in Jackson Township in 1838 
and became one of the prominent farmers and land 
owners, owning 400 acres of land. Daniel Bennett 
on May 5, 1795, married for his first wife Sally 
Sayer. Their children were Thomas, Abraham", 
Isaac, Mary, Peggie (who died in childhood), 
Samuel, Sally, Rebecca (who died in infancy), and 
Prudence. The mother of these died in 1809, and 
in the same year Daniel Bennett married Rebecca 
Norris. Daniel Bennett was the father of twenty- 
four children by these two wives, those of the 
second marriage being Mary, Peggie. Polly, Hilly, 
Daniel, Jr., Betsie, Alzina, Norris, Christopher C, 
Benjamm, Rebecca, John, Orilla, Judson, and the 
youngest died in infancy. 

In the paternal line Mr Rodgers is a grandson of 
Ithurie! Rodgers, who was born October 3, 1778. In 
1800 he married Betsie Dodge. Ithuriel Rodgers 
was a New York State farmer, and his children 
were Almena, Sabria, John A., Alphonso, William 
H. H. and James M. 

James M. Rodgers was born in New York State 
July 9, 1816. His wife, Betsie Bennett, was born 
m the same state, April 20, 1819. James Rodgers 
arrived in Jackson Township of Steuben County 
m May, 1837. bought land, but after a few years 
moved to Springfield Township in LaGrange County. 
In 1850 he. joined the tide of emigration to the gold 
coast of California, making the journey overland. 
He remained in the Far West a year and a half and 
about 1854 he moved from Springfield Township to 
Millgrove Township in Steuben County. In 1880 
he retired from his farm to the village of Orland, 
where he died March 9, 1890. His wife passed 
away April 2, 1876. They had a family of sixteen 
children, twelve of whom reached mature years. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



The names of the sixteen were Madison, Bradley, 
Antoinette, Hila, Romeo, Lodaska, Fernando, Mary 
Bell, Austin, Orvilla, Romeo, the second of the 
name, Lina, Zoe, John, Jabez and Alzina. 

John B. Rodgers as a boy attended district schools 
in Jackson and Millgrove townships, finished his 
education in the Orland High School, and has been 
farming sfnce early manhood. On October 19, 1880, 
he married Alma Hall. She was born near Nevada 
Mills in Jamestown Township, April 2, 1863, a 
daughter of James M. and Mary (Ford) Hall. Her 
father was born in 1821 and her mother in 1823. 
James M. Hall was a native of New York State and 
in 1838 went to Michigan and in 1861 settled in 
Jamestown Township of Steuben County, where he 
died in 1892. The mother of Mrs. Rodgers died 
March 4, 1907. In the Hall family were seven chil- 
dren : Maria J., John R., James, who died in child- 
hood, Thomas, William, Ida, who died in infancy, 
and Alma. Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers are members of 
the Order of Gleaners. Besides their four children 
they have a number of grandchildren. Theo M., the 
oldest of their children, married Ora Laird, and 
their family consists of Olive I., Cecil B., Robert 
W., John M., and Wilma Lorine. Maude C. Rod- 
gers is the wife of Irving A. Wickman, and their 
four children are Roger I., James A., Alma Mary 
and Herbert. Hazel M. is the wife of William D. 
Souder and she has a son, John William. Frank 
Bennett Rodgers married Ida C. Reynolds, and to 
them were born five children, Kathryn L., Lucile 
M., Bennett, who died in childhood. Earl and Wil- 
ford J. 

George Franklin Slick, whose home is in Jackson 
Township of Steuben County, has grown crops in 
that part of Northeast Indiana for thirty years or 
more, and his own record is a worthy contribution 
to a family history which has been associated with 
this county from the earliest pioneer times. 

Mr. Slick was born just east of the Block Church, 
on the farm now owned by Dell Wood, on January 
30, 1856. He is a son of Holister and Lavina (Shaf- 
stahl) Slick. Holister Slick was born in Rochester 
County, New York, April 23, 1827, a son of John 
and Mary (Hempstead) Slick. John Slick was a 
soldier in the War of 1812, so that the American 
record of this family goes back more than a century. 
John Slick brought his family to Steuben County 
in 1840 and settled south of Salem Center, acquiring 
forty acres of government land. He and his wife 
spent their last days in that locality. 

Holister Slick was about thirteen years old when 
brought to Steuben County, finished his education 
there, like most of the family, took up farming as 
his vocation. He owned fifty acres east of the 
Block Church, and lived there in comfortable circum- 
stances until his death on August 15, igog, at the 
age of eighty-two. His wife who died September 30, 
1908, at the age of seventy-five, was born in Crawford 
County, Ohio, December 24, 1832. She was a daugh- 
ter of Christian and Christina Shafstahl, who came 
to Steuben County in 1846. Christian Shafstahl, who 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1807, on moving to 
Steuben County settled in Salem Township and lived 
there until his death in 1880. A number of his 
children became well known and prominent in this 
part of Northeast Indiana. 

Holister Slick and wife were the parents of nine 
children: Sarah, deceased, George F., Alice, Nancy, 
Adam, Christina, Mary, Susan and William. 

George Franklin Slick grew up on his father's 
farm and started life with a public school education. 
The first land he owned was forty acres in Salem 
Township. After selling that he bought eighty-five 
acres in Jackson Township, improved it with good 



buildings, and on April 7, 1917, bought his present 
place of thirty-six acres. He has always been pro- 
gressive in the matter of improvements, and in the 
spring of 1919 was engaged in the erection of his 
fifth barn, having put up four other barns on the 
other farms he owned. 

April 12, 1883, Mr. Slick married Miss Emma 
Green. She was born in Pleasant Township of 
Steuben County May 22, 1861, a daughter of Marvin 
and Flora (Jones) Green. Her father was born 
in Medina County, Ohio, September 6, 1833, and 
her mother in Licking County of the same state 
in 1836. The Green family came to Steuben County 
in i837i when Marvin was four years old. His 
parents were John and Louisa Green, who as 
pioneers settled on land in Pleasant Township which 
is now the Henry Jordan farm. John Green and wife 
both spent the rest of their days in that locality. 
Mrs. Slick's father after growing to manhood bought 
a farm of 113 acres in Scott Township, and he died 
in Fremont in 1912. His widow is still living at the 
age of eighty-three. In the Green family were the 
following children : Lewis, Ella and Emma, twins, 
Klmer. deceased, Sarah, Matilda, Bert and Charles. 
Mrs. Slick's maternal grandparents were Ziba and 
Flora Jones, likewise identified with the early set- 
tlement of Steuben County, and more particularly 
mentioned in connection with other branches of the 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Slick had four children. 
Ella is the wife of John Ritter. Nellie is the wife 
of Shermie German, and their children are Emma 
Paulina, who died in infancy, Violet, Rajmond, 
Gladys and Evelyn. The son William married Ona 
German, and they have a son, Lawrence. Ethel 
is the wife of Francis Wyatt and has one child. 
Max. 

Martin M. Burch has been longer in business as 
a merchant at Metz than any of his present com- 
petitors and associates. For over thirty years he 
has sold goods and furnished an adequate mercan- 
tile service in his particular line, and enjoys an 
enviable reputation in commercial circles. 

Mr. Burch was born in Otsego Township of Steu- 
ben County August 11, i860, son of Halbert C. and 
Mary (Rhinehart) Burch, and a grandson of Ches- 
ter Burch. Chester Burch was born in Vermont 
March 22, 1810, a son of Oliver and Anna Burch. 
In 1825' his parents moved to Washington County, 
Ohio, where he grew up and where in 1831 he 
married Polly Davis. She was born in that Ohio 
county April 4, 1812. Chester Burch was one of 
the early pioneers of Steuben County, Indiana, 
arriving in the year 1837. Three years later he 
bought eighty acres in section 10 of Otsego Town- 
ship, and lived there until his death on January 26, 
1879. He was one of the leading members of the 
Christian Church in that township. He and his 
wife had seven children. 

Halbert C. Burch was born in New York State, 
but was reared and educated in Otsego Tow^nship. 
He served three years and three months in the 
Union army, and then returned home and took up 
farming. His career was terminated at the age of 
thirty-eight, in 1872, when he was accidentally 
killed by being thrown from a wagon. His widow 
survived him many years and passed away at the 
age of seventy-two. Halbert Burch was a republi- 
can and a member of the Christian Church. He 
and his wife had four children : Martin M., Eugene, 
Lorenzo and John Chester. 

Martin M. Burch grew up on a farm in Otsego 
Township, had a public school education and was 
busily engaged as a farmer until 1886. He came to 
Metz in that year and opened a harness shop and 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



17 



later expanded into a general store, and has been 
in business at the old stand now for over thirty 
years. 

Mr. Biirch has taken an active interest in local 
affairs, is a republican, a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Christian Church 
and works for every worthy movement. 

In 1879 he married Miss Deetle Woodcox. She 
was born in DeKalb County, Indiana, December 26, 
1862, daughter of Curtis and Mary (Morrell) Wood- 
cox. Her parents were early settlers of DeKalb 
County. Her father died at Millersburg, Indiana, 
in 1890, at the age of fifty-two and her mother in 
1873. aged thirty-two. There were five children in 
the Woodcox family: Martin, Deetle, George, Bell 
and Blanche, all of whom are still living. Curtis 
\\ oodcox married for his second wife Sarah Green- 
wood, and they had two children, Frank and Nelson. 
His first wife was Ida Spears, and she became the 
mother of one son. Glen. Mrs. Burch's father 
moved to Metz in 1872, and was successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in and around 
that village until about six years before his death. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burch are the parents of five 
children : Clara, the oldest, is the wife of William 
Miller and has a son, named Willis. Meda is the 
widow of Zach Pillsbury and has a son, Marion. 
X'irgil married Naomi Lindow and has two sons, 
\'irgil and Lindow. Floyd enlisted in May, 1918, 
in the National army and in the spring of 1919 
was at Camp Grant, Illinois. He married Louise 
Loweren. Marie, the youngest child of Mr. and 
Mrs. Burch, is clerk in the Stiefel store at Angola. 

A. Howard Smith represents a family that has 
been identified with the agricultural community of 
Noble County for over half a century, and his own 
efforts as an agriculturist have given him a sub- 
stantial reputation in several communities, chiefly 
in Perry Township, where he owns one of the good 
farms, located a mile and a half east of Ligonier. 

He was born in Elkhart Township of Noble 
County, July 2, 1S71, son of Abraham H. and Mary 
E. (Dumm) Smith. His father and mother were 
both born in Licking County, Ohio, the former on 
August 18, 1841, and the latter in 1843. They were 
married at Brownsville, Ohio, and in 1864 came to 
Noble County and located in Elkhart Township. 
They had their home in that community for many 
years, developed a good farm, and in 1901 retired and 
removed to Ligonier, where the mother died in 
191 1 and the father in 1915. They were very active 
members of the Primitive Baptist Church, the father 
serving as clerk of the church. He was a democrat 
in politics. There were nine children in the family, 
one of whom died in infancy. Those to grow up 
were: Charles L. ; Emma L., wife of Curtis Cole; 
Ella M., wife of Dr. A. J. Hostettler, of LaGrange; 
Frank R.. deceased; A. Howard; Bruce, who is a 
conductor with the New York Centra! lines ; Edwin 
D., of Ligonier; and Edith M., wife of Walter Rob- 
inson, of Ligonier. 

A. Howard Smith grew up on the home farm in 
Elkhart Township and had a district scliool educa- 
tion. After leaving school he remained with his 
father helping to till the fields and carry on the 
work of the farm until he was thirty years of age. 

In October, 1894, Mr. Smith married Lillie 
Schwab. She died in 1895. On March 12, 1901, he 
married Minnie Burket. Mrs. Smith was born in 
Perry Township and had a common school educa- 
tion. After their marriage they lived for three 
years in Elkhart Township, and in 191 1 moved to 
their present farm of 112 acres in Perry Township. 
Vol. 11—2 



They also own thirty-four acres in Elkhart Town- 
ship. This is a valuable property, and represents to 
a large degree the earnest efforts of Mr. Smith 
since he started life on his own responsibility. He 
and his wife have one daughter, Mildred M., born 
May 15, 1905, and now attending school. Mr. 
Smith keeps good grades of livestock of all kinds 
and is a stockholder in the Farmers Co-operative 
Elevator at Ligonier. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees and the Eagles, and is a 
democrat. 

Ross McNett. More than seventy years have 
passed since the McNett family became settled in 
Steuben County. As a family they have been hard 
workers, successful farmers, earnest citizens and 
always identified with the religious and moral forces 
of their communities. Of the third generation Ross 
McNett is "a representative, a capable and progres- 
sive young farmer in Jamestown Township. 

He was born on the farm where he lives today, 
August 29. 1882. The founder of the family in this 
county was his grandfather, Jacob McNett, who was 
born in Greene County, Ohio, May 21, 1824. He 
grew up in Logan County, Ohio, and in 1846 came 
to Steuben County and lived for three years on 
Jackson Prairie, and in 1849 located on the west 
bank of Lake Gage, and remained a resident of that 
neighborhood until his death in 1880. He owned a 
farm of 180 acres and had the physical ability and 
power to give a good account of himself as a farmer 
and \vas a man of strong will and great Christian 
spirit and for many years was an active leader in 
the Methodist Church. He married at the age of 
twenty-one Mary Jane Rock, and they had seven 
children : Sarahett, who died in childhood ; George 
Sylvester; J. C. ; Marietta; Orpha, who died in 
childhood ; and John and Jane, twins. 

George Sylvester McNett was born in Millgrove 
Township, March 6, 1848, and spent his life in 
Steuben County. He began farming in Millgrove, 
later lived in Jamestown Township, and for many 
years had his home on the farm now occupied by 
his son, Ross. He died April 22, 1903. He was 
active in public affairs, serving four years as town- 
ship assessor, and completed one term as county 
commissioner and was on his second term at the 
time of his death. George S. McNett married for 
his first wife Gelane Miller, who died leaving one 
son, George. For his second wife he married Eliza 
Arnold, who was born in New York State, October 
20, 1851. She is the mother of two children. Lulu, 
wife of Ray Terry, and Ross. 

Ross McNett acquired his education in the dis- 
trict schools of Jamestown Township. For two 
years, 1906-08, he lived with his mother in Angola, 
but with that exception has spent all his life on 
the home farm. He owns fifty acres under contract 
for sole ownership at the death of his mother, also 
a tract of eighty acres. He is a successful general 
farmer and stock raiser. 

December 11, 1907. he married Lillie May, a 
daughter of Albert and Catherine Mav. They have 
four children, named Mildred, Mabe'l, Melvin and 
Merle. 

Orda B. Galloway is a native of Northeast In- 
diana, his people having been pioneers in Noble 
County, and after a number of years of successful 
practice as a dentist in his native county he moved 
to Steuben County, and is now enjoying a large 
practice and well satisfied clientele at Angola. 

He was born south of Ligonier, near Cromwell, 
November 25, 1878, son of Anderson and Harriet 
(Miller) Galloway. The Galloway family came 



18 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



originally to Northeast Indiana from Greene County, 
Ohio, and acquired extensive tracts of wild land in 
Noble County. Doctor Galloway's grandfather was 
Joseph Galloway. Anderson Galloway was reared 
and educated in Noble County, and for many years 
was one of the succesful farmers of that locality. 
He and his wife now live retired at the Village of 
Cromwell. He was born March 12, 1840, and his 
wife July 5, 1845. He is one of the ardent repub- 
licans of Noble County, is a member of the Masonic 
Order and his wife is active in the Lutheran Church. 
They had a family of ten children : Groase, Clara, 
Etta, Prentice, Cora, Serepta, Verna, Orda B., Ora 
and Oakley. Prentice, Cora, Serepta and Verna are 
deceased. 

Orda B. Galloway grew up on his father's farm at 
Cromwell and lived there until he was about twenty- 
one years of age. His education began in the district 
schools, was continued in the high school at Crom- 
well, and for two and a half years he was a 
student in Hillsdale College in Michigan. He re- 
ceived his degree Doctor of Dental Surgery at the 
Dental College of Indianapolis in 1905. He at once 
returned to his home locality at Cromwell to begin 
his professional work, and had a good business 
there for ten years. In 1915 he moved to Pleasant 
Lake and in the fall of 1918 opened his offices in 
Angola. Doctor Galloway is a republican and 
attends the Congregational Church at Angola. In 
191S he married Mrs. Frank Mayfield, of Noble 
County. Her one son by her former marriage, Jack 
Mayfield, is now thirteen years old. 

J. Clifton McNaughton, though a native of 
Branch County, Michigan, has spent most of his 
life in Steuben County and is a member of a family 
that came here in pioneer days, establishing a home 
in the wilderness more than fourscore years ago. 

The pioneer head of the family was his grand- 
father, Alexander McNaughton, a native of New 
York State, who married Maria Crawford, also of 
the same state. Alexander McNaughton, accom- 
panied by his wife and four children, made the 
long journey by ox team and wagon from New 
York to Fremont Township of Steuben County in 
1836. Only the previous year had the first home 
been built in that township. They settled on a 
piece of wild land two miles south of the present 
Village of Ray. Alexander McNaughton sold that 
land a few years later and bought 160 acres in 
section 13. The Village of Ray stands on part of 
that quarter section. Alexander McNaughton spent 
the rest of his life there as a farmer, ancl he platted 
the Village of Ray and gave its its first impulse 
toward growth. His children were named Eliza, 
Joseph, Archibald, Robert. Maria and Sarah Jane. 
The wife of Alexander McNaughton died March 
30, 1867, and he passed away January 24, 1884. 

Robert McNaughton was born in New York State 
and was a small child when brought to Steuben 
County. After getting his education he taught school 
in Fremont Township, made his first efforts as a 
farmer in the same locality, and after a few years 
moved to California Township in Branch County, 
Michigan. When the railroad was built and the Vil- 
lage of Ray came into existence, he was one of the 
first men on the ground and established a general 
store and had his home in the village. He con- 
tinued as a merchant there for about thirteen years. 
He and his brother Archibald also built the first 
grain elevator. From Ray he moved to Jamestown 
Township, living there about three years. His 
second wife died in Jamestown and soon afterward 
he took up his home with his son J. Clifton, and 
died there. Robert McNaughton married for his 



first wife Carrie Lathrope. She was the mother of 
one son, Delbert. His second wife was Jane Duguid, 
a daughter of John and Helen (Stewart) Duguid. 
To that union were born nine children, three of 
whom died in childhood. Those to reach mature 
years were Kent, Charles B., Alma, who died when 
a young woman, J. Clifton and Elton. 

J. Clifton McNaughton was born in Branch 
County, Michigan, October 31, 1877, and attended 
his first schools in that county. For one term he 
was a student in a school in Fremont Township. 
As a boy he worked on his father's farm, but since 
early manhood has been concentrating his efforts 
upon the place where he now lives. He owns 160 
acres in section 13 of Fremont Township, and his 
friends and neighbors speak of him as one of the 
most efficient young farmers in that locality. 

Mr. McNaughton married in 1897 Bertha Handy, 
a daughter of Spencer and Sarah (Kaylor) Handy. 
They have two children. Lorene is a graduate of 
Fremont High School and has taken work in the 
International Business College at Fort Wayne. Clay- 
ton, the son, is also a graduate of the Fremont 
High School. 

Mrs. Marium E. Campbell. It was in 1847 that 
the early members of the Campbell and Childs fam- 
ilies came to DeKalb County, Indiana. They have 
been quiet, thrifty people and always identified with 
the development of the county in a worthy way. 
The late Edward Campbell was long one of the 
county's honored and representative citizens. 

Edward Campbell was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
in 1841, hence was six years old when he accom- 
panied his parents, Abel and Jane (Taylor) Camp- 
bell, in May, 1847, to Indiana and settled in Smith- 
field Township, DeKalb County. They had six sons 
and two daughters. Abel Campbell died on an his- 
toric day of the nation's history, the same on which 
Abraham Lincoln was first elected President of the 
United States. Edward Campbell remained on the 
home farm and looked after the comfort of his 
widowed mother and subsequently became the owner 
of the farm and continued its operation for many 
years. His death occurred there on March 7, 1914, 
and by loving friends and with Masonic rites, he 
was laid to rest in the family plot in the Waterloo 
cemetery. 

On May 4, 1865, Edward Campbell was united in 
marriage to Marium E. Childs, whose parents, 
Bleeker E. and Jane A. (Wood) Childs, came from 
Wayne County, New York, to DeKalb County, In- 
diana, settling in Fairfield Township, the family 
consisting of three sons and five daughters, Mrs. 
Campbell at this time, September, 1847, being three 
years old. She grew up in Fairfield Township, at- 
tended school diligently and fitted herself for teach- 
ing and later taught schools in Fairfield, Smithfield 
and Waterloo, and has always been a lady whose in- 
tellectual acquirements have been recognized in the 
family and in society. Five children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell on the pleasant old farm in 
Smithfield Township, namely: Frank, Elnora, Al- 
bertus, Clark and Thomas. Frank married Almira 
Buchanan, and they have one son, Robert Leander. 
Elnora, who is deceased, was the wife of Oliver 
Hinman, and is survived by one daughter, Willo 
Hinman. Albertus married Laura Walker, and they 
have two sons, Edward and Jeremiah E. Clark 
married Mrs. Dora (Walker) Kelley. Thomas re- 
sides with his mother at Waterloo, to which city 
Mrs. Campbell removed shortly after Mr. Camp- 
bell's death, although she still retains the ownership 
of the old Smithfield homestead of 200 acres. Mrs. 
Campbell is. a member of the United Brethren Church 



mmf'^f^. 




<^yi^ <^1^ (?£-'r:^x^-iC~^(^ 



HISTORY OF NORTH KAST IXDIAXA 



at Waterloo and takes an interested part in its many 
avenues of useful beneficence. 

The early members of the Campbell and Childs 
families considered politics not only a necessary part 
of good citizenship, but the male voters of those 
days were apt to be emphatic partisans. In both 
families the whig element prevailed, but when the 
republican party was organized, its principles proved 
more acceptable. At the present time Albertus Camp- 
bell is serving as a member of the Board of County 
Commissioners of DeKalb, being one of the few re- 
publicans in this county so honored. 

The late Edward Campbell joined the Masonic 
Lodge at Auburn and ever afterward he was a 
member in good standing. He was faithful in all 
observances and for years never missed a lodge 
meeting, traveling the seven miles to Auburn on 
every occasion no matter what might be the con- 
dition of the weather. By transfer he later became 
a charter member of Waterloo lodge. On the fiftieth 
anniversary of his becoming a Mason, brethren of 
the Auburn and Waterloo lodges celebrated the event 
and because of Mr. Campbell's feeble health at the 
time, went in a body to his farm, where, with ap- 
propriate and beautiful ceremony, they presented 
him with a Masonic emblem that signifies great and 
special honor. During the remaining year of his 
life Mr. Campbell prized this mark of appreciation 
and friendship as one of his dearest treasures, and it 
is equally prized by his eldest son, Frank, also a 
Mason, upon whom his mother bestowed it. Mrs. 
Campbell has a wide acquaintance in the county and 
at Waterloo, and is held in the highest esteem every- 
where. 

Capt. Georgk H. Cosper. For many years a re- 
tired resident of Hamilton, Capt. George H. Cosper 
spent his active years chiefly in DeKalb County and 
went from that locality when a youth to serve in the 
Union army during the Civil war. The Cosper fam- 
ily established itself in the wilds of DeKalb County 
three quarters of a century ago, and of the names 
longest identified with that locality that of Capt. 
George H. Cosper is held the highest honor. 

He was born in Chemung County, New York, 
July 2, 1842, a son of Charles and Lucinda (Weeks) 
Cosper. His father was born in Pennsylvania in 
1808 and his mother in Vermont in 181 2. They 
married in New York State and in 1844 came West 
by such means of conveyance as were then available 
and secured Government land in Wilmington Town- 
ship of DeKalb County. A log house was their first 
home in the wilderness, and successive years brought 
them increased material circumstances and comfort. 
About the beginning of the Civil war Charles Cosper 
left Indiana and went to Minnesota. He died at 
Glenville in that state in 1872. His widow then 
returned to Steuben County and lived at Hamilton 
until her death in October, 1893. Mr. Cosper was 
a whig and republican in politics and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He and his wife 
had the following children : Ransom, Elizabeth, 
Emeline, Mary, Wesley, Catharine, George H., Amy, 
James, Lucretia, Martha and Henry. Those still 
living are Emeline, Catharine, George, Amy, James, 
Lucretia, Martha and Henry. 

George H. Cosper spent his boyhood in the woods 
of Wilmington Township and acquired his educa- 
tion largely through study at home and as oppor- 
tunity ofifcred. There were few good public schools 
in his early youth. In the first summer of the 
Civil war he enlisted in Company F of the Forty- 
Fourth Indiana as a private. He was in camp two 
months before he was sworn in and mustered on 
September 21, i85i. He saw nearly four years of 



service, receiving his honorable discharge Septem- 
ber 14, 1865. He was in all the battles of the Forty- 
Fourth Regiment, and was promoted to the rank of 
captain. He received a shot in the face at Shiloh, 
and was again wounded at Stone River. 

The war over, Captain Cosper returned to DeKalb 
County and was engaged in farming until 1885, 
when he sold his place and bought property in the 
Village of Hamilton, where he has enjoyed the com- 
forts that are his due for his record as a soldier 
and his industry as a citizen. Captain Cosper has 
always been a stanch republican, but has never 
sought office. However, while in DeKalb County 
he served as constable. He is present commander of 
Leman Griffith Post No. 387 of the Grand' Army 
of the Republic, and is a member of the United 
Brethren Church. 

February 18, 1864, he married Miss Evaline Dir- 
rim. She was born in DeKalb County, April 17, 
1845, where her parents, Isaac and Eleanor (Wycoflf) 
Dirrim, had settled in the preceding February. Her 
parents developed a farm in that county, but spent 
their last years in Hamilton, where her father died 
in 1802 and her mother in 1000. There were ten 
children in the Dirrim family : Sarah, Eliza, Han- 
nah, Evaline, Cyrus, Lavina, Peter, Martha, Mary 
and Ida. Those still living are Eliza, Evaline, La- 
vina, Peter and Mary. 

Captain and Mrs. Cosper have had a happy mar- 
ried life for fifty-five years, having celebrated their 
golden wedding anniversary in 1914. With five 
children of their own they have seen numerous 
grandchildren grow up around them. Their oldest 
child, Marshall, was educated in the public schools 
and is now a farmer in Otsego Township of Steu- 
ben County. He married Ida Sanxtcr, and their 
children are Harley, Lena, George, Pearl and Addie. 
The second child of Mr. and Mrs. Cosper was 
named Addie, and died at the age of six years. 
Florence is the wife of Monroe Garber, of Quincy, 
Michigan, and they have three children, Lola, Floyd 
and John. Mary was first married to Ernest Wright, 
by which union she had two daughters, named Anna 
and Alta, and is now the wife of Elmer Wideman, 
of Detroit, Michigan. By her second marriage she 
has two sons, Albert and George. Leona is the 
wife of Fred Spurling, station agent at Hamilton. 
Slic has reared one of her sister Mary's children, 
.Alta, who is now attending high school. 

Charles H. Turner has been one of the busy and 
useful men of Steuben County for a great many 
years, and the greater part of his eflforts and ex- 
perience has been applied to developing a farm 
which his father once owned in Millgrove Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Turner was born in that township, November 
2, 1862, son of William W. and Susan (Salisbury) 
Turner. His mother was born in Steuben County 
in 1839, daughter of a prominent pioneer, Chester 
D. Salisbury. The record of the Salisbury family 
will be found on other pages. William W. Turner 
was born in Connecticut in 1831, a son of Joseph 
and Sally Anna (Horlon) Turner. Sally Anna 
Horton was born in Coldbrook, New Hampshire, 
in 1805. Joseph Turner was a shoemaker by trade 
and followed that occupation for many years in 
New York State. Wiliam W. Turner when about 
eighteen years of age, in 1848 came from New York 
to Indiana, settling in Millgrove Township of 
Steuben County. He lived with his older brother, 
Nathan, for a time, worked out for other farmers, 
and after a few years bought a piece of wild land 
in section 14. Some of it had been cleared, but he 
put up his first buildings among the trees and worked 



20 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



along steadily increasing the area of cultivation 
and giving the farm other improvements until he 
had a valuable place of 152 acres. He and his wife 
had three children: Charles H., Myrtle, wife of 
C. O. Jones, and Julia M., wife of C. C. Mitchell. 

Charles H. Turner, only son of his parents, ac- 
quired his education in the Turner School of Mill- 
grove Township, graduated from the high school 
at Orland, and for two winter terms he taught in 
one of the country districts. He was in the old 
home with his parents until 1895, in which year he 
built his present commodious residence and has been 
farming independently there for a quarter of a 
century. He owns 180 acres in sections 14 and 23, 
and does general farming and stock raising. Like 
his father he is a member of the Grange. 

Mr. Turner married in 1894 Lucy M. Shutts, a 
daughter of Herman C. and Mary (Collins) Shutts. 
Her father came to Steuben County in i860, and 
some of the important facts in his family history 
are published on other pages. Mr. and Mrs. Turner 
have three children: Hilda M., born in 1895, is a 
graduate of the Orland High School and of the 
South Bend Business College; Marian H., born in 
1900, is a graduate of high school and is the wife 
of Lyston C. Keyes ; and Willa S., who was born 
in 1910. 

Thom.\s a. Parker. The County Farm advisor 
for Steuben County is Thomas A. Parker, who has 
spent practically all his life in this section of North- 
eastern Indiana. He was born in Kosciusko County, 
a son of Elijah J. and Ada Mary (Orr) Parker. 
His father was born in Kosciusko County and his 
mother at Westminster, Ohio. His father is still 
farming in Kosciusko, and on the home farm Thomas 
A. Parker grew up. He is a graduate of the Warsaw 
High School and received his degree Bachelor of 
Science from Winona College in 1915. He also 
graduated in 1917 from the College of Liberal Arts 
at Winona. 

Mr. Parker was formerly a teacher in the high 
school at Pierceton, Indiana, and for one year 
taught in the Vocational School at Metz. In March, 
1918, he was appointed county agricultural agent 
of Steuben County, and took up the duties of that 
office in the same year, and all through the critical 
season of 1918, when American agriculture meant 
so much to the world welfare, he was busy doing 
his part in the agricultural communities of Steuben 
County. 

He is a member of the Rotary Club of Angola, 
is a Baptist, and a Mason and Knight of Pythias. 
In January, 1917, Mr. Parker married Esther H. 
Parker, daughter of Murray and Margaret (Morris) 
Parker. They have one son, Thomas A., Jr., born 
May 27, 1918. 

Emmet B. Chard is a successful farmer of Scott 
Township, who has applied himself not only to his 
individual labors as a producer, but also to some 
of those broad movements and efforts now affecting 
for the better agricultural conditions and the inter- 
ests of farmers. 

Mr. Chard was born in Richland Township of 
Steuben County January 11, 1885, a son of Robert 
and Dorcas (Thompson) Chard of Angola. He 
grew up on a farm as a boy, attended public schools 
and the Tri-State Norma! College, and has taken 
the short course in agriculture at Purdue Uni- 
versity. Since early manhood he has given his best 
energies and study to farming, and is now making 
a success of the management of the 200-acre farm 
owned by his father in Scott Township. His father 
bought this place February 22, 1899. Mr. Chard is 
a breeder of Shorthorn cattle and Percheron horses. 



He is a member of the Angola Co-operative Ship- 
pers Association and was formerly identified with 
the Valley Shippers Association. He is also active 
in the Bate Farmers Club, composed of twelve 
families and holding social and business meetings 
once a month. He has served as chairman of the 
club. In politics he is a republican and is a member 
of the Christian Church, 

December 31, 1909, Mr. Chard married Miss Pearl 
Beard, daughter of Gates and Louise Beard of 'Scott 
Township. They had two children : Esther, who 
died in infancy, and Robert Gates, born June 9, 
1915. 

Albert F. Straw. The enterprise of the Straw 
brothers at Fremont is a reflection of the increasing 
interest paid to the dairy business in Steuben Coun- 
ty. Straw brothers operate a model creamery and 
are also manufacturers of ice cream in large quan- 
tities, a delicious product that is distributed over 
many towns around Fremont. 

The Straw family was one of the first to locate at 
the Village of Fremont, and three generations have 
lived there. The first generation was headed by 
Frederick Straw, who was born in Dauphin County. 
Pennsylvania, June 9, 181 1, a son of George and 
Elizabeth Straw. In 1832 Frederick married Cath- 
erine Wagner, who was born in Cumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1813. They came with their chil- 
dren to Indiana in the spring of 1856 and bought 
land just west of the present site of the depot at 
Fremont, which then contained only a store and a 
blacksmith shop. Frederick Straw cleared up most 
of his land from the heavy timber and improved a 
farm of 180 acres. His wife died June 17, 1871, 
and he passed away about 1891. He was a Jackson 
democrat until the republican party was formed, 
after which he was one of its firm adherents. Fred- 
erick Straw and wife were the parents of eight chil- 
dren. 

One of them was Elias Straw, who was born in 
Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1834, 
and was married there in 1855 to Catherine Baker. 
She was born in the same county in 1839, a daughter 
of Frederick Baker. Elias Straw came to Steuben 
County at the same time with his father and bought 
a tract of land in section 28. Later he bought an- 
other place and for many years was successfully 
identified with farming. He was a republican in 
politics, but his chief interest outside of his farm 
and family was the Evangelical Church. He organ- 
ized a society of that denomination near his home, 
and was very attentive to his duties as a church 
man, being class leader for many years. He and 
his wife had the following children: William R. ; 
John, who died at the age of thirteen; Albert F. ; 
Granville E. ; George W. ; Augusta, who died at 
the age of two years ; Harvey H. ; and Herman, who 
is associated with his brother Albert in the creamery 
business as a member of the firm Straw Brothers. 

Albert F. Straw was born in Fremont Township, 
January 6, 1861, and spent his boyhood days on a 
farm, attending the local public schools. For many 
years he has been a practical farmer and owns a 
place of 104 acres in Fremont Township, besides 
property in the village. In 1913 the Straw Brothers 
Creamery was built at Fremont, and since that time 
it has consumed a large part of the dairy products 
in that locality. The brothers are very enterprising 
business men and know their special line thoroughly. 

Mr. Straw is a republican and a member of the 
Evangelical Church. In 1889 he married Mary 
Ackerman. She died in 1894, leaving no children. 
In 1899 he married Belle Wise, who died in 1902. 
Mr. Straw married for his present wife in 1904 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Linnie Friday. They have three children, Arva, 
X'irgil and Clifton. 

Lewis A. Keeslar. While Mr. Keeslar for over 
thirty years has been identified with the farming 
and community interests of Steuben County, his 
home is still close to the locality of his birth, over 
the state line in the historic Gilead Township of 
Branch County, Michigan. He represents some of 
the old and prominent families of Southern Michi- 
gan, people who developed that region from a wil- 
derness of swamps, woods and "oak openings." 

Mr. Keeslar was born in Gilead Township, July 
9, 1858, and is a son of William and Sally (Green) 
Keeslar. Peter Keeslar, his grandfather, was born 
in New York State in 1800 and died in 1887. He 
arrived in Gilead Township of Branch County in 
1836, entering ninety acres of timbered land. He 
put all the buildings and other improvements on the 
farm and lived there until his death. His children 
were Joseph, Wiliam, George and Clarissa by his 
first wife and by a second marriage he had children 
named Charles, Daniel, John, Mary and Jennie. 

On the maternal side Lewis A. Keeslar is related 
to an even older pioneer family of Gilead Township. 
His maternal grandfather was David Green, who 
married Maranda Checker. Both the Greens and 
the Keeslars were remarkable for much of the de- 
velopment that has transformed a beautiful region 
of Southern Michigan into beautiful farms and 
homes. They lived in the same community where 
Bishop Chase, the first Episcopal bishop west of 
the Alleghany Mountains, had his home in old 
Gilead Township. 

William Keeslar, who was born in New York 
State in 1827, and died February 15, 1912, spent 
many years as a farmer in Gilead, beginning with 
forty acres of wild land which he paid for by money 
earned at work by the month. The first forty acres 
he increased to the extent of 120 acres, and in 1874 
left his farm and spent one winter in Coldwater 
and then moved to a farm near Burr Oak, where 
he remained nine years. In 1884 he bought 115 
acres in Millgrove Township of Steuben County, 
Indiana, and lived there until his death. His wife, 
who was a native of Seneca County, New York, 
died July 8, 1900. Their children were five in num- 
ber, two of whom died in infancy. Those to reach 
mature years were Louisa C, Lewis A. and Al- 
fred R. 

Lewis A. Keeslar acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Gilead Township, attended school 
in Coldwater one winter, and finished his education 
at Burr Oak. He has been farming in Millgrove 
Township for over thirty years, and made his first 
purchase of twenty acres in section 16 of that town- 
ship in 1888. Gradually as a result of many years 
of toil and good management his property has 
grown until it now comprises 175 acres, ninety-five 
in Millgrove Township and eighty acres across the 
line in Gilead Township of his native county. It is 
divided into two farms, and on one of these Mr. 
Keeslar has erected practically all of the substantial 
buildings. In recent years the heavier responsibili- 
ties of managing these places have developed upon 
his two sons. 

Mr. Keeslar married June 18, 1881, Miss Jennie 
D. Cross, daughter of Leonard and Asenath (Ar- 
nold) Cross. Their two sons are Glenn and Carl. 
Glenn married Janet Gillis and has three children, 
Orion, Evelyn and Duane. Carl married Bessie 
Berry, and their family consists of Donald, George, 
Helen and Ray. 

DeWitt Ewers, who for a third of a century has 
been identified with the business of brick manufac- 



ture and is manager of the Angola Brick & Tile 
Company, one of the largest industries of its kind 
in Northeast Indiana, is a native of Steuben County, 
and represents several of the oldest families estab- 
lished here, including the Stockers and Sowles. 

He was born in Pleasant Township December 2i, 
1869, a son of Sylvester and Estella (Stocker) Ewers, 
who were also natives of Pleasant Township, the 
father born in 1845 and the mother in 1854. The 
paternal grandparents were James Benjamin and 
Harriet (Sowle) Ewers. Harriet Sowle was born 
January 7, 1814, and was one of a number of this 
family to become identified with the earliest pioneer 
development in Pleasant Township. James B. Ewers 
and wife were married in Ashland County, Ohio, 
and came to Steuben County in 1838. The Sowle 
ancestry goes back 700 years in English annals 
and to the year 1140 in France. James B. Ewers 
was a cooper by trade and died in 1872, at the age 
of sixty-two, while his widow survived him until 
1898. Of their fifteen children only one is now 
living, Mrs, Melissa Dixon of Sparta, Wisconsin. 

Mr. DeWitt Ewers' maternal grandparents were 
Leland Howard and Lucy (Mallory) Stocker, the 
former a native of Vermont. They were also among 
the early settlers of Steuben County. 

Sylvester Ewers received a public school education 
and learned the trade of brick mason. In the '70s 
he also took up the manufacture of brick and in 
1879 moved to Jamestown and in 1880 to Angola, 
where he started a brick yard, which was the primary 
industry now known as the Angola Brick & Tile 
Company. For a number of years he was associated 
with his brother Ora under the name Ewers brothers, 
brick manufacturers. He bought out his brother's 
interests in 1889 and continued the business until 
1893, when it was incorporated as the Angola Brick 
& Tile Company. Sylvester Ewers owned three- 
sevenths of the stock in that corporation. He con- 
tinued giving his time and attention to his business 
aflfairs until his death on July 9, 1910. He was a 
good business man and an equally good citizen and 
helped make the City of Angola what it is today. 
Politically he was a democrat and at one time was 
a greenbacker. He was affiliated with the Masons. 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of 
Pythias and was a member of the Christian Church. 
His widow is still living at Angola. 

They had a family of nine children, named DeWitt, 
Eugene, James, John, Lucy, George, Maud, Mildred 
and Elizabeth. "Three are now deceased, John, Lucy 
and Elizabeth. 

DeWitt Ewers was educated in the schools of 
Angola, where he has spent most of his life. He 
attended the Angola High School, and finished the 
commercial course of the Tri-State Normal. For 
thirty-three years he has been connected with the 
brick and tile company and was an active associate 
with his father and uncle for seventeen years and 
since the incorporation of the company has been 
its manager. 

Mr. Ewers is a prohibitionist in politics. He was 
a member of the first council of the City of Angola. 
He is a member of the Masonic Lodge and Knights 
of Pythias and of the Christian Church. In 1893 
he married Miss Ida May Eckman, who was born 
in Whitley County, Indiana, daughter of George 
and Marion (Taylor) Eckman. She was only seven 
years old when her mother died, and her father 
afterward came to Steuben County and died at 
Metz, where Mrs. Ewers lived until her marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ewers have two children. Leland, 
born August 31, 1894, was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of Angola and is now associated 
with his father and is also engaged in the coal 
business. Marion, born March 18, 1901, is a student 



22 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



of the Angola High School. Mr. Ewers' nephew, 
Ralph Ewers, a son of his brother Eugene, is now 
serving in the One Hundred and Forty-Sixth Artil- 
lery with the Army of Occupation in Germany. 

AfAURiCE C. Lemmon has been figuring as one of 
the leading men in the agricultural industry of 
Steuben County for over thirty years. He has a 
large farm in Steuben Township, his address being 
at Pleasant Lake. He is a native of that county, 
and his people have lived there for over three- 
quarters of a century. 

Mr. Lemmon was born in Otsego Township No- 
vember 9, 1862, a son of David Riley and Lorana 
( Tuttle) Lemmon. The grandparents, Maurice and 
Lucinda Lemmon, came to Steuben County in 1842 
and acquired the farm which their son David Riley 
afterwards owned. Grandfather Maurice Lemmon 
died at the age of thirty-two and his wife at forty- 
eight. They had four children, Bert, David Riley, 
Brace and Clay. The mother of these children 
afterward married David Lemmon, a brother of 
her first husband, and by that union also had four 
children, Tina, Adhill, Mildred and Burr. 

David Riley Lemmon was born in Sandusky 
County, Ohio, November 26, 1839, and was about 
three or four years old when his parents came to 
Steuben County. He grew up on the homestead, 
made a choice farm of it, and of the 160 acr^s he 
sold sixty-two and a half acres to his son Morton. 
He also owned forty acres in another place and 
still another tract of fifty-five acres. In politics 
he is a republican. His wife, Lorana Tuttle, was 
born in Sandusky County, Ohio, April 15, 1838, and 
they were married February 20, 1861. Her parents 
were Lemmon and Lora Tuttle. Mrs. David R. 
Lemmon died May 12, 1899, and a few years later 
her husband moved to Pleasant Lake, where he is 
now living retired. They had a family of nine 
children, all still living, named Maurice, Cora, 
Morton, Lora, Chaplin, Vira, Bessie, Ethel and 
Elsie. 

Maurice C. Lemmon spent his early years on his 
father's farm and attended the district schools and 
the Pleasant Lake High School. He has given all 
his time and energies to farming since he was 
twenty-two years of age, and after renting for three 
years he bought in 1889 the place where he now 
lives, comprising 152 acres. Much of the land was 
rough and uncleared, and he has since put it into 
cultivation and has improved the farm with good 
buildings. Mr. Lemmon is a republican, but has 
never sought political office. 

In 1884 he married Miss Anna Beecher, daughter 
of Truman and Statira (Brown) Beecher. Her 
mother died in 1901 and her father is now livmg 
at Hamilton. Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon have three 
children: Russell finished his education in the 
Pleasant Lake High School and died in 1906, at the 
age of twenty years. Bernice, who was educated 
in the Pleasant Lake High School, married Clarence 
Brooks, of Pleasant Lake, and they have two chd- 
dren, Alice Jean and Maurice George. The son 
Beecher also had a high school education, and on 
July 27, 1917, enlisted in the regular army, and 
served until granted an honorable discharge April 
25, 1918. At the time of his discharge he was a 
sergeant in the quartermaster's corps. 

Truman A. Beecher, one of the oldest residents 
and business men of Hamilton, Indiana, where he 
has lived more than sixty years, was born in Craw- 
ford County, Ohio, May 25, 1837, a son of Truman 
and Hannah (Sloane) Beecher. His father was 



born at Litchfield, Connecticut, and his mother near 
Stcubenville, Ohio, and they were married in the 
latter state in 1824. Truman Beecher and a partner 
built the first ten locks on the Ohio Canal at Akron, 
Ohio. Later he moved to Fredericksburg in Wayne 
County and also lived at Wooster, the county seat 
of that county. His business as a contractor took 
him to various localities. He also lived in Crawford 
County, and in 1845 brought his family to Franklin 
Township of DeKalb County, Indiana. He soon 
moved to Albion in Noble County, where his wife 
died' in 1850. About that time he fitted up a com- 
pany for the overland route to California, and 
while on the way west he took sick and died at Fort 
Laramie, Wyoming, when about sixty years of age. 
His children were John Sloane, Mary, Philemon, 
Henry and Truman A. 

Mr. Beecher's maternal grandfather, John Sloane, 
was a distinguished figure in Ohio and national his- 
tory. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1779 and 
at an early date moved to Ohio. During the War 
of 1812 he was a colonel of militia. He was a 
member of the Legislature in 1804-06, serving two 
years as speaker. He was United States receiver 
of public monies at Canton from iSoS to 1816, and 
at Wooster from 1816 to 1819. He represented his 
district in Congress from 1819 until 1829. He was 
a warm friend and admirer of Henry Clay, and at 
a time when the presidential election was decided by 
the House of Representatives in the contest between 
Adams, Clay and Crawford, he refused a high 
presidential appointment offered as a reward for 
his voting for Adams, and remained true to Clay. 
A warm friendship existed between him and the 
great Kentucky whig statesman. John Sloane was 
also clerk of the Court of Common Pleas seven 
years, secretary of the State of Ohio three years 
and was appointed United States treasurer and 
served from November, 1850, to April, 1853. He 
died at Wooster, Ohio, in May, 1856. 

Truman A. Beecher was eight years old when his 
parents came to DeKalb County, Indiana. He at- 
tended public schools and after the death of his 
father and mother he returned to Wooster, Ohio, 
and lived with his distinguished grandfather, John 
Sloane. As a youth he learned the trade of tinner, 
and in 1858. on coming to Steuben County and 
locating at Hamilton, he opened a tinner's shop. 
He was in business steadily for over fifty years, 
until he retired in 1915. Mr. Beecher owns a good 
home in Hamilton. He has been a steadfast re- 
publican, his father having been an old-line whig. 
In religious views he is liberal. On May 4, 1862, 
he married Miss Statira Brown. She was born in 
Erie County, Ohio, in 1840, and died in 1901. Mr. 
and Mrs. Beecher had ten children, including several 
pairs of twins: Minnie; Anna, wife of Maurice 
Lemmon; Harriet Stowe ; Nettie and an infant 
sister ; William, whose twin died in infancy ; Frank 
C. and Fannie C, twins; and James Garfield, who 
was born the day Garfield was elected president. 

John M. Moore is one of the widely known citi- 
zens of Noble County, spent many years of his life 
as a practical farmer, but for the last twenty years 
has been in the sawmill and lumber business at 
Cromwell, and is now head of the M. Moore & Com- 
pany, dealers in lumber and building material and 
coal. 

Mr. Moore was born three miles southwest of 
Cromwell in Sparta Township, November 25, 1856, 
son of Joseph and Mary (Airgood) Moore. His 
father, a native of New Jersey, came West to Noble 
County, Indiana, at the age of sixteen, grew up and 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



23 



here, and then settled in section 19 of 
Sparta Township. Later he acquired a farm of 162 
acres in Turkey Creek Township of Kosciusko 
County, and lived there until the death of his wife. 
He afterward married a second time, and spent his 
last years at Cromwell. By his first wife he was the 
father of nine children, two of whom died young. 
Those still living include : Enieline, widow of John 
S. Shock; Maria, wife of Allen Wright, of Syra- 
cuse, Indiana; Almina, wife of Charles Lowner, of 
Syracuse ; Etta, wife of Rev. N. J. Myer, of Denver, 
Colorado ; and Minnie, wife of William Grider, of 
Sparta Township. 

John M. Moore attended the schools near his 
father's home and had the usual training and ex- 
perience of an Indiana farm boy. He sought no 
particular interest or enterprise outside of farming 
until 1898, when he left the country and moved to 
Cromwell. Here he established and conducted a 
lumber yard and sawmill, and continued it as an 
individual business under his own name until Janu- 
ary, iQi-t, when he associated his son-in-law with 
him. They carry a large stock and have taken pains 
to be in a position to supply every demand for build- 
ing material and similar commodities required by 
their community. 

Mr. Moore married Nettie Snyder. He had the 
misfortune to lose his wife in August, 1914. She 
was the mother of five children : Elvin C, a busi- 
ness man of Hartford City, Indiana; Ethel, wife of 
Calvin Seymour ; Freeman C, who lives on the old 
farm ; Hazel and Mabel, twins, the former the wife 
of Roy Eaton, and the latter the wife of Forest 
Heney, of .A.villa, Indiana. On January 30, 1919, 
Mr. Moore married Minnie Bentz, of Turkey Creek 
Township, Kosciusko County. He is affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias and 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a past 
grand and past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. 
Politically he is a republican. Besides his chief 
business Mr. Moore is a stockholder in the Sparta 
State Bank. 

Arthur L. Peacuey. While Mr. Peachey's enter- 
prise has been directed over a good farm in Fre- 
mont Township for a number of years, the original 
seat of the family in Steuben County was Otsego 
Township, where he was born and where his par- 
ents settled at a time not far removed from the 
earliest occupation. 

Mr. Peachey was born October 19, 1861, a son of 
James and Sarah (Brown) Peachey. His parents 
were both natives of Cambridgeshire, England. Sa- 
rah Brown was a daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Brown) Brown. Joseph Brown, accompanied by 
his family, including Mr. and Mrs. James Peachey, 
came from England to America in 1851. He located 
in Medina County, Ohio, and from there to 1857 
moved to Otsego Township of Steuben County, 
where he spent the rest of his life. He had two 
daughters, named Rebecca and Sarah. _ James 
Peachey also located in Otsego Township in 1857, 
and was one of the capable farmers of that locality 
until his death on January 23, 1890. His widow 
survived him until March, 1910. They have four 
children, named Walter, Mary, Margaret and Ar- 
thur L. 

Arthur L. Peachey acquired his early education 
in the district schools, attended the high school at 
Angola, and for nearly thirty years has found his 
efforts directed pleasantly and profitably along lines 
of agriculture. In the spring of 1892 he moved from 
Otsego to Scott Township, farmed there ten years, 
in 1902 returned to Otsego and in 1910 bought his 
present place in section 34 of Fremont Township. 



Mr. Peachey is owner of 167 acres, well improved, 
two of the buildings having been erected under its 
present ownership, and all devoted to general farm- 
ing and stock raising. Mr. Peachey is a breeder of 
blooded Shorthorn cattle. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge at Fremont. 

In 1887 he married Inez McCurdy, daughter of 
Robert and Celinda (Mumma) McCurdy. They have 
two children, J. Carl and Achsa. Carl, who runs 
the home farm with his father, married Lena Stroh. 
Achsa is the wife of K. B. Mann. 

J. Frank Stanley is a native of Green Township, 
Noble County, and during his long career there has 
concerned himself not only with the successful 
prosecution of his private business and affairs but 
also with many community enterprises. He is a 
former trustee of the township, and has always been 
active in politics. Mr. Stanley's home farm is the 
northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 21. 

He was born in the same township April 7, 1849, 
and the Stanleys are one of the oldest families of 
that locality. His parents were H. C. and Sophronia 
(Beeson) Stanley. His father was born in Preble 
County, Ohio, January 24, 1818. His mother was 
born in Wayne County, Indiana, December 22, 1824. 
When H. C. Stanley was three years old his parents 
moved to Union (Zounty, Indiana, where he grew 
up. He and his wife were married in Wayne 
County, Indiana. The Beeson family came from 
North Carolina. H. C. Stanley after his marriage 
moved into the wilderness of Green Towship, Noble 
County, establishing a farm in the northern part of 
the township. He lived there the rest of his life and 
was one of the really big men in the community. His 
material affairs prospered, including the ownership 
of 400 acres of good farm lands. He also served as 
county commissioner and three times represented his 
county in the Legislature. During the Civil war 
lie lent all his influence and resources to the success- 
ful prosecution of the war against the rebellion. 
H, C. Stanley and wife had seven children to reach 
maturity and si.x are still living: J. Frank; May 
H., wife of Oro Barnum ; M. D. Stanley, of Avilla; 
Alice, widow of Marshall Bonham ; C. H. Stanley, 
of Albion; and Charles H., a farmer in Noble 
County. 

J. F"rank Stanley grew up on the home farm 
in the northern part of Green Township, and was 
well educated in the common schools and the schools 
of Albion. For several years he taught in his native 
county in addition to farming. He made his home 
with his parents until he was past the age of thirty. 

In 1882 he established a home of his own by his 
marriage to Alma Prouty. She was born in Jeffer- 
son Township of Noble County and was educated 
in the common schools. She also taught. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stanley located on 
their present farm, known as the Fountain Farm, 
comprising 200 well cultivated acres. Here Mrs. 
Stanley died in 1886. None of her children are 
now living. In 1896 Mr. Stanley married Miss 
Clara Applegate. She was born in Noble County. 
They have two living children : Aubrey, a graduate 
of high school and now in Purdue University, joined 
the students aviation corps at Purdue. Hazel is a 
high school student. The family are members of 
the United Brethren Church at Green Center. Mr. 
Stanley is a stanch democrat. He served three 
times by election and twice by appointment as trustee 
of Green Township. He is a stockholder in the 
Farmers State Bank at Albion. 

Merle C. Nisonger. One of the younger men of 
the agricultural community of Scott Township, 



24 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Steuben County, Merle C. Nisonger has the 
progressive spirit of youth and has identified him- 
self with the best interests of the community and 
with those organizations which represent the modern 
uplift in country life and agricultural enterprise. 

He was born on the old Nisonger homestead in 
Scott Township June 7, 1885, a son of Jackson and 
Sarah Jane (Dygert) Nisonger. Jackson Nisonger 
was a native of Kosciusko County, Indiana, and his 
parents settled in early days in Scott Township, 
trading their Kosciusko County lands for 107 acres 
in Steuben County. Jackson Nisonger grew up on 
the farm, spent his life as an agriculturalist, and 
since his death his widow has become the wife of 
James E. Gifford, mentioned on other pages of this 
publication. 

Merle C. Nisonger grew up on his father's farm, 
attended the district schools, and for two years 
was a student in the Angola High School. After 
leaving school he spent a year and a half traveling 
in Colorado, Oregon and California and other 
points in the West. With a new outlook and knowl- 
edge he returned to Steuben County and has since 
been busily engaged in farming. He bought eighty 
acres of the Cyrus Cole estate as the principal part 
of his farm, and has since added another twenty 
acres, giving him 100 acres for cultivation and man- 
agement. He keeps a number of grade Holstein 
cattle and follows modern feeding methods, employ- 
ing a silo, his silo being 10x40 feet. Since January 
I, igi8, Mr. Nisonger has been secretary of the 
Angola Cooperative Shippers Association. He is a 
democrat, is affiliated with Angola Lodge No. 236, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and also the 
Odd Fellows Lodge at Angola. 

February 16, 1910, he married Miss Dessa Mor- 
rison, of Angola, daughter of Irvin and Myrtle 
Morrison. To their marriage were born three chil- 
dren: Jackson M., Lyle T. and Lorin M. 

Abram H. Wemple is one of the oldest and best 
known citizens of Noble County, and continuously 
for over half a century has lived on and worked out 
his prosperity on one farm. This farm home, which 
has so many associations for him and his family, is 
located in section 23 of Perry Township, a half 
mile north and three-quarters of a mile east of 
Ligonier. 

He was born in Schenectady County, New York, 
October 8, 1841, son of John A. and Elizabeth 
(Strang) Wemple, both natives of New York State. 
His mother was born in New York City. After 
their marriage they came to Indiana in 1855, locating 
in Clear Spring Township of LaGrange County. 
They were farmers in that community, and were 
active members of the Reformed Church, of which 
John A. Wemple was a deacon and otherwise active. 
He was a democrat in political affiliations. Of ten 
children five are living: Abram H. ; Angelica, 
widow of Bartlet Smith; James V., a farmer in 
Michigan; Elias C, who lives on a farm at Valen- 
tine in LaGrange County; and Elijah P., of Topeka, 
Indiana. 

Abram H. Wemple was fourteen years old when 
his parents first came to LaGrange County. The 
following year his father returned to New York 
State, and it was not until the fall of 1859 that the 
family settled permanently in LaGrange County. 
Abraham therefore acquired his education partly 
in the public schools in LaGrange County. He lived 
at home until the age of twenty-four. 

On December 28, 1865, he married Lavina Nelson. 
• She was born in New York State, October 13, 1845, 
and was brought to Indiana at the age of two years, 



her people being neighbors to the Wemples in La- 
Grange County. Mr. and Mrs. Wemple lived for 
one year with her parents, but in 1867 came to the 
farm where they have had their home for over half 
a century. ' Mr. Wemple has not only kept up his 
own land and improvements but has witnessed a 
remarkable transformation in many ways that en- 
hance the value and attractiveness of country life. 
He has a good farm of 120 acres, is a stockholder in 
the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company and the 
Co-operative Elevator in Ligonier, and is still man- 
aging his various business interests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wemple had four children : Charles 
N., who was educated in the common and high 
schools, is married and lives in Perry Township ; 
Clarence E. finished his education in high school 
and lives in Ligonier ; Cora L. was a student in the 
Ligonier High School and is the wife of Delano 
Oliver and has one daughter, Mildred, who is a 
graduate of high school ; and Arvilla, who finished 
her education in the Ligonier High School and is the 
wife of Charles Straub, of Goshen. Mr. Wemple 
has three grandchildren. He and his family are 
members of the United Brethren Church at Ligonier, 
and he is one of its trustees. In politics he is a 
democrat. 

William F. Kruf.ger. A family that has for many 
years enjoyed the respect and esteem of a large 
community in Northeastern Indiana is that repre- 
sented by William F. Krueger, who is one of the 
leading farmers in Salem Township of Steuben 
County, and is a son of the late Charles Henry 
Krueger. 

Charles Henry Krueger was born in Germany 
April 5, 1835, and married there in 1859 Sophia 
Miller. She was born July 21, 1843. Immediately 
after their marriage they started for America, and 
after landing came west to Kendallville, Indiana. 
Charles H. Krueger had been coachman for a 
wealthy family in Germany, but after coming to 
America clerked in a drug store and later in a gro- 
cery store, and also operated a dray. He was al- 
ways very fond of horses. In 1878 he moved to 
Steuben County and bought eighty acres of land, 
and by his industry cleared most of it and erected 
very substantial buildings, including a barn 66 by 30 
feet. He lived there until his death on January 7, 
1906. His widow is still living at the old homestead 
with her son William. Charles H. Krueger was a 
democrat in politics and a member of the Lutheran 
Church. He and his wife had the following chil- 
dren: Minnie, wife of Alfred Fisher; Henry, who 
died when twenty-one years old ; Georgina, who is 
the wife of John Ahrens and has three children, 
named lona, Milton and Jessie; William; Gusta, 
wife of Theodore Richards, and they have one child, 
Theodore. Mrs. Charles Krueger also has an 
adopted daughter, Augusta, a grandchild, daughter 
of her son Harmon. Harmon Krueger first mar- 
ried Pauline Keibel and Augusta is the only child 
of their union. For his second wife he married 
Bertha Fogus, and has two children, George and 
Helen. 

William F. Krueger was born at Kendallville 
July 26, 1872, and since early childhood has lived 
on the home farm. He received his education in 
the public schools and is a high class farmer, one 
who takes pride in keeping improvements up to date. 
He is a raiser of Poland China and Berkshire hogs 
and Shropshire sheep. He built both the house and 
the barn and has made many other improvements. 
When the family came to this farm there was only 
a log house and a log barn, and much interesting 
transformation has gone on since Mr. Krueger 





ca 



ZD- 



<" 



mA 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



25 



moved here. Mr. William F. Krueger is unmarried 
and makes his home with his mother. He is a 
democrat in politics and a member of the Lutheran 
Church. 

Amos Bowsher, an honored veteran of the Civil 
war, vi-hose two sons have done patriotic service for 
their country in the recent World war, is a native 
of Northeast Indiana, and for half a century has 
been actively identified with the Topeka community 
in LaGrange County. He was born in Perry Town- 
ship of Noble County September 9, 1842, son of 
Boston and Sophia (Kuntz) Bowsher. His father 
was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, and his mother 
in Virginia. The Bowsher and Kuntz families were 
among the earliest settlers of Northern Indiana, 
the Bowshers locating near Ligonier in Noble County 
while the Kuntzes established their early home in 
Elkhart County. Boston Bowsher and wife after 
their marriage settled in Perry Township of Noble 
County, and spent the rest of their days on the 
farm. He was a democrat in politics. They were 
the parents of fourteen children, four of whom 
are still living : Amos ; Cephas, a resident of Colo- 
rado ; Mary, wife of Samuel Giant, of Topeka, In- 
diana; and Catherine, wife of Christ Slabaugh, of 
Perry Township, Noble County. 

Amos Bowsher grew up on his father's farm in 
Noble County and had such advantages as were 
oflfered by the district schools of that day. He 
was about nineteen when the Civil war broke out, 
and on January 8, 1862, he enlisted in Company I 
of the Forty-eighth Indiana Infantry. He was in 
service over three years, and received a slight wound 
during the Vicksburg campaign. He held the rank 
of sergeant. After returning home he rented his 
father's farm for a time, and on February 18, 1867, 
married Miss Clara Poyser. She was born in Eden 
Township of LaGrange County August 11, 1850. 
Mrs. Bowsher owns in Eden Township 420 acres, 
the farm where she was born, also the home of her 
father and maternal grandfather, Senator John 
Thompson. 

Mr. Bowsher still owns 120 acres of good farm 
land, but is practically retired from managing it. 
He owns local real estate in Topeka. He is a re- 
publican in politics and is past grand of Topeka 
Lodge No. 760, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is also a member of the Masonic Order. 

His two sons are William H. and Harley M. Wil- 
liam H. graduated from the State Normal at Terre 
Haute. He is a mechanical engineer by profession, 
and during the World war was in the Engineers 
Corps with the rank of first lieutenant. He served 
in France six months and was wounded in action 
three times and gassed. He was at the Argonne For- 
est battle and in other engagements. He makes his 
home at Topeka. The other son is a graduate of 
high school, and is a jeweler by trade. During 
his army service he was assigned to duties with 
the Eleventh Cavalry Band at Washington, District 
of Columbia. 

Isaac Sutton, a former sheriff of LaGrange 
County, is known all over Indiana as a horse man. 
On his farm and in his stables he has raised and 
trained some of the best road horses in the country 
and is an expert in every detail of staple manage- 
ment. 

Mr. Sutton was born in Eden Township February 
28, 1853, a son of David and Julia (Miller) Sutton, 
the former a native of Indiana and the latter of 
Ohio. His grandfather James Sutton was a native 
of England and came to the United States with six 
brothers, several of whom subsequently located 
in Indiana. David Sutton grew up in Allen County, 



and after his marriage settled in Eden Township, 
where death overtook him in his labors at the age 
of thirty-nine. He and his wife had eight children, 
one of whom died in infancy, and the three still 
living are Marion, Isaac and David, all living near 
Topeka. 

Isaac Sutton grew up on a farm which his grand- 
mother Catherine Miller had entered from the 
government. He attended the common schools and 
spent one year in Valparaiso University. As a 
boy on his father's farm he took special interest 
in handling the horses, and he is still in the business 
of breeding and training road horses. He formerly 
owned "Jack Dillard," with a record of 2:ii!4; 
Among his horses were "Barney M. Hart," with a 
record of 2:17^, "Bonnie B.," a dam of "'Jack 
Dillard" and "Barney M." made a mark of 2:i6'4, 

onH "PTrl T-r Ho.-*" o-ir.!/ o„„ „f "tf- -Kt 



Hart." 



Ed. H. Hart" 2:1014, son of "Barney M. 



Mr. Sutton served as sheriff of LaGrange County 
from December 3, 1900, to January i, 1905. He 
lived in the county seat during his term of office, but 
since then has been on his farm of 170 acres. 

In September, 1879, he married Julia Roderick, a 
native of Eden Township, and they grew up together 
aschildren. Mr. and Mrs. Sutton have two children; 
Minnie, who attended high school and is the wife 
of Karl Ulmer of North Manchester, Indiana; and 
Guy, who married Beulah Barnes and lives in 
Topeka. 

Mr. Sutton is a Past Grand of Haw Patch Lodge 
No. 760 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
has been a member of the Grand Lodge, and he and 
his wife were formerly members of the Rebekahs. 
Politically he is a republican and was elected on 
that ticket to the office of sheriflf. 

Ray D. Hosack is well known to the business 
community of Angola, where he is the leading 
musical instrument merchant. He has had a long 
and active experience in this line of business, and 
the family tastes largely run along the line of 
music. 

He was born in Defiance County, Ohio, November 
12, 1892. His grandfather was a native of New 
York State and when quite young moved to Ohio, 
owning a farm there, and was also a partner in the 
Matchlin Machine Works. He died in Ohio. Ray 
Hosack's father is a native Ohioan, was reared and 
educated there, studying music, and nearly all his 
active life has been a teacher of music. He travels 
rnuch in quartet work, has done much singing to 
aid evangelists, and is now proprietor of a musical 
instrument store at Edgerton, Ohio. He also has 
a lOO-acre farm near that town. He is a republican 
and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Ray D. Hosack secured his education in the 
grammar and high schools of Ohio, had a normal 
training, and for one year attended Dana's Musical 
Institute. He was for several years employed as 
salesman of musical instruments and for one year 
worked in a piano factory in New York City. Mr. 
Hosack came to Angola in 1916 and engaged in the 
music business, and the following year bought the 
Conklin Music Store, which is one of the chief 
centers for the trade in musical instrument supplies 
in Steuben County. 

April 20, 1918, Mr. Hosack married Miss Blanche 
Baker, a daughter of Frank W. Baker, a prominent 
farmer and member of an old family of Steuben 
County. Mrs. Hosack was born in 1895. 

Anderson Galloway, a retired farmer living at 
Cromwell, has had a long and notable experience 
during his lifetime of nearly eighty years. He is 



26 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



one of the oldest native sons of Noble County, hav- 
ing been born in Washington Township, March 14, 
1840. 

His parents were Joseph and Frances (Town) 
Galloway, the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
the latter of Vermont. This was his father's second 
marriage. His father first married in Ohio, and 
coming to Indiana located on Rolling Prairie and 
entered Noble County as a pioneer in 1837, settling 
in Washington Township, where he spent the rest 
of his life. He was always prominent in politics, 
first as a whig and later as a republican. He and his 
wife Frances had seven children, five of whom are 
still living: Anderson; Catherine, widow of James 
Reed ; Martha, widow of Abiaham Hines ; Scott, of 
Wolf Lake ; and Frances, widow of Frank Eaton. 

Anderson Galloway spent his boyhood days in the 
pioneer environment of Washington Township, and 
had opportunities to attend school only during the 
winter sessions. At the age of eighteen he started 
out to make his own way in the world. For a time 
he lived in Illinois, working at wages of $1 1 a month, 
then went to Missouri and got an advance of wages 
to $15 a month, and for one summer was employed 
on a Mississippi River steamboat. He adventured 
further West to the gold mines of Denver, and re- 
mained in those diggings for a year and a half, and 
was more fortunate than most prospectors, since he 
returned with more than he took with him. 

Returning to Noble County in 1861, Mr. Galloway, 
after the death of his father in 1863, enlisted in 
Company C of the Thirtieth Indiana Infantry. He 
saw much of the hard fighting of the war during 
the time he was in the army. He participated in the 
Atlanta campaign under Sherman, and after the fall 
of that Confederate stronghold he went back to 
Tennessee under General Thomas in pursuit of 
General Hood to Nashville. He received his final 
discharge in Texas. 

After his return home on February 8, 1866, he 
married Harriet Miller. She was born in Sparta 
Township of Noble County and has lived in that 
locality all her life. After their marriage they 
moved to a farm in the southern part of the town- 
ship and lived there until 1901, when they retired to 
Cromwell. Mr. Galloway still owns 274 acres of 
land in Noble County. He became affiliated with 
the Masonic Lodge at Ligonier in 1863, and upon the 
organization of Cromwell Lodge No. 705, became a 
charter member. He has always been active as a 
republican, and he was one of the Township Advis- 
ory Board for Sparta from the time the law was 
passed establishing that board for sixteen consecu- 
tive years. Mrs. Galloway is a member of the 
Lutheran Church. 

They have six living children : Gross, a farmer 
in Sparta Township ; Clara, wife of Theodore 
Wright, of Sparta; Etta, wife of William R. 
Wright, of Cromwell ; Orda, a dentist at Angola ; 
Ora, wife of William Hinman, of Cromwell ; and 
Oakley, of Detroit. 

Eugene F. Weight has accumulated a great deal 
of experience since boyhood, and largely dependent 
upon his own resources and abilities has achieved a 
prosperity as a farmer which classes him with the 
very first and best of that profession in Salem 
Township of Steuben County. 

He was born in that township April 15, 1857, a 
son of Fred and Susan (McEntarfer) Weicht. His 
father was born in Germany in 1818 and his mother 
in Pennsylvania in 1839. Fred Weicht came to 
America with his parents at the age of twelve years. 
They were a pioneer family in Salem Township of 
Steuben County. Fred was the oldest of seven chil- 



dren, the others being William, Leopold, Charles, 
Ernest (who died in infancy), Christiana and 
Louisa. Grandfather Weicht acquired 120 acres of 
government land in Steuben county, and the same 
tract, greatly improved, was afterward owned by 
Fred Weicht. Fred Weicht died in 1865, and his 
widow survived him until 1910. Fred Weicht was a 
physician by profession and gave much of his time 
to practice in the early days. He and his wife had 
five children : Julius, Elizabeth, Adaline, Eugene 
and Ida. 

As a boy on the home farm in Salem Township 
Eugene F. Weicht acquired his education in the 
public schools and also attended the Angola High 
School. He was only eight years old when his fa- 
ther died, and as there was no one to help hira par- 
ticularly he early learned to help himself. For about 
two years he followed the trade of carpenter. As 
a farmer he rented land, and later bought forty 
acres where he still lives. Subsequently he added 
seventy-nine acres and afterward ninety acres, and 
is now owner of a fine body of land comprising 209 
acres. He uses this for raising the staple crops of 
the vicinity and also keeps a herd of pure bred 
Poland China hogs. He is an extensive cattle 
feeder. 

Mr. Weicht is a democrat in politics. In 1886 he 
married Miss Effie Silvey, daughter of Benjamin 
and Magdalena (Sutterlin) Silvey. Her parents 
were among the early settlers of Salem Township 
and her mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Weicht 
have two children. Vern, born October 30, 1889, 
was educated in the district schools and the Angola 
High School, also attended Tri-State Normal Col- 
lege, and on November 26, 191 5, married Miss Mil- 
dred Leas, a daughter of Marvin Leas of Salem 
Township. They have a daughter, June Catherine. 
Carmah, the second child of Mr. and Mrs. Weicht, 
was born January 9, 1891, is a graduate of the 
Pleasant Lake High School and the wife of Asa 
Glago. Mr. and Mrs. Glago have two children, 
Madalena and Carroll. 

John Headley. From the years of early man- 
hood until his death in 1914. John Headley was a 
citizen of York Township in Steuben County upon 
whom his neighbors could depend, when the com- 
munity needed the support of all its public spirited 
citizens. He lived a long life, was prospered in 
his material affairs, and left a name untarnished 
to his descendants. 

He was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Septem- 
ber 9, 1828, a son of Reuben and Louisa Headley, 
the former a native of New Jersey and and the latter 
of Virginia. The family came to Steuben County 
in 1849, settling in section 16 of York Township, 
where Reuben Headley died in i860, at the age 
of sixty-six. His widow survived and passed away 
February 12, 1892. Their children to reach mature 
years were John, Hannah, Nancy, Mary, Wheeling, 
Joseph, Reuben, Sarah Jane, Emma, Louisa and 
Charles. 

John Headley was just about twenty-one years 
old when he came to Steuben County. In the same 
year he bought thirty-six acres of land in section 16 
and deeded it to his mother. In 1851 he bought forty 
acres for himself in the same section, and there 
started to clear the land and make a home, and in 
the later years of his life he had the satisfaction 
of seeing his efforts rewarded in a farm that was 
a conspicuously attractive part of the landscape. He 
at one time owned 280 acres in his home farm, and 
at the time of his death had 200 acres. He was 
very successful in handling stock and usually kept 
his farm supplied with some of the best cattle and 
horses in the county. He was a loyal republican in 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST IND7ANA 



27 



politics, and for twenty-one years was road super- 
visor. 

November 9, 1853, he married Susan Hubbell. She 
was born in New York State July 13, 1833, and died 
April II, 1882. She was the molhcr of five chil- 
dren: Edwin E., Edgar, Minard, Cary, who died 
at the age of six years, and Mordant, who died in 
infancy. 

June 24, 1883, Mr. Headley married Harriett 
Hood. She was born in DeKalb County Marth 23, 
i860. She is still living on the home farm in York 
Township. She was the mother of four children: 
Alma, born April 20, 1886, and died September IS, 
1886; Harmon, born March 6, 1892, had a public 
school education and is a farmer living at home 
with his mother; Nora B., born August 2, 1894, now 
the wife of Lawrence Dick, of York Township, and 
she has two children, named Winona and Alcne ; and 
John, born July 9, 1900, finished the common schools 
and lives on the hotne farm. 

EvERiNGTON F. Beers. A farm widely known as 
one of the notable old homesteads of Steuben 
County is tlie Walnut Dale Farm in Jackson Town- 
ship, the present proprietors of which are Mr. and 
Mrs. Everington F. Beers. They and their families 
have been factors in the early settlement and the 
later development of Steuben County for three 
quarters of a century. 

Mr. Beers was born in Jamestown Township 
August 30, 1847, son of Bradford and Amanda 
(Bement) Beers, both natives of New York. His 
parents were married in that state and came to 
Steuben County in 1845. His father bought eighty 
acres in Jamestown Township, and on selling that 
acquired forty acres in Jackson Township. The 
last fifteen years of his life he lived with his son 
Everington and died in 1893, at the age of seventy- 
three. The mother of Mr. Beers died in 1857, aged 
thirty-one. Bradford Beers was a democrat, and 
as a pioneer lived in a log house when he first came 
to Steuben County. He and his wife had five chil- 
dren: Eleanor; Harriet, deceased; Everington P.; 
Imogene, deceased ; and Mortimer. The father mar- 
ried for his second wife 'Burnett Whaley, and their 
three children were Ida, George and Nora, both 
daughters now deceased. 

Everington F. Beers grew up on his father's farm 
and had a public school education. Until he re- 
tired he was an active farmer for nearly fifty years, 
and the first place he owned was eighty acres on 
Jackson Prairie in the Township of that name. He 
lived there seventeen years and in 1904 moved to 
his present home, the old Darius Sams place, for- 
merly owned by Mrs. Beers' father. He lived there 
as a renter for twelve years before he bought. 
Mr. and Mrs. Beers have 126 acres in their home 
place and have added many improvements to it 
during their ownership. Mr. Beers now rents his 
farm and is practically retired. 

He is one of the men who has lived to see early 
hopes realized in the success of the prohibition 
cause. When he cast his first vote on the prohibi- 
tion ticket in Jackson Township he was the only 
man to support that ticket and he gave his modest 
advocacy to the cause alone in that locality for sev- 
eral years. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

February 23, 1874, Mr. Beers married Miss Effie 
Sams. She was born on the place where she now 
lives Februarv 25, 1854. a daughter of Darius and 
Phoebe (Lounsbury) Sams. Her father was bom 
in Ohio in 1820 and her mother in New York State 
in 1831. Darius Sams was a son of David and 
Elizabeth (Baker) Sams and they were among the 
earliest settlers of Steuben County, coming in 1833 



and locating on a farm south of the Jackson Prairie 
cemetery. At that time David Sams acquired forty 
acres and afterward by entry and purchase became 
one of the extensive land owners in the county. He 
died on the old homestead in April, 1874, at the 
age of seventy-three, while his wife passed away in 
1888, aged eighty-eight. They had the following 
children: Mary Jane, Peter, Daniel, Darius, Sarah 
.^nn, Abdilla, Amasa and Henry, the only one now 
living being Henry. 

Darius Sams, father of Mrs. Beers, had a good 
education, attending the Academy at Ontario and 
the Methodist College at Fort Wayne. After school 
days he spent his active career as a farmer and 
bought the 126 acres where Mr. and Mrs. Beers now 
live, and that was his home for fifty-three years. 
He also owned a place of 120 acres a mile and a 
half south and later bought forty acres of his fa- 
ther's old home. Darius Sams died in 1915, at the 
age of eighty-si.x, having spent practically eighty 
years in Steuben County. His wife died April 21, 
1907, aged seventy-eight. 

Mrs. Beers was the only child of her parents, 
though her mother by a previous marriage, to Daniel 
Sams, brother of her second husband, had a son, 
Daniel. Mrs. Beers was educated in the public 
schools, the Orland Academy and the .Angola High 
School. Mr. and Mrs. Beers have two sons. Hugh, 
born April 8, 1880, was educated in the Orland High 
School and as a farmer rents his father's place on 
Jackson Prairie, comprising 120 acres, including 
forty acres where the grandparents of Mrs. Beers 
began keeping house in the pioneer times. Hugh 
Beers married Anna Nichols, and their three sons 
are Bruce, Henry and Homer. Mrs. Hugh Beers 
died in January, 1917, and he married for his second 
wife Flora White. Harry Beers, the second son, 
was born January 29, 1888. He also completed a 
high school course at Orland, and is owner of I20 
acres of the old John Parker farm. He married 
Versa Walters, and has one daughter, Helen. 

James M. Furnish. One of the farms in Jack- 
son Township of DeKalb County longest in the 
possession of one family is that owned by James M. 
Furnish on the bounty line between Allen and De- 
Kalb counties. Mr. Furnish himself has gathered 
crops from that land for over forty years, and 
his father before him developed and farmed it. 

James M. Furnish was born in Ashland County, 
Ohio, January 26, 1849, a son of David and Mary C. 
(Davis) Furnish. His father was born in Suffolk, 
England, in 1805, and came to the United States 
when about twenty-eight or thirty years of age. He 
lived in Boston for several years, married in that 
city, and then moved to .-Xshland County, Ohio. His 
home w'as in Ashland County for seventeen years. 
He supported his family by common labor and also 
by farming. After selling his twenty-five acres of 
land in Ashland County he moved to DeKalb County 
and bought eighty acres where his son James now 
lives. He remained there the rest of his life and 
owing to an injury spent several years almost help- 
less. James M. Furnish carefully looked after his 
parents in their declining years and was their main- 
stay and sujjport during their last years. Both were 
active in the Lutheran Church and his father was a 
republican. Of their family of eleven children only 
four are now living : .\hraham. of Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Margaret J., wife of David Hollabaugh ; 
James M, ; and Martha. 

James M. Furnish grew up on the home farm and 
wa« educatfd in the common schools. He worked 
for his father and took charge of the farm for a 
number of years and after his father's death he 
bought the old homestead. He does general farm- 



28 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



ing. Mr. Furnish is a republican in politics and a 
member of the Lutheran Church. 

May 13, 1880, he married Ida Steward. She was 
a native of DeKalb County and was educated in the 
common schools. They have three children : Ralph, 
a farmer living with his father ; Sudia, wife of Mel- 
vin Howey of DeKalb County; David, who is mar- 
ried and lives at Detroit, Michigan, where he is 
working with the Ford Automobile Works. 

John A. Barnes. Steuben County received its 
first permanent settlers during the decade of the 
•ws and it is rather unusual to find a family 
established here through four generations and with 
such an honorable record as farmers, good citizens 
and vigilant members of the community as that 
belonging to the Barnes connection. One of the 
representatives in the fourth generation is John 
A. Barnes, a young and progressive farmer ot Yorlc 
Township. , . ^ . ■ 

The first of the family in this county was his 
great-grandfather, Cowee Barnes, who was born 
Tune n 1788. September 5, 1809, he married Bridget 
Howard, who was born May 10, I79i- Cowee 
Barnes came to Steuben County m 1836. He was 
one of the settlers of that year in York Township. 
The first recorded settlers in the township arrived 
in 1836. Cowee Barnes entered 120 acres of wild 
land from the government, and before his death 
which occurred in 1855, had cleared up most of 
it and put it into cultivation and improved witli 
good buildings. The wife of Cowee Barnes died 
August 31, 1856. They had a fami y of ten chil- 
dren, a brief record of whom is as follows : George, 
born August 10, 1810; Betsie born July 6 1812; 
Hannah, born July 6, 1814; Edward, born Aprd 8, 
1817; Ira, born June 28, 1819; Cyrus, born April 11, 
18^2 • Abigail, born March 28, 1825; Abel M., born 
February H, 1827; John, born June 23, 1829; and 
Cecilia, born July 31, 1832- 

Of this family the next to the youngest, John 
Barnes, who as noted was born in 1829, was born 
in Delaware County, New York, and was seven 
years old when his parents came to Steuben County. 
He grew up in York Township and lived practically 
all his life on one farm, where his death occurred 
June 20, 1914. He married September 27. 1855, 
Julia Handley, who was born in Crawford County, 
Ohio, in 1838, and died February 6, 1906. They 
were' the parents of three children: Alverda 
Lucinda, born June 11, 1859, and died August 20, 
1861; Albert E., born July 11, 1862, and died June 
13, 1917: and Howard, born January 2, 1870. 

Albert E. Barnes acquired his early education 
in the district schools of York Township, and had 
a varied career as a farmer, beginning in York 
Township, living on rented farms in Fremont and 
Clear Lake townships, and finally retiring to the 
old homestead in sections 12 and 13 of York Town- 
ship, where he spent the rest of his life. Success 
attended his efforts and he owned 180 acres and 
most of the buildings still found on the farm were 
placed there under his direction. He married Octo- 
ber 15, 1885, Cora E. Hemry, born April i, 1867, a 
daughter of John Hemry, and of their two children 
the older. Vena, died February 20, 1888, at the age 
of eleven months. 

John A. Barnes was born while his parents were 
living in Fremont Township, May 5, 1890. He 
acquired his education in York Township, took a 
business course in the Tri-State Normal at Angola, 
and succeeded his father in the ownership and 
responsibility of the large farm of 180 acres in 
sections 12 and 13. He does general farming and is 



a breeder of Duroc hogs. Mr. Barnes is affiliated 
with Steuben Lodge No. 231 of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife are 
members of the Christian Church. 

December 21, 1912, he married Miss Dorothy 
Worthington, born March 24, 1894, daughter of 
William and Nettie Blanche Worthington, of Argus. 
They have two daughters, Cora Lucile, born De- 
cember 21, 1914, and Maxine, born April 25, 1919. 

William R. Wright, a member of a well-known 
family in Noble County, grew up and spent his boy- 
hood on a farm, but for many years has been iden- 
tified with commercial pursuits at Cromwell, where 
he is now the leading hardware merchant. 

He was born in Sparta Township, December 21, 
1869, son of Alexander and Margaret (Hull) 
Wright, and was the second oldest in their family. 
His parents were both natives of Ohio. William 
R. Wright, after getting his education, left home 
to make his own way in the world and for several 
years did farm work. He laid the foundation of 
his business career at Cromwell as clerk in a general 
store. He was employed by others for thirteen 
years, but since February i, 1909, has been pro- 
prietor of the hardware store and is one of the most 
successful merchants in that section of Noble 
County. 

Mr. Wright married Etta Galloway, a daughter 
of Anderson Galloway, a well-known Noble County 
citizen, elsewhere referred to in this publication. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wright have two children. Stanley 
A., born March 20, 189S, is a graduate of the Crom- 
well High School and is married. On June I, 1918, 
he enlisted in the navy and after a period of training 
at the Great Lakes was put on active duty, and dur- 
ing a portion of the war was stationed at Queens- 
town, Ireland. The daughter, Velma, is a graduate 
of the Cromwell High School, and is a proficient 
young business woman, being bookkeeper in the 
Sparta State Bank. 

Mr. Wright has served for the past eight years 
as town treasurer of Cromwell. He is a republican, 
is past chancellor of Cromwell Lodge No. 408, 
Knights of Pythias, is past noble grand of his 
Lodge of Odd Fellows, and is also active in 
Masonry, being affiliated with Fort Wayne Consis- 
tory of the Scottish Rite. 

Abijah D. Emerson, who recently left his farm in 
Salem Township to enter into a meat market business 
at Kendallville, has spent his life in Steuben County 
and is member of an old and historic family. On 
other pages of this publication is traced the interest- 
ing story of his grandfather, Avery Emerson, and 
other members of the family. 

Abijah D. Emerson was born on the old home- 
stead in Salem Township November 6, 1873, a son 
of Avery and Elizabeth (Parsell) Emerson. He 
acquired his education in the public schools, finishing 
the eighth grade, and since school days has been 
identified with farming. He now owns 127.84 acres 
of the old homestead, and has his land devoted to 
general farming and stock raising. He has made a 
specialty for some years of breeding road horses. 
He left the farm in the fall of 1918 and moved to 
Kendallville. He has a great many friends and is 
regarded as a man of ability in whatever line he 
undertakes. 

In politics he is independent and is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Modern 
Woodmen of America, while he and his wife are 
active in the Presbyterian Church. 

In 1895 he married Miss Clara Spears, a daughter 
of John and Emily A. (Helmer) Spears of Steuben 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



County. Mrs. Emerson died May s, 1912, the mother 
of six children : Mabel, wife of Samuel Greeno, 
who occupies the Emerson home farm ; Ned, who 
married Yalta Garver and has a son, Lee ; Emily, 
wife of Wayne Sherrick and the mother of one 
son, Ned; Gladys, Anna and Abijah D,, Jr., all 
members of the home circle. On September 7, 1918, 
Mr. Emerson married Miss Zola Hamlin, a daugh- 
ter of Albert and Clara Hamlin of Wolcottville. 

George M. Emerson, a son of Avery Emerson 
and a brother of A. D. Emerson of Kendallville, 
was born on the old Emerson homestead in Salem 
Township of Steuben County July 17, 1868. 

He grew up there, acquiring his education in the 
local district schools, and for thirty years has fol- 
lowed farming and stock raising as his business. 
He owns a farm of sixty-four acres, originally a 
part of the old Emerson homestead. Mr. Emerson 
is a democrat, but has aspired to no political office. 
He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and has been an active member of the lodge 
for twenty-five years and also belongs to the En- 
campment and to the Gleaners. Mrs. Emerson is 
a member of the United Presbyterian Church. 

April 30, 1896, he married Miss Ona Cleveland. 
She was born at Flint in Jackson Township October 
19, 1S71, a daughter of George and Nancy Cleve- 
land. Her father died in June, 1909, at the age of 
sixty-seven, and her mother is still living aged 
seventy-four. Air. and Mrs. Emerson have three 
children: George Cary, born January i, 1901, grad- 
uated from the Salem Center High School in 1918, 
and Elizabeth Nancy, born February 7, 1907, and 
Mildred Arvilla, born in August, 1908, both of whom 
are still diligently pursuing their studies in the com- 
mon schools. 

Charles C. Weincart has been a factor in the 
business and civic life of Noble County for a long 
period of years. He was for two terms postmaster 
of Kendallville, and since leaving that office has 
been a successful merchant. He gained his first 
business experience as clerk in the store of John 
Deibele. He worked for that one man twenty years 
and three months, and for the last ten years was 
manager of the hardware and general contracting 
department. In 1906 Mr. Weingart was elected 
a councilman at large and carefully looked after the 
interests of the city during his term. On August 22, 
1907, he was appointed postmaster by President 
Roosevelt and reappointed by President Taft De- 
cember 30, 191 1, serving altogether eight years and 
eleven months. 

In February, 1916, Mr. Weingart entered a part- 
nership with Carl F. Mabus under the name of 
Weingart & Mabus, dealing in men's furnishing 
goods. They established their store near the Noble 
County Bank and in 1917 bought the Toggery store. 
Mr. Weingart now gives his personal attention to 
this business. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with Kendallville 
Lodge No. 276, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
Mr. Weingart is a member and trustee of the Chris- 
tion Church, and in politics is a republican 

Robert L. Wade, M. D. Numbered among the 
successful physicians of Steuben County, Doctor 
Wade has been in practice at Fremont since 1907, and 
has given that community not only the benefit of his 
individual services but has extended the range of his 
work by founding at Fremont a private hospital. 

Doctor Wade is a self-made man and earned most 
of the money which took him through medical school. 
He was born in Springfield Township of LaGrange 
County, Indiana, March 18, 1877, a son of Henry M. 



and Christiana (Lupton) Wade. He spent his boy- 
hood days on his father's farm in Springfield Town- 
ship and attended the district schools there. Later 
he finished the teacher's course in the Tri-State 
Normal College at Angola, and it was his work as a 
teacher, carried on for six years in his native town- 
ship in LaGrange County, that enabled hirfl to enter 
and complete his work in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Chicago. He graduated in 1907, 
and in the same year located at Fremont, where he 
has had a very successful practice. In 1914 he built 
a modern brick hospital at the corner ofToledo and 
Pleasant streets, in which his office is located. He 
also owns a comfortable residence on East Toledo 
Street. He is a member of the County, State and 
American Medical associations. Doctor Wade has 
prospered and has acquired considerable property, 
and was one of the organizers of the First State 
Bank, which bought the Bank of Fremont. He has 
been on the Board of Directors since the organiza- 
tion. 

Doctor Wade is a republican, has served as a mem- 
ber of the City Council, School Board and the Ad- 
visorv Township Board, and is affiliated with North- 
east Lodge No. 210, Free and Accepted Masons, Fre- 
mont Chapter No. 68, Roval Arch Masons, and 
Fremont Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Church. 

In 1898 he married Miss Lura Talmage, only child 
of Charles E. and Emma (Joyce) Talmage, of 
Springfield Township, LaGrange County. Doctor and 
Mrs. Wade have three daughters: Mildred Joyce, 
born in December, 1898, is a graduate of the Fremont 
High School with the class of 191 7 and now assists 
her father in his office; Wilma, born in 1901 is a 
senior in the Fremont High School; and Bessie, 
born in 1902, is a junior in the high school. 

John James Oberlin. who for many years was a 
business man at Hamilton and is still living in a 
comfortable home in that village, while looking 
after his property interests, is a member of a family 
of early settlers in DeKalb County, where the name 
is represented by several distinct branches. 

John James Oberlin was born in Franklin Town- 
ship of that county June 4, i860, a son of Frederick 
D. and Sarah (Dirrim) Oberlin, and a grandson 
of the pioneer John Oberlin, who in 1845 came to 
DeKalb County and settled on the northwest quar- 
ter of section 28 in Franklin Township. He con- 
ducted a tannery in that locality for a number of 
years. 

Frederick D. Oberlin was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, February 5, 1830, and was fifteen years old 
when his father came to DeKalb County. He had 
many pioneer experiences and from an early age 
chose to be dependent largely upon his own efforts 
for self-support. In 1850 he bought forty acres of 
land for the sum of $300, and at the same time 
began work at the carpenter's trade, his employer 
paying him $10 a month for five years. In the 
course of time he had a large and well-appointed 
farm of 160 acres, and improved it with good house 
and buildings. He also lived in the Village of 
Hamilton for some years, and died there in 1912, 
at the age of eighty-two years, six months and six- 
teen days. In politics he was a republican, and he 
served as township trustee two years and three 
years as county commissioner. During the Civil 
war he was a member of Company G of the Fifty- 
Third Indiana Infantry, and participated in the 
battle of Kinston, North Carolina. He was 
affiliated with the Christian Church. February 12, 
He and his wife were Methodists and later became 



30 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



affiliated with the Chrisitan Church. February 12, 
1854, Frederick D. Oberlin married Sarah Dirrim, 
daughter of James Dirrim, another prominent early 
family in Northeastern Indiana. She was born in 
Carroll County, Ohio, January 25, 1836, and died 
at the home of her son John James, November 11, 
iqiS, aged seventy-nine years, nine months and 
sixteen days. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, and three are still living: Cyrus C, John 
James and Isaac Charles. 

John James Oberlin grew up on the homestead 
farm, had the benefit of the common schools, and 
through his industry as a farmer acquired a place 
of eighty acres in Franklin Township a half mile 
south of the Village of Hamilton. In 1892 he moved 
into Hamilton and for twenty years was in the 
livery business. Since then he has been looking 
after his farm and other interests, and enjoys the 
comforts of one of the best homes in Hamilton. 
Mr. Oberlin is a republican in politics and his family 
attend the Christian Church. In 1885 he married 
Miss Lenora Margaret Filer. She was born in 
Steuben County in 1867, a daughter of Lewis and 
Martha (Harpham) Fifer, early settlers of Steuben 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Oberlin have three children. 
Lula, who is the wife of Glen Gnagy, of the well- 
known Gnagy family of Steuben County. Glen 
Gnagy was in the war, serving at the Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. Roscoe Conkling Oberlin, 
the second child, lives at Hamilton and married 
Pearl Cecil Grear. Basil Jesse, the youngest, is 
managing his father's farm. He married Mertie 
Lemon, of Steuben County. 

John Reidenbach has been a resident of Noble 
County, Indiana, over sixty years, since birth, has 
been identified with farming in Elkhart Township 
forty years, and in material affairs as well as in 
good citizenship has well earned the place of pros- 
perity and esteem he enjoys. Mr. Reidenbach and 
family reside in section 34 of Elkhart Township. 

He was born in the same township, June 3, 1857, 
son of Philip and Catherine (Comin) Reidenbach. 
His father, who was born in Germany in 1820, came 
to America in 1840 and lived for several years in 
Tuscarawas County, Ohio. He married there Cath- 
erine Comin, who is also a native of Germany and 
had come to the United States at the age of twenty 
and settled in Tuscarawas County. In 1844 Philip 
Reidenbach moved to Indiana, settling in the 
woods of Elkhart Township of Noble County. He 
and his wife spent the rest of their days there, and 
were long known as people of solid industry and 
true worth. They were members of the German 
Methodist Church and the father was a democrat. 
In their family were nine children, and the follow- 
ing are still living: Christine, widow of William 
Miller; Malinda, wife of John Koch; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Koch ; John ; Philip, a farmer in Elkhart Town- 
ship ; and Mary, widow of Charles Ramer. 

John Reidenbach grew up on the old farm, and 
the first school he attended was kept in a log school- 
house. Later he was a student in the frame school-' 
house, and he made the best possible use of his op- 
portunities to acquire an education. At the age 
of twenty-one he married Emma Monk, who died 
with her only child. He married for his present 
wife Louise Schmidt, of Wayne County, Michigan. 
Mr. and Mrs. Reidenbach have the following chil- 
dren : George, a graduate of the common schools, 
married Helen Kirkpatrick; Ella, who completed a 
high school course, is the wife of Rudy Gill; Cora, 
who also had a high school education, is the wife of 
Oscar Yoder; Brady, a high school graduate, mar- 



ried Marie Stiffner; Roy, a high school graduate, 
served as a first sergeant with the American Expedi- 
tionary Forces in France; and Florence, who is a 
graduate of high school and is still at home. 

Mr. Reidenbach for many years has given his 
labors to the business of farming and stock raising 
on his place of 142 acres. He is also one of the 
directors of the Farmers State Bank of Wawaka. 
In politics he is a democrat, has served as supervisor 
of his township, and is a past chancellor and past 
member of the Grand Lodge of Wawaka Lodge No. 
432, Knights of Pythias. He and his family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
wliich he is a trustee and steward. 

Silas C. Cook is owner of one of the farms that 
have a history in Noble County. Most of it was 
acquired in a condition of absolute rawness fully 
sixty years ago by his father. In buildings, general 
improvements and productivity the Norwood Farm, 
as it is known, is recognized far and near as one 
of the best farm estates in the county. It comprises 
220 acres, and lies in the southwest quarter of section 
10, the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter 
of section 30, and twenty acres in Noble Township. 

It was on this farm that Silas C. Cook, its present 
proprietor, was born December 26, 1867. He is a 
son of Jonas and Elizabeth (Zigler) Cook. Jonas 
Cook was born in Carroll County, Maryland, De- 
cember ID, 1827, son of Baltzer and Elizabeth (Faulk- 
ner) Cook, both of German ancestry. Baltzer Cook 
and wife were also born in Maryland. He was a 
farmer by occupation. In 1830 he moved to Mont- 
gomery County, Ohio, and he and his wife spent the 
rest of their days there. Jonas Cook was only three 
years old when taken to Ohio. As a boy he lived 
on the farm and attended country schools. At the 
age of nineteen he began an apprenticeship at the 
carpenter's trade, and followed that as a business 
with marked success for fifteen years. It was with 
his savings and modest capital derived from his me- 
chanical skill that he came to Noble County in i8S9 
and bought 120 acres now included in the Norwood 
Farm. It was a big task he set himself to make a 
farm out of a portion of the primeval wilderness. 
But he steadily persevered and saw all his affairs 
prosper and increase. He bought other land until 
he owned 220 acres. On that farm he died in hon- 
ored old age in February, 1907, and his wife passed 
away June 4, 1905. He and Elizabeth Zigler were 
married in 1849. Silas C. Cook is the only one 
living of their three children. The daughter, Letitia, 
was married to E. C. Oldwine, and the son Gran- 
ville married Alta Smith. 

Jonas Cook in the fall of 1864 enlisted in Com- 
pany C of the Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, and was 
in the Union army about a year, receiving his hon- 
orable discharge and returning home in the fall of 
1865. He saw some active service during the siege 
of Richmond, was also at Fort Fisher and at Ben- 
tonville, where the last important battle of the war 
occurred. He was a loyal republican in politics and 
one of the leading members of the Dunkard Church 
in liis community. 

Silas C. Cook grew up on the old farm in Green 
Township, and besides the advantages of the com- 
mon schools attended Normal School at Albion and 
Valparaiso. Besides helping his father on the farm 
he taught school and was engaged in that profession 
altogether for about fifteen years. 

In i8gi Mr. Cook married Miss Emma Garber, 
who was born near Webster Lake in Indiana. After 
their marriage they located on the home farm, and 
have lived there continuously except for two and a 
half years in North Webster. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



31 



Mr. and Mrs. Cook are the parents of three tal- 
ented daughters : Elsie, a high school graduate and 
a former teacher, is now in the adjutant general's 
office at Washington, D. C. Mildred, also a grad- 
uate of high school and a former teacher, is now 
connected with the Gospel Trumpet Company at 
Anderson, Indiana. The youngest daughter, Eliza- 
beth, is still a student in high school. Mr. Cook 
is an active republican and has served as committee- 
man of Green Township. 

George Perry is one of the most interesting citi- 
zens and personalities in Noble County, particularly 
in the community of Swan Township where he has 
spent all his life, a period of four-score years. The 
Perrys are one of the oldest and most respected 
families of Noble County. 

The farm he now owns and occupies was the birth- 
place of George Perry. He was born there March 
21, 1839. When he first looked out upon the world 
with conscious eyes he saw practically the same 
scenes and environment which the earliest pioneers 
had encountered. He has witnessed every change 
and process in the making of Northeast Indiana 
what it is today. In that progress and development 
his own part has not been without honor and im- 
portance. 

His parents were Oliver L. and Mary (Francis) 
Perry, the former a native of New York State and 
the latter of Connecticut. After they married they 
bought forty acres of land in New York State. A 
brief residence upon it convinced him that it was 
practically worthless, and he soon disposed of it 
for much less than he paid and invested the remain- 
ing capital in four yoke of oxen and two wagons. 
In this manner he started westward. He journeyed 
through Canada, on to Michigan, and purposed to 
locate at Coldwater in the southern part of the state. 
All the good land had been taken up in and around 
Coldwater. News came to him of the construction 
of the canal from Fort Wayne connecting the waters 
of the Wabash Valley. He set out for this locality, 
which he deemed a region of new opportunity. On 
the way he crossed section 36 of Swan Township 
in Noble County. At that point his wife broke 
down with discouragement and weariness and per- 
suaded him to stop. He therefore entered 320 acres 
in section 36 and in that way was established the 
Perry family in Noble County, where they have 
been located for over eight years. Oliver Perry and 
wife spent the rest of their days on the old home- 
stead and during his lifetime fully 200 acres of it 
was cleared up and made useful for agriculture. He 
was a man of splendid integrity, a fine type of 
pioneer, and died at the age of fifty-six. He was a 
democrat in politics. His widow survived him some 
years. Of eight children only three are now living: 
George; Irene, wife of David Fair of Huntertown ; 
and J. Frederick, whose home is in Allen County, 
Indiana. 

George Perry had no really good schools to at- 
tend as a boy and part of his education was acquired 
in the old-fashioned subscription schools. As soon 
as his strength permitted he worked with his father 
in clearing up the land, and at the age of twenty- 
one hired out to his father by the month. Later 
he remained with his mother on the farm and 
eventuall3' succeeded to the ownership of most of 
it. On Alay, 1869, almost fifty years ago, Mr. 
Perry married Miss Rose Mickey. She was born in 
Ross County. Ohio. October 20. 1836, and was 
brought to Indiana by her parents in 1839. The 
Mickey family located in Whitley County near 
Churubsco, and in that locality Mrs. Perry grew 
to womanhood, familar with many of the same 



pioneer scenes as her husband. Mrs. Perry taught 
school five years, though her teaching was spread 
over a period of about twelve years. She was an 
excellent teacher and is still kindly remembered by 
many of her old pupils. Mr. and Mrs. Perry began 
housekeeping in May, 1S69, and they have lived on 
that one farm steadily now for fifty years and will 
soon celebrate their golden wedding anniversary. No 
children have come into their home. Both are faith- 
ful members of the United Brethren Church and 
Mr. Perry is a democrat in politics. He was once 
nominated for representative from Noble County. 
He is now practically retired from active responsi- 
bilities of farming, but owns 160 acres in the old 
homestead and at one time had 240 acres. 

Adam Orewilf.r is one of the representatives of 
the prominent family of that name identified with 
Steuben County since pioneer days, and like most 
of the name his work and chosen vocation has been 
farming. 

Mr. Orewiler was born on the Orewiler home- 
stead just across the road from where he now lives 
in Scott Township, February 25, 1859, and is a son 
of David and Lucy Orewiler. Other reference to 
the family is made in other pages of this publica- 
tion. Adam Orewiler grew up on the home farm, 
had a public school education, and has steadily 
devoted himself to agriculture for forty years. He 
still retains and manages a good farm of eighty 
acres and has given forty acres to his son. Mr. 
Orewiler is a republican without official aspirations 
and is a member of the Christian Church. 

In 18S4 he married Miss Hattie Tarr, a daughter 
of John and Sophia Tarr of Angola. Her mother 
is still living. 

The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Orewiler is Roy, 
born in I'SSs. He supplemented his public school 
education with a course in the Tri-State Normal 
College, and is making a good record as one of the 
younger farmers of Scott Township. He married 
Miss Mellie Maxton, of Steuben County, and they 
have two sons, Russell Dale and Keith Raymond. 

Joseph C. Kimmell. During the past quarter of 
a century no citizen has been more active in public 
and business aflfairs in Sparta Township than Joseph 
C. Kimmell. Mr. Kimmell is a former member of 
the State Legislature, also a former county auditor 
of Noble County, for years has done a large business 
as a farmer, and is now giving his time to his duties 
as cashier of the Sparta State Bank at Cromwell. 

He was born in Orange Township of Noble 
County. ."Vpril 28, 1872, a son of Cyrus and Ellen 
CLane) Kimmell, the former a native of Canton, 
Ohio, and the latter of Pickawav County in the 
same state. Their respective families came to In- 
diana in early days, locating in Noble County, 
where Cyrus and Ellen were married. They first 
lived on a farm in York Township and then moved 
to Orange Township, where he owned a fine farm of 
eighty acres. Cyrus Kimmell and family moved to 
Sparta Township in 1873, and purchased a farm of 
160 acres. He was an active member of the Church 
of God and in politics was a republican, serving at 
one time as assessor of York Township. Joseph C. 
Kimmell was the only child of his parents, and grew 
up in a good home, early had farming experience, 
and at the same time acquired a liberal education, 
partly in the common schools and afterward com- 
pleted a business course in the Tri-State Normal at 
.Angola. On May 18. 1893, he established a home of 
his own by his marriage to Lena A. Keehn, who was 
born in Perry Township of Noble County. After 



32 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



their marriage they settled on the old home farm, 
and that is still their home, where they enjoy the 
peace and contentment of rural life and the pros- 
perity which their broad and well tilled acres afford. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kimmel have five living children: 
Verlie, a graduate of the common schools, now a 
practical farmer; Joseph K., a high school graduate; 
Harriet, a junior in high school; Chester, who is 
also attending high school; and Mildred, in the 
first year of high school. The eldest daughter, 
Lera Eva, died April 20, 1910. aged sixteen years. 

The family are members of the Christian Church 
at Ligonier, Mr. Kimmell being one of the elders. 
He is affiliated with E.xcelsior Lodge No. 267 of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with the 
Masonic Order of Cromwell, and politically is a 
democrat. He was elected on that ticket to repre- 
sent Noble County in the Legislature in 1907, and 
gave a good account of himself to his constituents. 
He was elected and served as auditor of the county 
from 191 1 to 1914. The Sparta State Bank was 
organized in 1917 with the same ofiicers as at pres- 
ent, namely: Fred N. Hunt, president; George S. 
Bouse, vice president ; and J. C. Kimmell, cashier. 
The other directors are J. E. Hilter, J. E. Knapp, 
A. M. Snyer, N. S. Stump, Martin L. Hussey and 
Lee Lung. 

WiLLARD Slabaugh is a veteran of the Spanish- 
American war, and since the close of his service has 
been one of the successful farmers and stock raisers 
in Perry Township of Noble County. His home is 
in section 9, three and a half miles northwest of 
Ligonier. 

He was born in the same township December 8, 
1876. son of Christian and Catherine (Bowser) Sla- 
baugh. They were the parents of four children : 
Sidney, a farmer in Perry Township ; Willard ; Ollie, 
wife of John Larimer of Montana; and Ray, a 
farmer in Perry Township. 

Willard Slabaugh grew up on the home farm, at- 
tended the district schools, and was about twenty-one 
years of age when, soon after the outbreak of the 
Spanish-American war, he enlisted in Company L 
of the One Hundred and Fifty-Seventh Indiana Vol- 
unteers, under Colonel Studebaker. He was in the 
service for six months. 

Mr. Slabaugh married Miss Zinla Latta, who was 
born in Elkhart County, Indiana, a daughter of 
James T. and Abigail (Simpson) Latta. After their 
marriage they located on a farm in Perry Township, 
and tiirough a period of twenty years have been 
steadily prospering until they now have a farm oi 
161 acres in sections 9 and 16. Mr. Slabaugh is 
making a success of handling the pure bred Short- 
horn cattle and Duroc hogs. He is a stockholder in 
the Citizens Bank at Ligonier and is a democrat in 
politics. 

He and his wife have four children : Keith, who 
attended high school for a year and a half is now 
with his father on the farm ; Dorothy, in the third 
year of high school ; and Everett and Forrest. 

Willis Beigh. More than sixty years have passed 
since the Beigh family became established in Steuben 
County. Some of the family history is recorded 
on other pages, and at this point special mention is 
made of Willis Beigh, one of the prominent resi- 
dents and farmers of Salem Township. 

He was born in Jackson Township of the same 
county August 30, 1859, a son of John and Mary 
(Gooding) Beigh. He grew up on his father's 
farm and lived there until he was twenty-seven years 
of age, acquiring a good education in the public 
schools. For thirty-two years he has owned a half 



interest in 109^ acres in Salem Township, and 
later he bought I2j4 acres more. This farm is one 
of the good ones in Salem Township, is improved 
with good buildings, and is the basis of a very satis- 
factory business. Mr. Beigh is a republican, is 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows at Salem Center, and with his wife is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

November 18, 1886, he married Miss Sarah Bell 
Cary. She was born in Fairfield Township of De- 
Kalb County, Indiana. May 7, 1868. She was well 
educated, attending the Angola High School and 
Tri-State College, and for several years before her 
marriage was a teacher. Mrs. Beigh is a daughter 
of John and Christina (Helwig) Cary. Her father 
was born in the State of New York December 2, 
1841, and her mother in Troy Township of DeKalb 
County, July 29, 1842. Her grandparents were John 
W. and Martha (Cosper) Car}', early settlers of 
DeKalb County, and they lived on a farm east of 
Helmer for many years, and while living here the 
sons enlisted in the Civil war. John W. Cary died 
in May, 1880, and his wife in 1885, in York Town- 
ship, Stevens Count}', Indiana. They were the 
parents of the following children : David, who was 
a Union soldier and died near Helmer; Phineas, who 
was also in the Civil war and died at Henderson, 
Kentucky; John Wallace; Henry, a Civil war sol- 
dier who was buried at Nashville, Tennessee ; George 
W. ; Cassie, who died in childhood; and Alice. 

Mrs. Beigh's maternal grandparents were Jacob 
and Sarah (Gorsuch) Helwig, who were among the 
first settlers of DeKalb County. Jacob Helwig was 
a farmer, living first in Troy and later in Fairfield 
townships, and died in the latter locality in 1870. 
He was prominent in democratic politics, serving 
in the Legislature in early days. His wife died in 
1885, at the age of seventy-six. Jacob Helwig and 
wife had the following children : Barbara Ann, 
Kesiah, Mary, Rebecca and Christina. By a former 
marriage to Miss Jennings, Jacob Helwig had five 
children, George, Elizabeth, Peter, Isaac and John. 
John Helwig was a graduate of Wittenberg College 
at Springfield. Ohio, was a minister of the Lutheran 
Church, and later for some years was president of 
Wittenberg College. 

Mrs. Beigh's father after his marriage moved 
east of Salem Center, in Salem Township. In 
March, 1887, he moved to the farm now occupied by 
Mr. and Mrs. Beigh. John Cary died March 17, 
1910, and his wife on December 26, 1888. Mrs. 
Beigh was their only child. Her paternal grand- 
father was a prominent Methodist and a local 
preacher in the early days. Her maternal grand- 
father was equally prominent in the Lutheran 
Church as a layman and minister. 

William L. Braun is one of the older business 
men of Angola and for thirty-five years has been 
retailing meats to an appreciative public in that 
city. For nearly thirty years of this time he has 
been in business for himself. He has been suc- 
cessful, has prospered through his own abilities and 
industry, and is a man of high standing in the 
community. 

He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, September 
26, 1857, a son of Henrv Edward and Margaret 
(Heldt! Braun. His mother at the age of one 
year came from Alsace-Lorraine with her parents 
to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where John and Barbara 
Heldt spent their last years. Henry E. Braun was 
born in Saxony, Germany, February 28, 1831, learned 
the meat cutter's trade in the old country, and on 
coming to America worked at his trade in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, where he met and married his wife. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



33 



Later he moved to Waterloo, Indiana, and engaged 
in the meat business, and lived there until his death 
in IQII, at the age of seventy-nine. He was a 
prohibitionist in politics and a member of the 
Methodist Church. His widow died at the venerable 
age of eighty-two years. Their three children, all 
living, are Katie, William L. and George A., the 
latter of Auburn, Indiana. 

William L. Braun was but a child when his par- 
ents removed to Waterloo, and besides the instruc- 
tion he received from the public schools there he 
learned the trade of meat cutter under his father. 
In 1884 he came to Angola, and after seven years 
of working for others he engaged in business for 
himself in i8gi, and has always had the reputation 
of conducting one of the best markets and supplying 
the highest class of provisions. In politics he is a 
democrat, is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

In 1879 Mr. Braun married Miss Delia J. Stroh, 
who was born and reared in DeKalb County, and 
her people lived on a farm southeast of Waterloo. 
Mr. and Mrs. Braun have one daughter, Maud, now 
the wife of Mack Fisher. The three children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fisher are Malba Pauline, Ned Braun 
and Martha Jeanette. 

George D. Gaby. The first frame house built in 
Orange Township of Noble County was erected by 
the late Timothy Gaby, father of Ligonier's popular 
postmaster and prominent democratic leader in 
Noble County. The Gaby family in many ways 
have been prominent in this part of Northeast In- 
diana since early times. 

Credit is given to George D. Gaby for the achieve- 
ment of making, at least temporarily, a democratic 
county out of the normal republican complexion of 
Noble County. That was while he was chairman of 
the Democratic County Committee. Mr. Gaby does 
not give all his time to politics. He is a thorough 
business man, and for years has been a successful 
farmer. He owns a good farm in Orange Township, 
and was born on the old Gaby homestead there July 
4. 1853. His father, Timothy Gaby, was born in 
Genesee County, New York, in 1820, and went from 
that state to Ohio. There he married Amy A. Ed- 
monds, a native of Lorain County, Ohio. From 
Ohio they moved to Orange Township in Noble 
County, and Timothy bought or traded for land, 
and spent many busy years in cleaning it up and 
producing crops there. He died on the old farm in 
1912, at the age of ninety-two, one of the most 
highly respected citizens of that locality. His wife 
died about 1900. Of the family of seven children 
only two are now living, George D. and Charles E., 
the latter also a farmer in Orange Township. 

George D. Gaby grew up in his native township 
and acquired a common school education. At the 
age of twenty-four he entered the merchandise 
business at Brimfield and sold goods in that locality 
for eight years. After disposing of his store he 
returned to the old farm and bought out the other 
heirs and interests. He has a finely improved place 
of 190 acres, and he continued to make it his home 
and the scene of most of his business activities until 
he removed to Ligonier in 1913. 

Mr. Gaby served three terms as county chairman 
of the democratic party in Noble County. Some 
years ago he was nominated for the office of county 
auditor. Governor Marshall appointed him one of 
the trustees of the school for the feeble rninded at 
Fort Wayne, and he .served three years, resigning to 
accept the appointment by President Wilson as post- 



master of Ligonier. He is now in his second term 
of that office, his present term expiring in 1922. Mr. 
Gaby is a stockholder in the Albion National Bank. 
He is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks at Ligonier. May 13, 1880, he married 
Geneva V. Pancake, who was born in Elkhart Town- 
ship of Noble County in 1855, a daughter of Isaac 
Pancake. She was reared on a farm, received a 
good education in the district schools and in the 
schools of Ligonier, and is an active member of the 
Lutheran Church. Mr. and Mrs. Gaby have two 
sons, both of whom have finished high school and 
are practical farmers in Orange Township. Timothy 
E., the older, married Zelma Smith, of Jefferson 
Township, and they have an adopted daughter, 
Georgia V. Holland Roy, the second son, married 
Ruth Pancake, of Convoy, Ohio, and they have two 
children, Helen and Norman. 

Jasper N. Ott, who died June 24, 1919, gave maiiy 
hard working years to the business of farming in 
Green Township of Noble County. All the pros- 
perity he enjoyed and which he has so liberally dis- 
pensed to his family was the result of his own efforts 
and enterprise. He was an honored resident of that 
locality for forty years. His home was in the south 
half of the southeast quarter of section 19, Green 
Township. 

Mr. Ott was born in Benton Township of Elkhart 
County, Indiana, February 16, 1850, son of Jacob and 
Margaret (Gordy) Ott, the former a native of Preble 
County, Ohio, and the latter of Indiana. Jacob Ott 
came to Indiana at the age of twenty-two, located in 
Elkhart County, and two years later married and set- 
tled on a farm there. On leaving the farm he re- 
tired to Syracuse in Kosciusko County and lived 
there until his death. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Evangelical Church and in politics he 
was a very active republican. There were nine chil- 
dren in the family, seven of whom reached maturity, 
and the three living today are : John W., of Syra- 
cuse ; Julia A., unmarried and living at Syracuse; 
and Elmer, also of Syracuse. 

Jasper N. Ott while a boy on the home farm in 
Elkhart County attended the local schools, and lived 
in that county until he was about twenty-six years 
of age. October 28, 1875, Mr. Ott married Sarah 
Ott, a native of Noble County, Indiana. In 1876 
they moved to Noble County and located on eighty 
acres of brush grown and wet land. Mr. Ott under- 
took the tremendous task of making a farm with 
unlimited courage and energy, and for many years 
the soil has been drained and available for cultiva- 
tion, and he has given his farm all its improvements 
of value. He raised good grades of livestock. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ott became the parents of three 
daughters. Mary is the wife of William Hart. 
Laura married Eugene Ranee and lives near Ripley, 
Indiana. The daughter Effie is the wife of Willard 
More and is now deceased. Mr. Ott was an active 
member of the Durham Christian Chapel, as is also 
Mrs. Ott, and he was one of the trustees of the 
church and did much toward financing it. In poli- 
tics he was a republican. 

Chester E. Marsh, whose life for the most part 
has been spent in Steuben County, was born in 
Branch County, Michigan, June 3, 1853. He was 
only a small child when his parents, Ebenezer and 
Minerva (Gleason) Marsh, died, and after their 
death he was indebted to his aunt, Sally Marsh Lyon, 
for a home and his early training. 

Mr. Marsh was educated in the North Eastern 
Academy at Orland and later the Angola High 
School, and taught school for several years before 



34 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



he took up farming. To farming he gave his un- 
divided attention and with increasing success until 
he retired, and is now enjoying a comfortable home 
at Orland. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. . , ,,. T- r- 

April Tl, 1880, Mr. Marsh married Miss Eva C. 
Webb. She was born in Steuben County July S. 
1858, a daughter of Arthur and Amelia (Heath) 
Webb. Her father was a native of England and 
her mother of New York State, and both families 
were early settlers in Steuben County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Marsh have two children: Lizzie M., wife of 
Clyde Spangle of Jackson Township, Steuben 
County; and Elzie A., who was married to B. Frank- 
lin Collins. 

Clyde Spangle is owner of two handsome and 
productive farms in Northeast Indiana, and in 
every sense of the term is a progressive, up-to-date 
farmer and a citizen whose name is spoken with 
respect wherever known. 

His home farm in Jackson Township of Steuben 
County was the place of his birth. He first saw 
the light of day January 3, i877. and is a son of 
Henry and Sarah (Metzger) Spangle. His father 
was born in Steuben County, New York, in 1821, 
a son of Henry and Mary Spangle. He grew up 
in Seneca County and at the age of twenty-three 
came to Indiana, purchasing 160 acres m Jackson 
Township. Only six acres had been cleared, and 
eventually he brought under cultivation 120 acres 
and placed upon it some exceptional improvements. 
He died August 16, 1907, and his wife May 29, 1912. 
His wife was a daughter of Adam and Mary Metz- 
ger, who settled in Jackson Township of Steuben 
County. Henry Spangle and wife had two children, 
Carrie and Clyde. Carrie, who died in June, 1906, 
was the wife of Jacob Hellinger and she left three 
children, named Charles, Lucile and Basil. 

Clyde Spangle attended the district schools in 
Jackson Township, also at Orland, and since he was 
eighteen years of age has been farming the home- 
stead for' himself. He is owner of 2I2'4 acres in 
section 6 of Jackson Township, and also has 240 
acres in Springfield Township of LaGrange County. 
Both farms are improved with splendid buildings 
and for years these farms have been notable for the 
production of good live stock, 

December 30, 1903, Mr. Spangle married Lizzie 
M. Marsh, daughter of Chester and Eva (Webb) 
Marsh. Her mother was born in Jackson Township 
in 1859, a daughter of Arthur and Amelia Webb. 
Chester Marsh was born in Branch County, Mich- 
igan, a son of Ebenezer and Minerva (Gleason) 
Marsh, and was two years old when his father 
died and four when his mother passed away. Soon 
afterward he was brought to Millgrove Township 
of Steuben County and with the exception of three 
years in Michigan has been a resident of Steuben 
County ever since. His present home is at Orland. 
Mr. Marsh had two children, Lizzie M. and Elzie, 
the latter the wife of Frank Collins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spangle have two children : Henry, 
born January 15, 1914; and Evelyn, born March 23, 
1909. 

George Franklin Harding, a successful hardware 
merchant at Fremont, Indiana, has also been a 
farmer, and much of the interest of his career 
centers in the fact that he owns a tract of land 
that was taken up by his grandfather more than 
eighty years ago and constitutes one of the oldest 
farms in Jamestown Township of Steuben County. 

His paternal grandparents were George and 
Sophronia Harding. George Harding is credited 



with having made the third land entry in Jamestown 
Township, on June 27, 1835. Both tracts of land 
which he acquired are located on Hoab Lake. He 
became a permanent settler on this land in 1836. He 
was a native of England, had lived for several 
years in Detroit, and was connected with the 
original survey of the railroad between Elkhart and 
Toledo, and also did some work on the railroad 
between Detroit and Ypsilanti, Michigan. He died 
in 1892, at the venerable age of eighty-two, having 
spent his later years at Orland. He was three 
times married, and his second wife was the grand- 
mother of George Franklin Harding. 

George W. Harding, father of George Franklin, 
was born in Jamestown Township, on the old home- 
stead, March 4, 1845. He grew up in that locality, 
attended public schools there, and married Florence 
Flint. She was born at Kinderhook in Michigan 
in 1849. George W. Harding since 1886 has been 
a resident of Coldwater, Michigan, where he is asso- 
ciated with his son Ross W. in the implement busi- 
ness under the name Harding & Son. For many 
years he was a farmer in Jamestown Township and 
still owns a fine place of 200 acres there. Both he 
and his father were at one time extensively en- 
gaged in the breeding of pure bred Shorthorn 
cattle, and frequently exhibited this stock in fairs 
at Coldwater and Angola. George W. Harding is a 
republican, and was made a Mason at Fremont, 
Indiana, being affiliated with Northeastern Lodge 
No. 210, Free and Accepted Masons, with Fremont 
Chapter No. 5, Royal Arch Masons, Kendallville 
Commandery of the Knights Templar, and with the 
Knights of the Maccabees. His wife is a member 
of the Baptist Church, which the family attend. 
George W. Harding and wife had four sons : George 
F., Lewis K., Amos F. and Ross W. Amos died 
in 1905. 

George Franklin Harding, who was born on the 
old farm in Jamestown Township December 3, 1868, 
grew up there, attending the district schools, and 
later was a student in the Tri-State College at 
.'Angola, and from the age of seventeen made his 
home with his parents in Coldwater, Michigan. On 
January 12, 1893, he married Miss Fannie D. Pease, 
of Rolling Prairie, Indiana. Before her marriage 
she was an instructor in a business college at 
LaPorte, Indiana. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Harding returned to the old Harding home- 
stead once owned by his grandfather and lived 
there until 1914. He .still owns his homestead of 
195 acres, and rents the land. As a farmer cattle 
feeding was his chief and most profitable business. 
After moving to Fremont in 1914 Mr. Harding en- 
gaged in the hardware business with J. W. McClue, 
but after two years bought out his partner. 

He is a republican and served one term on the 
County Council. He is affiliated with Northeastern 
Lodge No. 210, Free and Accepted Masons, Fremont 
Chapter No. 48, Royal Arch Masons, Angola Coun- 
cil No. 27, Royal and Select Masons, and is a 
member of Coldwater Lodge No. 1023 of the Elks. 
He attends the Methodist Church, of which his wife 
is a member. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harding had six children : Bessie 
and Bernice, twins, the former dying at birth and 
the latter at one year of age ; George F., Jr., Floyd 
R., Florence L. and Ralph L. Two sons of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harding were in the war. George F., 
Jr., enlisted at Indianapolis in July, 1917, became 
first sergeant of Company B of the One Hundred 
and Thirty-Ninth Machine Gun Battalion, and is 
now at Camp Hancock, Georgia. He is a member 
of Northeastern Lodge No. 210, Free and Accepted 



typ 


^„^|^^^|^KK'^fK\<j4m^lR>i ^^^^^^^^ 



U<uf< ^i^c^-. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



1339775 



35 



Masons, and also of Khairum Lodge of Perfection 
No. 2 of the Scottish Rite. The son Floyd R. 
enlisted at Fremont in September, 1918, was sent 
to a scliool of instruction at \'alparaiso, later to 
the Carnegie Institute of Technology at Pittsburg, 
was located for a time at Fort Howard at Baltimore, 
then transferred to the Clerical School at Fortress 
Monroe. Virginia, and finally to Camp Sherman in 
Ohio, where he received his honorable discharge in 
January, 1919. 

Charles L. Schl.\b.\ch has been a merchant prac- 
tically all his active career at Cromwell, and for 
more than a quarter of a century has been one of the 
stanch citizens and upbuilders of that thriving little 
village of Noble County. 

His birth occurred on a farm four miles east of 
Cromwell in Sparta Township, June 10, 1869. His 
parents were \\'illiam and Sarah (Braucher) Schla- 
bach, his father born in Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1835, and his mother in Stark County, Ohio. 
They were married in Ohio and on coming to In- 
diana located in Noble County. William Schlabach 
though beginning life poor and gaining prosperity 
by his unaided efforts achieved prominence in this 
county. He made a farm of over 300 acres, and in 
many ways expressed his wise benevolence in behalf 
of those less fortunate than himself. He was an 
active member of the Sparta Christian Church, was 
a democrat and served four years as trustee of 
Sparta Township. He died in 1900, honored and 
respected all over the county. His wife pas«ed 
away in 1879. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, one of whom died in infancy. All the others 
are still living: Mrs. Y. Werker. of Cromwell; 
J. R.. of Cromwell; Anna, wife of James T. Iden, 
of Sparta Township; W. O., of South Bend. In- 
dian.n; Ella, wife of James Smith, of Ligonier ; M. 
A., of Fort Wayne, Indiana; Charles L., of Crom- 
well; Stella, wife of Alvin Moore, of Hartford City, 
Indiana : and Harry, of Kimmell, Indiana. 

Charles L. Schlabach lived on his father's farm 
to the age of eighteen and in the meantime ac- 
quired a good district school -education. He then 
joined his father in a mercantile enterprise and 
after two years bought the store at Cromwell, and 
has now been in business there, selling merchandise 
to a large circle of patrons for fully thirty years. 
He is also a stockholder in the Cromwell State 
Bank, is a democrat, like his father, and has filled 
all the chairs of the local lodges at Cromwell of the 
Knights of Pj-thias and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

April 27, 1893. he married Miss Minnie Kauff- 
man. Mrs. Schlabach is a highly educated woman, 
a graduate of the Ligonier public schools and took 
the musical course in Purdue University. They 
have one son, LaMar, born in 1904. and now in the 
first year of the high school. Mrs. Schlabach is 
an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and Mr. Schlabach gives liberal support to 
that church and to all other worthy causes in the 
community. 

Joseph E. Kn.\pp. Though he is vice president 
of the Wolf Lake State Bank and a director of the 
Sparta State Bank, Joseph E. Knapp is still living 
on his farm in Washington Township, a place which 
he started to clear and make into a farm fully half 
a century ago. It was his success as a substantial 
farmer that attracted the attention of his fellow 
citizens to his qualities and qualifications for public 
office and other places of trust. 



Mr. Knapp. who represents one of the oldest fam- 
ilies of Washington Township, was born in Sussex 
County, New Jersey, August 17, 1840, a son of 
August and Aiuia M. (WetzcO Knapp. His father 
was born in Prussian Poland and his mother in 
Baden, Germany. They reached New York City 
about 1830 and were married there, and August lived 
in that vicinity about five years working at his 
trade as a cabinet maker. He then lived several 
years in Pennsylvania, and from there located in 
Sussex County, New Jersey. In the spring of 1850 
he brou,ght his family to Noble County, Indiana, and 
acquired eighty acres in the woods of Washington 
Township. He cleared his land, and ever afterward 
was a substantial factor in that community until his 
death. He was active in the Christian Church, and 
as a republican was affiliated first with the whig and 
later with the republican party. He and his wife 
had ten children, and the five now living are: Fer- 
dinand; Joseph E. ; Amelia, wife of Aaron King; 
Cecelia, her twin sister, wife of Joseph Gerken ; and 
William B., a farmer in Washington Township. 

Joseph E. Knapp was ten years old when brought 
to Noble County, and the education he had begun in 
the East was continued in one of the familiar log 
schoolhouses of that time. He made good use of his 
educational opportunities, such as they were, and 
many men and women now grown to mature years 
gratefully recall his services as a teacher. Alto- 
gether he taught for thirteen terms. 

Mr. Knapp is also one of the honored veterans of 
the Civil war still living in Noble County. He en- 
listed February 72. 1862. and was a fighting soldier 
in the army of the Cumberland under General 
Thomas. He saw more than three years of service 
and was not mustered out until in December, 1865, 
while in Texas. For many years he has been a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Not 
long after his return from the army, on February 
24, 1867, he married Delilah Breninger. She was 
born in Ohio and was brought to Noble County when 
a girl. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Knapp 
started farming in Washington Township, and they 
came to their present locality in 1867. and the house 
in which Mr. Knapp still lives was built in that year. 
At that time it was completely surrounded by heavy 
woods, and his own labor.s cleared away the timber 
and gradually increased the area of cultivation. He 
had a very limited capital saved from his wages as 
a soldier, and this was used to start him after his 
marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Knapp had six children, two of 
whom died in infancy. Three are still living: Ed- 
ward E., a farmer in Washington Township; Ella, 
wife of John W. Adair, of Noble Township; and 
Charles M., who is a graduate of the Wolf Lake 
High School and married Grace Metz. Mr. Knapp 
is also proud of his eleven grandchildren. Mrs. 
Knapp died August 17, 1912, after they had been 
married forty-five years. 

Mr. Knapp is one of the extensive farmers of 
Noble County, owning three hundred and seventy 
acres of land. He owns stock in the Farmers Bank 
at Albion in addition to his interests as a stockholder 
and executive official of the Wolf Lake State Bank 
and the Sparta State Bank. He has been quite active 
in republican politics, serving two years as county 
chairman of the Central Committee, and for six 
years was a member of the Board of County Com- 
missioners. He has been active and liberal in sup- 
port and work with the Christian Church and its 
Sunday school, and is affiliated with the Knights of 
Prthias at Wolf Lake. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Charles Holsinger's home is one of the best im- 
proved farms in Allen Township of Noble County. 
It is a mile and a half southwest of Kendallville, and 
is the old Holsinger homestead, where the people of 
this name have lived since early times. 

Mr. Holsinger was born in Orange Township, near 
Rome City, December 8, 1869, son of William and 
Lucinda (Dyer) Holsinger. His father was a na- 
tive of Stark County, Ohio, and his mother of Noble 
County, Indiana. William Holsinger came to Noble 
County, Indiana, locating in Orange Township, 
where he married, and lived on a farm in that 
locality until he traded for the old homestead, but 
in 1903 sold out and moved to Kendallville, where he 
died. Both parents were active church members, 
and he was affiliated with the Masons and Knights 
of Pythias. There are only two living children, Wil- 
liam and Charles, the former a resident of Chicago. 

Charles Holsinger grew up in Noble County, at- 
tended the common schools and the high school, and 
since early manhood has industriously pursued the 
business of farming. Besides the operation of the 
old homestead he also does a rather extensive busi- 
ness buying stock cattle, feeding and fattening them, 
and selling them through the different markets. 

January 30, 1893, he married Miss May Knight. 
She was born at Leo, Indiana, and was educated 
in public and high schools. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Holsinger lived one year in Kendall- 
ville, then moved to their home farm, spent three 
years in Saranac County, Michigan, and sold their 
property in that county at an advantage and re- 
turned to Noble County and bought the Holsinger 
homestead in Allen Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holsinger have one son and three 
daughters: Walter, born in 1898, was educated in 
the grammar and high schools and is still at home; 
Bessie, a graduate of the high school at Columbus, 
Ohio; Helen, educated in the local public and high 
schools; and Lois, who is still in school. Mr. Hol- 
singer is affiliated with Kendallville Lodge No. 109, 
Knights of Pythias, and is a republican. 

John E. Borntreger. The Borntreger family is 
one of the large and important ones in LaGrange 
County, and its representatives stand for good gov- 
ernment, upright manhood and desirable and loyal 
citizenship. One of those bearing this honored 
name is John E. Borntreger of Newbury Town- 
ship, a man widely and favorably known. He was 
born in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, October g, 
1837, a son of Joseph and Barbara (Yoder) Born- 
treger, who made the trip overland from the Key- 
stone State to Indiana during the year 1841, in 
wagons, and bought land in Clinton Township, Elk- 
hart County, on which they lived for twelve years, 
moving then to Newbury Township, LaGrange 
County, and here purchasing 160 acres, to which 
they later added eighty acres. This continued the 
family home until the death of the father, April 
5, 1908. when he was ninety-six years eight months 
and one day of age, the mother having passed away 
October 2, 1888, aged seventy-seven years. Their 
children were as follows : Elizabeth, Christina, Bar- 
bara, John and David, all of whom were born in 
Pennsylvania ; and Eli, who was the first Amish 
Mennonite child born in Indiana who lived; Susan- 
nah, Rosa, Daniel, Rebecca, and Martha, all of 
whom were of Indiana birth. 

John Borntreger was brought up on his father's 
farm, learning how to operate it, and he also at- 
tended the public and private schools of his neigh- 
borhood. When he began farming for himself he 
settled on his present property, which he cleared, 
and he erected his present house, which replaced the 
little frame cabin in the woods he built with his 



own hands. At one time he owned 190 acres, but 
has sold some of it, so that he now has but 116 
acres, all of which is finely cultivated and improved. 

In 1864 Mr. Borntreger was married to Barbara 
Mishler, a daughter of Christian Mishler, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and 
Mrs. Borntreger became the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Catherine ; Samuel, who is deceased ; 
Eli ; Polly ; Joseph ; Lydia, who died at the age of 
four years; Anna; Menno; John; Barbara, who is 
deceased; Levi; and David. The first Mrs. Born- 
treger died May 16, 1900. On June 27, 1907, Mr. 
Borntreger was married to Mrs. Fannie Miller, 
widow of Levi L. Miller. Of the above children, 
Eli, who owns a portion of the old homestead, mar- 
ried Mattie Miller, and has five children. John, who 
is a farmer, responded to the call of his country 
during the World war and served in the National 
army for about a year, reaching France, having en- 
listed August 21, 1917, as a motor mechanic and 
was assigned to the Thirtieth Aero Squadron. He 
received his honorable discharge April 15, 1919. 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Borntreger belong to the 
old Amish Mennonite Church. When a young man 
Mr. Borntreger taught three terms in the district 
schools and three terms also in private school on 
the farm. 

Daniel A. Douglass, a former county auditor of 
Steuben County, has had a long and active career, 
and is prominent and well known both in that 
county and in Branch County, Michigan. He was 
at one time a county official of Michigan County. 

He was born in Livingston County, New York, 
November 12, 1843, a son of .'Alexander and Christie 
(McCall) Douglass. His father was born in Scot- 
land in 1809 and his mother in Livingston County, 
New York, in 1818. In February, 1863, the parents 
moved to Branch County, Michigan, locating on a 
farm four miles north of Fremont, Indiana. Alex- 
ander Douglass died in Steuben County in 1879 and 
his wife at the home of her son Daniel in 1901. 
Their children were Catherine, Jennie, Daniel A., 
Alexander, John, Mary and Lillie. Alexander 
Douglass was a republican, and he and his wife 
were devout Presbyterians. 

Daniel Douglass acquired his education in Liv- 
ingston County, New York, attended an academy in 
Wyoming County, that state, and was a young man 
when he accompanied his parents to Michigan. In 
September, 1864, he enlisted in Company G of the 
First Michigan Light Artillery, and was with that 
organization during the last year of hostilities. 
After that he returned to Branch County and took 
an active part in its business and civic affairs. In 
1879 he moved to Steuben County, locating in the 
village of Fremont, where he had his home until 
1900. In that year he moved to Angola to take up 
his duties as county auditor, to which he had been 
elected. He held that office nearly five years, one 
full term and ten months of over term. Mr. 
Douglass after selling his farm of 160 acres in 
Branch County bought a place of fifty acres in 
Fremont Township, later sold that, and now owns 
a place of 120 acres two miles east of Pleasant Lake 
in Steuben Township. He has always affiliated 
with the republican party. While living in Branch 
County he served as supervisor of California Town- 
ship and was elected register of deeds, beginning 
his official term January i, 1870. He is affiliated 
with the Masonic Lodge at Coldwater. During his 
residence at Fremont in addition to farming he was 
a traveling salesman for over twenty years. He is 
also a member of the Grand Army Post. 

Daniel Douglass married in 1870 Miss Ellen 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



37 



Averill, of Ontario. LaGrange County, daughter of 
James Averill. She died in 1803, the mother of two 
children : Claude Douglass, of Angola, and Agnes, 
who was married to William Stevens and has two 
sons, named William and Donald. The Stevens 
family live at Coldwater. Michigan. Daniel Douglass 
married for his second wife in 1907 Alta Wood, 
of Angola. 

Claude H. Dovgl.^ss. secretary of the Angola 
Bank Trust Company, has been one of the respon- 
sible men in commercial affairs in Angola for a 
quarter of a century, and his entire record justifies 
the confidence and esteem in which he is held. 

Mr. Douglass was born at Coldwater, Michigan, 
October 11, 1874, son of Daniel and Ellen (Averill) 
Douglass. When he w^s four years old his par- 
ents moved to Fremont, Steuben County, Indiana, 
and in that locality his boyhood was spent. He at- 
tended the local schools, also the high school, and he 
gained his first business experience as a clerk at 
Fremont. He also worked on a farm. On coming 
to Angola in 1894 Mr. Douglass was clerk in a local 
drygoods store for about three years, and then was 
associated in that line of business with W. C. Pat- 
terson. For five years he served as deputy county 
auditor, and then became interested in a private 
bank with G. R. Wickwire. In 1906 Mr. Douglass 
helped organize the Angola Bank Trust Compaay, 
and became its assistant secretary. Since 1916 he 
has been secretary of that solid financial institution. 

He is a republican in politics and is afhliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. He married in June, 1897, Miss Nora J. 
Hirst, of Angola, daughter of Joseph Hirst, now re- 
tired. To their marriage was born two sons, Robert 
H., born in 1899. at Fremont, and Joseph M., born in 
1908. The son Robert is now a student of engineer- 
ing in the Tri-State College. 

Hon. John H. Hoffman. During the greater 
part of his active career covering more than half a 
century, John H. Hoffman has been identified with 
business and other interests connected directly or 
indirectly with the public welfare. At Ligonier he 
is known as a merchant, farmer and banker, is also 
a former postmaster, and represented his county in 
the Legislature in the sessions of 1917 and 1919. 

He was born in DeKalb County, Indiana, Novem- 
ber 7, 1845, son of George R. and Sarah (Cramer) 
Hoffman. His parents were both born in Pennsyl- 
vania, his father in 1808. After their marriage 
they lived for several years at Gettysburg, but in 
1842 came to Indiana and located in DeKalb County. 
George R. Hoffman spent his active life as a farmer, 
and was also prominent in politics, serving as county 
recorder and in other county offices. He was a 
member of the Lutheran Church. In a family of 
six children John H. and his brother George H. are 
the only living survivors. His brother has long 
been prominent in South Dakota, where he still 
resides, and had the distinction of being the first 
lieutenant governor of that state. 

John H. Hoffman grew up on his father's farm 
in DeKalb County and had a common school educa- 
tion. At the age of sixteen he left home and school 
to enlist in the Forty-Fourth Indiana Infantry. He 
was in the army nearly a year. He was wounded 
at the battle of Shiloh in 1862, and that closed his 
actual service. Toward the close of the war he re- 
enlisted, but was never called to the front. After 
the war Mr. Hoffman attended school and for sev- 
eral years was a teacher. He removed to Ligonier 
in 1868 and from 1869 to 1873 was a teacher in 



local schools. Since 1872 Mr, Hoffman has been 
perhaps chiefly known as a factor in mercantile 
affairs at Ligonier through the book, stationery and 
office supply business. He became sole proprietor 
of his store in 1873, and two generations of patrons 
have bought their books and stationery from him. 

He is also one of the directors of the Farmers 
and Merchants Trust Company of Ligonier and is 
vice president and director of the Ligonier Refrig- 
erator factory. He owns a farm and gives much 
of his time to its management. 

Mr. Hoffman married Miss Mary C. Eldred. She 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, and when a girl 
came to Huntington County, Indiana, and in 1865 
to Ligonier. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman have no chil- 
dren. Mrs. Hoffman is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He has long been affiliated with 
the Grand Army of the Republic, with Post No. 125. 
He is a past grand of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, past chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias, and has sat in the Grand Lodges of both 
orders. Mr. Hoffman gave eight years to the man- 
agement of the Ligonier postoffice, serving under 
Harrison and McKinley. He has also served as 
town clerk and treasurer of Ligonier. He was 
elected a member of the Legislature in 1916 and re- 
elected in 1918. This is the only case in Noble 
County in which a representative to the Legislature 
has been elected for two successive terms. 

L. Wallace Wible is a prosperous farmer of 
Noble County, his place being two miles south and 
three quarters of a mile west of Kendallville in Allen 
Township. 

In this township he was born December 7, 1880, 
a son of C. L. and Verda (Halferty) Wible. The 
Wibles are an old established family in Noble 
County. C. L. Wible was born in Allen Township 
May 26, 1852, son of John and Lucinda (Varner) 
Wible. John Wible was a Pennsylvanian, came to 
Indiana after his marriage and located in Allen 
Township in 1850, living there the rest of his life. 
C. L. Wible grew up in this township, after his 
marriage located on a farm, and lived and died 
there. He and his wife were members of the Eng- 
lish Lutheran Church and he was one of the church 
officials. He was a republican. C. L. Wible and 
wife left two sons, L. Wallace and Roy E. The 
latter is a graduate of the common schools and is 
now living in Colorado, where he is a ranger in the 
employ of the United States Government. He mar- 
ried Bessie Stout. 

L. Wallace Wible grew up on the home farm in 
Allen Township, attended the district schools, and 
has steadily pursued the vocation to which he was 
trained as a boy. A number of years ago he bought 
the old farm of eighty acres, and devotes it to 
vegetables and onions, and livestock. 

In 1902 he married Miss Minnie Rimmel, daugh- 
ter of A. J. Rimmel. She was reared in Jefferson 
Township of Noble County. They have one son, 
Orville, born April 23, 1904, and now a student in 
the common schools. Mr. Wible is a republican. 

William P. Grannis, present trustee of Orange 
Township, Noble County, and a farmer of that 
locality, has been a resident of Noble County 
most of his active life and his own career and that 
of the family are closely identified with many points 
of interest in the history of Northeast Indiana. 

Mr. Grannis' home is syi miles northwest of Ken- 
dallville and 31/2 miles southeast of Wolcottville. 
On the farm where he now resides he was born May 
10, 1854. He is a son of Otis P. and Hannah 
(Creigh) Grannis. Creigh Lake, four miles north 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



of Kendallville, on the east side of the old Plant 
Road, was named for his maternal grandfather, 
Samuel Creigh, who located on the south side of that 
body of water in 1844. 

The Grannis family is of Scotch ancestry. To 
go back to the time of its earliest settlement in this 
country requires a leap over nearly three centuries. 
In 1644 Edward Grannis came from Scotland and 
settled at Southaven in Connecticut. Edward 
Grannis was born in 1630. The second generation 
was represented by John Grannis, born in 1674, the 
third by Enos Grannis, born in 1720, the fourth by 
Enos Grannis, Jr., born in 1754, the fifth by Palmer 
Grannis, born in 1787 ; the sixth by Otis P. Grannis, 
born March 2, 1825 ; while William P. Grannis is of 
the seventh generation in America. 

Palmer Grannis was born in Connecticut, was 
married there, took his family to Ohio and in the 
fall of 1834 moved to LaGrange County, Indiana. 
As one of the pioneers he entered land a few miles 
south of Lima, a farm now known as the Hoglund 
farm, between LaGrange and Howe. At that time 
the four adjoining counties were still called La- 
Grange, with Lima as the county seat. In 1836 the 
family moved to the Lima Mills, one mile west of 
Lima, where Palmer Grannis built a mill and oper- 
ated it until his death. He was the father of the 
following children : Orin M., Isaac P., Otis P., John 
W., Margaret, and Eliza. 

Otis P. Grannis was born in Portage County, 
Ohio, March 2, 1825, and in 1 83 1 moved with his 
parents to Geauga County in that state and was 
nine years of age when he came with them to La- 
Grange County. At the old Lima Mills he learned 
the miller's trade and followed it for nearly twenty- 
five years, working at Mongo, then called Union 
Mills, Fawn River, Michigan, Jamestown, Rome 
Cit}', the Minot Mill, Kendallville and the Tamarack. 
For ten years Indians were his associates, and he 
became fluent in their language, and was presented 
with a bow and some arrows by one of the chiefs 
of the Pottawatomies. In 1846 he went to Con- 
necticut and lived with his uncle, Alva Merriman, 
at New Milford, for about a year. On returning to 
Indiana in 1847 he bought the land where his son 
William P. now lives. At Sturgis, Michigan, Sep- 
tember 27, 1849, he married Hannah Creigh, and 
they began housekeeping at Jamestown in Steuben 
County, but in the spring of 1850 returned to his 
farm in Orange Township of Noble County. The 
next fall they went back to Jamestown and in the 
spring of 1852 went to Rome City, where Otis P. 
Grannis fitted up the burrs for the flouring mill 
and ground the first grain in the Rome City Mills, 
conducting it for eighteen months, until he re- 
turned to the farm. In 1856 he bought a farm, 
sawmill and flouring mill just across the county 
line in LaGrange County, at the Tamarack. It was 
there that William Grannis learned the miller's trade, 
and he did the grinding for ' a number of years. 
The day following Buchanan's election in 1856 Otis 
P. Grannis moved there and was business manager 
of the two mills for twenty-four years. In the 
fall of 1880 he sold out the mill, the pond was 
drained, and thus ended one of the landmarks in 
that part of the country. In 1895 he moved to 
Wolcottville, where his wife died in 1899, and he 
continued to live there until September, 1902. His 
last days were spent at the home of his son, Wil- 
liam P., on the old farm in Orange Township, 
where he died May 12, 1903. He and his wife had 
three children : William P., Charles O., of Wol- 
cottville, and Frank C, of Howard City, Michigan. 
While he played a very important part as a miller 
Otis P. Grannis should be remembered for his 
efifective and sterling citizenship. He gave efficient 



aid to the movement which vigorously suppressed 
the organized desperadoes who by their thieving 
and murdering terrified the early settlers. He was 
secretary of the first organized regulators at the 
Tamarack and helped make some of the important 
arrests. Among the outlaws whom he helped to 
bring to justice were Malcolm Burnam, Miles C. 
Payne and Gregory McDougal. He was present at 
the hanging of McDougal at Diamond Lake in Noble 
County, January 26, 1858. He was Payne's guard 
at Ligonier and persuaded him to make a full con- 
fession, which practically put an end to the activi- 
ties of "black legs." 

He was also an active stock dealer for twenty- 
five years and for many years shipped more stock 
than any other dealer on the Lake Shore Railroad 
between Chicago and Buffalo. 

William P. Grannis, the son of this honored 
pioneer, has been a resident of Noble County con- 
tinuously since 1884. On December 6, i88.-! he 
married Miss Ella Wert. She was born in DeKalb 
County, Indiana, in July, 1859. They have one 
daughter. Vera L., born February 27, 1900, now 
attending the Rome City High School. 

Mr. Grannis is a republican, has served as presi- 
dent of the advisory board, and on April i, 1918, 
was appointed trustee of Orange Township. In 
that township he owns and cultivates a fine farm 
of eighty acres. 

Dewitt Clinton Salisbury for many years has: Hi 
been one of the chief factors in promoting business;." 
affairs at Orland. He is president of the bank and 
head of the Creamery Company, and is still inter- 
ested in farming, a vocation he followed for many 
years. 

Mr. Salisbury, who was born March 15, 1857, 
represents two of the very old and prominent fam- 
ilies of Steuben County. His father, Chester D. 
Salisbury, who came to Steuben County in 1836, 
was born in Jefferson County, New York, in 181 7, a 
son of Edgar and Susanna (Gore) Salisbury, na- 
tives of Vermont. Hezekiah, father of Edgar, was 
at one time owner of the land on which is situated 
the City of Brattleboro. Vermont. Edgar Salisbury 
was a soldier in the War of 1812. Chester D. Salis- 
bury was only eight years old when his father died. 
That put the widowed mother and the young chil- 
dren largely on their own responsibilities. At the 
age of eleven Chester went into cedar swamps to as- 
sist in making rails. He had no opportunity to 
attend school until after he reached manhood. He 
learned the trade of tanner, but in 1836 left his 
master and came to Indiana. He reached this state 
with only half a shilling or twelve and a half cents. 
His first location was in Jamestown Township, 
where he burned lime two years. He then opened 
up and improved the farm in the locality known as 
Nevada, but after four years moved to Millgrove 
Township, and settled on land that he gradually 
improved until he had over 200 acres, said to con- 
stitute at one time one of the best farms in the 
county. He married in 1838 Julia Collins, daughter 
of Barton and Anna Collins. Her parents were the 
first settlers in Jamestown Township. 

Dewitt Clinton Salisbury was one of a family of 
six children, and he grew up on his father's home- 
stead in Millgrove Township. He attended the dis- 
trict schools, also the Orland Academy, and during 
his mature career he acquired 117 acres of the old 
homestead of 180 acres, and was prosperously en- 
gaged in farming there until he sold his place sev- 
eral years ago. Mr, Salisbury has been a resident 
of Orland since 1910. He is one of the directors of 
the Citizens State Bank and has been its president 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



for about seven years^ He is secretary of the Mill- 
grove Creamery Cornpany and owns a forty-acre 
farm a half mile south of Orland. 

He is active in republican politics, and for the past 
four years served as trustee of Millgrove Town- 
ship. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge at 
Orland and of the Congregational Church. August 
8. 1878, he married Ella Reed, daugliter of William 
Reed, of LaGrange County. 

J. L. Henry has long sustained a reputation as 
one of the energetic and substantial business men of 
Northeastern Indiana, was for many years a mer- 
chant at Avilla, and is known in every community 
of Noble County by the service he rendered as 
county auditor. He is now secretary and treasurer 
of the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of 
Ligonier. 

He was born in Wood County. West Virginia, July 
2y, 1 861. His father, Gabriel S. Henry, was born 
in Jefferson County, Ohio, November 5, 1831, and 
married Sophia McKenzie, who was born in the 
same state August 4, 1831. In November, 1865, he 
and his family came to Noble County, Indiana, and 
settled in .'Mien Township. They lived there until 
189J. Both Gabriel Henry and his wife are now 
deceased. Their children were: Martha J., wife of 
Henry Gettle ; Margaret C, who died March 14, 
iQOo: Elizabeth, wife of A. C. Shambaugh; John 
L., of Ligionier; Robert A., of Kendallville, In- 
diana; Ida B., wife of H. L, Ashew. of Fort Wayne. 
Indiana ; and William F., now deceased. 

John L. Henry was about four years old when his 
parents came to Noble County, and he grew up in 
Allen Township, acquiring a good education in the 
public schools. He graduated from the schools of 
Kendallville, and in 1880 became associated with his 
father in the furniture business at Avilla. While 
there he was appointed and served as postmaster 
and since early manhood has been one of the influ- 
ential members of the republican party in Noble 
County. He was elected on that ticket as county 
auditor, and showed that he was deserving of the 
honor by the marked success of his administration 
in the office during four years. Upon the organiza- 
tion of the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company 
of Ligonier Mr. Henry was elected secretary. On 
January 12, 1909, he was also elected treasurer to fill 
a vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Weir, since 
which time he has "filled the position of secretary- 
treasurer of the Trust Company and is one of the 
efficient members of that corporation. 

December 24, 1882. he married Emma G. Haines, 
a daughter of Robert S. and Permelia (Baum) 
Haines. Mrs. Henry was born August 31, 1863, in 
Avilla. To their marriage were born two children, 
Perma, who died at the age of four and a half 
years, and Marjorie A. Mr. Henry is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite lilason. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Charlf.s N. Clixe was educated for the medical 
pro,fession, but has found himself in a more con- 
genial sphere as a business man. He is member 
of the firm Cline Brothers, lumber merchants at 
Kendallville. 

Mr. Cline was born at Hartford City, Indiana, 
January 29, 1875, son of William W. Cline, who was 
born in Blackford Count}', Indiana, in October, 1837, 
and a grandson of Michael Cline. William W. Cline 
grew up in Hartford City, learned a trade and fol- 
lowed it until about 1872. In that year he_ opened 
a factory for the manufacture of drain tile, and 



was the first man in his section of Indiana to intro- 
duce the clay drain tile. He finally gave up man- 
ufacturing and went on a farm, and is still living 
on his farm near Hartford City, though retired from 
its responsibilities. His wife, who died in 1889, was 
Harriet A. Chaffee. They had eight children, two 
of whom died in infancy. Orlo L., a graduate of 
De Pauw University, is a successful attorney at 
Marion, Indiana; Lora is the wife of Finley Geiger, 
and she lives on the old homestead with her father ; 
Albert B. is a resident of Bluffton, Indiana; Lillie, 
a graduate of De Pauw University, is the wife of 
John E. Higdon, a graduate from the same school 
and now an actuary in an insurance department in 
Chicago; Charles N. ; and Edith, a graduate of 
De Pauw University, is the wife of Harlan H. York, 
professor of biology in Brown University at Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 

Charles N. Cline grew up on his father's farm. 
He is a graduate of the Hartford City High School, 
and took his medical degree from Indiana Medical 
College at Indianapolis. He was also a student at 
Purdue University two vears. Instead of practicing 
medicine he removed to Bluffton in 1892 and became 
associated with his brother, A. B. Cline, in the 
lumber business. In February, 1904, he came to 
Kendallville, and has since been manager and pro- 
prietor of the plant of Cline Brothers in this city. 

Mr. Cline married Miss Edna Hutchinson. She 
is a graduate of the Hartford City High School and 
was a teacher before her marriage. They have two 
daughters ; Gertrude and Lucile, both attending 
the public schools at Kendallville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cline are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and he is a trustee and on the Official Board. 
He is an Odd Fellow, a republican voter, and is a 
stockholder in the Noble Truck Corporation. 

John A. Bontrager. One of the distinctive 
features of LaGrange County is that a number of 
its most substantial and successful farmers are 
native sons of this region, who have given to it a 
lifetime of effort, and are rewarded by a gratifying 
prosperity which is well merited, because it has 
come through hard work and careful saving. The 
Bontrager family is a large one in this county, 
and many of its members, born and bred within the 
confines of LaGrange, have found congenial em- 
ployment on their fertile farms in the several town- 
ships. One of them is John A. Bontrager of New- 
bury Township. He was born in this same town- 
ship October 5, 1856, a son of Amos Bontrager, 
a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this 
work. 

Growing up ' on his father's homestead, John 
Bontrager was early taught to make himself use- 
ful, as well as the fundamentals of a common school 
education, and as his attention was thus directed to 
farming it is not remarkable that he chose it for his 
life work. In 1879 he bought eighty acres of land 
covered with timber, to which he has added until 
he owns 100 acres of land, all of which is under 
cultivation, and here he carries on general farming 
and stockraising, specializing in pure bred Hereford 
cattle. His comfortable residence and large barns 
are built with lumber cut from the farm. In re- 
ligious views Mr. Bontrager is an Amish Menno- 
nite. 

In 1880 John Bontrager was married to Sarah 
Harshbarger, a daughter of Abram Harshbarger, 
who now resides in Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Bon- 
trager have had the following children born to 
them: Holly J., who lives at Shipshewana, In- 
diana; Todd, who lives at LaGrange, married Kate 
Hostetter, and has no children ; Sadie, who died 
at the age of four months. All of the work of 



40 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



clearing off the farm devolved upon Mr. Bon- 
trager, but he managed to do it, and also to en- 
gage in the additional task of putting in his crops 
as he made ready the land. No one who has not 
done this kind of work has any idea of how hard 
it is, nor how discouraging, but there does come 
a time when things begin to count, and from then 
on the way is clear. No matter, however, how hard 
Mr. Bontrager might have worked had he not have 
been willing to save and known how to invest his 
money so as to make it work for him he would 
not be today as well-to-do as he is. It takes brains 
as well as hard work to gather together any of this 
world's goods, as Mr. Bontrager and a number of 
other LaGrange County men have proven. The 
young people growing up about them will do well to 
follow their example, and not only live within their 
means but out of every dollar earned put by a 
little for investment so that when old age cornes 
they will have something to show for their life 
work. 

Frederick A. Emerson, representing one of the 
oldest families of Steuben County, is essentially a 
business man, and had a wide and varied experience 
in business affairs for many years. He is now serv- 
ing his second term as postmaster of Angola. 

His grandfather, Avery Emerson, Sr., who was 
born in New Hampshire, September 22, 1788, re- 
moved in early manhood to Auburn, New York, 
where he married Sophronia Allen, who was born 
in Massachusetts in February, 1799. The Emerson 
family moved to Richland County, Ohio, in 1820, and 
in June, 1836, again became pioneers, when they 
located in Steuben County, Indiana. Avery Emer- 
son's place of settlement was in section 22 of 
Salem Township, on what was known as the "Indian 
fields." Remains of Indian corn cultivation could 
still be seen. They were among the three or four 
families who first located in that township, and 
Avery Emerson served as the first justice of the 
peace, and in that capacity officiated at the first 
wedding in the township. From 1841 to 1849 he 
held the office of probate judge. He sold his farm 
in 1S67 and moved to Angola, and later went to 
Kendailville, where he died the following October. 
His wife passed away March 17, 1877. In many 
other ways Avery Emerson, Sr., was one of the men 
who made early history in Steuben County. He was 
a whig and later a republican. He and his wife had 
ten children. 

Avery Emerson, Jr., father of Frederick A., was 
born in Richland County, Ohio, in 1827, and was 
nine years old when brought to Steuben County, 
where he spent practically all his life. He married 
Elizabeth S. Parsell, daughter of Moses S. Parsell, 
who arrived in Steuben County in 1838. Avery 
Emerson and wife had nine children, seven sons and 
two daughters. He owned a large farm in Salem 
Township, and to that gave the best years of his 
active manhood. 

Frederick A. Emerson was born on the old home- 
stead in Salem Township, December 20, 1865. While 
growing up there he attended the district schools, 
later took a business course in the Tri-State Normal, 
and had his first business experience as a merchant 
at Kendailville. In 1893 he returned to Angola, and 
clerked for Summerlot and Smith, grocers, for four 
years was with John W. Snyder, in the hardware 
business, and continued one year in the same store 
for Charles A. Bachelor. For two years he was a 
member of the Angola Granite Company, the firm 
being Emerson, Kinney & Slade. Selling his in- 
terests there he traveled two years as a salesman 
for E. Bement Sons, of Lansing, Michigan, dealers 



in stoves and implements. He was then with the 
Germer Stove Company, and represented that firm 
eleven years. 

Mr. Emerson was first appointed postmaster at 
Angola by President Wilson, February 11, 1914, and 
was reappointed September 6, 1918. Politically he is 
a good democrat and fraternally is affiliated with 
the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, at Angola, and with the Elks Lodge 
at Ligonier. He and his family attend worship in 
the Congregational Church. 

May 9, 1893, Mr. Emerson married Miss Ina L. 
Craig, of Angola, daughter of Andrew and Mary 
Craig. Her widowed mother is now living with Mr. 
and Mrs. Emerson. The latter have good reason to 
be proud of their three young sons, two of whom 
were soldiers in the great war. The youngest, 
Lawrence Douglas, born December 11, 1905, is now 
in the Angola High School. The oldest is Kenton 
Craig, born December 4, 1895. He is a graduate of 
the Angola High School, the Tri-State Normal 
College and took the engineering course there. He 
enlisted and was mustered into the army service 
September 4, 1917, at Fort Crook, Nebraska, as a 
member of Motor Truck Company No. 315. He was 
transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison in Novem- 
ber, 1917, and left for overseas duty December 31, 
1917. During practically all the war, beginning 
early in 1918, he was in active duty in France as a 
traffic engineer, and was still in the service in 
August, 1919. The second son, John Thomas, born 
September 11, 1897, also graduated from the high 
school and the Tri-State Normal College, and first 
went into the army in the Hospital Corps of the 
National Guard. He was on the Mexican border 
during part of the year 191 7, having been mustered 
in in January of that year. He was called back into 
active service August 4, 1917. was first located at 
South Bend and later at Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
and from there transferred to Hattiesburg, Missis- 
sippi. He was in the officers training school at 
Camp Taylor, Kentucky, and was graduated and 
commissioned second lieutenant October 29, 1918. 
He was then sent to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, 
where he remained until after the signing of the 
armistice and his muster out. 

Melvin L. Werker. one of the leading business 
men of Kimmell, has had experience both as a prac- 
tical farmer and as a merchant, and is one of the 
busy young men of his community whose services 
are most frequently sought in any community enter- 
prise. 

He was born in Sparta Township of Noble Coun- 
ty, August 23, 1878, a son of Y. and Clara (Schla- 
bach) Werker. His father was born in Germany, 
July 4, 1847, and his mother in Ohio, November 6, 
1856. The father came to America with his par- 
ents at the age of four years, the family first locat- 
ing in Ohio, and later both the Werkers and Schla- 
bachs moved to Noble County, Indiana, where the 
parents married. They located on a farm in Sparta 
Township, but the father is now living retired in 
Cromwell. He is a democrat in politics. Melvin L. 
Werker is one of a family of seven sons : Charles, 
a farmer in Sparta Township ; William, a farmer in 
Iowa ; Melvin L. ; Wallace, a farmer in Sparta 
Township; John, who has farming interests in Mon- 
tana; Orlo, a Sparta Township farmer; and 
Harvey. 

Melvin L. Werker grew up on the home place in 
Sparta Township, was educated in the local schools, 
and lived at home with his father to the age of 
twenty-one. 

February II, 1903, he married Lena R. Deardorf, 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



41 



who was born in Noble County and was educated 
in the common schools. After his marriage Mr. 
Werker settled on a farm in York Township, later 
spent a year as a farmer in Sparta Township, and 
moving from there to Cromwell gained a thorough 
knowledge of merchandising as clerk in a general 
store. He spent nine years in that business, and 
then returned to a farm in Sparta Township and 
resumed agriculture for four years. In 1916 he 
bought his present store and stock of goods in 
Kimmell. and is now head of a very prosperous and 
thriving business. He is also a stockholder in the 
State Bank of Kimmell. 

Mr. Werker and family are members of the 
Sparta Christian Church. He is a democrat, and 
is affiliated with Cromwell Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. He and his wife have two children, both 
attending school, Merritt being thirteen and Esther 
eleven years old. 

Thomas Kelham is the present trustee of Allen 
Township, Noble County. His public position is in 
many respects a reflection of the very able manner 
in which he has prosecuted his private affairs for 
many years. Mr. Kelham has been a resident of 
Noble County since early manhood, is a very suc- 
cessful farmer and land owner, and is a man who 
began life with very modest capital and has suc- 
ceeded beyond his sanguine expectations. 

He was born in Richland County, Ohio, in 1853, 
son of Edward and Sarah (Fownend) Kelham. His 
father was born in England October 13, 1812, and 
came to the United States at the age of twenty-two. 
His first home was near Sandusky, Ohio, where for 
a time he was employed with the construction forces 
of what is now the Baltimore & Ohio Railway, He 
married at Shelby, Ohio, and for a time lived on a 
farm, but in 1858 came to Indiana and located in 
DeKalb County, near Avilla. He was a farmer 
there the rest of his life. He served as a county 
commissioner, was a democrat, and a man highly 
esteemed all over DeKalb County. Of nine children 
six are still living: Thomas; Edward, of DeKalb 
County; Joseph, of Noble County; George, whose 
home is in Swan Township of Noble County; 
Charles, a resident of Idaho ; and Mary, widow of 
David Turner, of Garrett, Indiana. 

Thomas Kelham grew up on his father's farm in 
DtKalb County, attended the district schools, and 
lived at home until twenty-one. The next three 
years he worked out at common wages and relied 
upon his own energies to get his start in life. Mr. 
Kelham married Miss Emma L. Lobdell. She was 
born and reared in Noble County. 

After their marriage they rented a farm and they 
made their first purchase of land when they bought 
forty acres. Mr. Kelham now owns what amounts 
to a large estate. It was acquired by a gradual 
process, buying as opportunity and means justified, 
until his present farm near Avilla comprises 300 
acres, and he also owns a large ranch of 1200 acres 
in Montana. 

Mr. Kelham was actively identified with the man- 
agement of his farm and lived in the country until 
1912, when he moved to Avilla, from which point 
he looks after a varied line of business undertakings. 
He was one of the organizers of the Avilla Tele- 
phone Company, its first president and is still pres- 
ident of the company. He is one of the leading 
democrats of the county, and he served a regularly 
elected term as trustee of Allen Township from 
1904 to 1908. He is the present trustee by virtue 
of appointment to that office in 1916. Fraternally 
he is a past master of Avilla Lodge No. 460, .\ncient 
Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. and Mrs. Kelham 



are active members of the Evangelical Church, and 
he is one of its trustees. 

He and his wife had six children: Annetta, de- 
ceased wife of Samuel Scheurich ; Alda Z., wife of 
Leroy Zellars ; Frank E., a farmer near Avilla; 
James W., who lives on the old home farm near 
Avilla ; Fred, who died at the age of twenty-two ; 
and John C, who died December 6, 1918, aged 
twenty-four years. All of these children are grad- 
uates of high school and John completed the course 
of the Michigan Agricultural College. 

Henry J. Herrick, whose long and active career 
as a farmer, lawyer and banker has made him widely 
and favorably known in Northeast Indiana and in 
other states, came to DeKalb County when an in- 
fant more than eighty years ago, and his father 
at one time was one of the largest land owners 
in that county. 

Mr. Herrick, whose present home is on his farm 
of 118 acres in Concord Township, a mile south of 
Newville, was born at Norwalk. Ohio, August 9, 
1835, a son of Lot and Lola (SutlifT) Herrick. His 
father was born in Herkimer County, New York, 
and his mother in Connecticut. The parents were 
married in Ohio. Lola Sutliff was an Ohio teacher, 
and under her supervision Lot Herrick learned to 
read and write. In 1836 the Herrick family came 
to Indiana and settled on the banks of the St. 
Joseph River, about twenty-six miles northeast of 
Fort Wayne. Lot Herrick acquired extensive tracts 
of land in and around that locality and he and his 
wife spent the rest of their days as farmers. They 
were members of the Presbyterian Church and he 
entered politics as a whig voter but subsequently 
was a democrat. He was elected probate judge of 
DeKalb County in early days. There were ei.ght 
children in the Lot Herrick family, Henry J. being 
the only one now living. 

Mr. Herrick was a year old when his parents 
carne to DeKalb County, He secured his early 
training in a log school house, but made good use 
of his opportunities and for about eight years was 
a successful teacher. He entered the law department 
of the University of Michigan and was a member 
of the first graduating class in 1862, when he re- 
ceived the LL. B. degree. For one year he prac- 
ticed in DeKalb County and in 1863, during Civil 
war times, he moved to Northwestern Missouri, 
practiced at Princeton until he went into the Union 
army and served as assistant adjutant general under 
General Pratt. He was in the army until June IS, 
1866, After that Mr, Herrick practiced at Tren- 
ton, Missouri, and finally moved to the southern 
part of that state. He was a Missouri lawyer for 
thirty years, and while living at Trenton held the 
office of prosecuting attorney for several years. 

Mr. Herrick married Sarah Fusselman, a native 
of DeKalb County. She died while they were resi- 
dents of Missouri, and her only child died at the 
age of nine years. 

Mr. Herrick was active in the banking business 
for about seven years. After the death of his wife 
he came to DeKalb County and lived with his sister 
Electa, who has long since passed away. For many 
years he was a deacon of the Christian Church and 
in politics a republican. 

Calvert Metz. Some of the best farms in Noble 
County are in Washington Township. One of them 
is the place of Calvert Metz in section 15. Mr. Metz 
has the reputation not only of owning a good farm 
but of being a good farmer, and a man of most sub- 
stantial character in the citizenship of his locality. 
He has acquired his present comfortable circum- 



42 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



stances as a result of self denying labors in youth 
and for a number of years after he attained manhood 
he remained at home and helped lift the burden of 
debt from the old homestead. 

He was born in the same section of Washington 
Township where he is now living on July 12, 1867, a 
son of Aaron and Mary (Prickett) Metz. His 
father was a native of Ohio. His mother was dis- 
tinguished as the first white child born in Washing- 
ton Township of Noble County. Her birth occurred 
in 1839, and the Pricketts were one of the first fam- 
ilies to locate in the woods of that section. Aaron 
Metz went with his parents to Whitley County, In- 
diana, grew up there, and learned the trade of sad- 
dler. He had a shop at South Whitley for several 
years, later one in Columbia City, and finally moved 
to a farm in Washington Township, but left the farm 
to conduct a saddlery and harness shop in Ligonier 
for seven years. He then returned to his farm, and 
two years later died. His widow survived him for 
a number of years and died on the old homestead in 
Washington Township. Both were active members 
of the Dunkard Church and Aaron Metz was a re- 
publican. Of their six children three are still living: 
William F. Metz, of Albion; Calvert; and Norvel E., 
a farmer in Washington Township. . 

Calvert Metz grew up on the home farm, and after 
his father's death he and his brothers were in part- 
nership in managing the land and helped pay off the 
obligations resting upon the homestead. He received 
his education in the common schools. After leavmg 
the home farm he came to his present place, which 
comprises two hundred and twenty acres, and is one 
of the high class farms of the township. Mr. Metz 
is also a stockholder in the Sparta State Bank at 
Cromwell. He is a republican and is affiliated with 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Ligonier. 

April 20, 1889, he married Amelia Gilbert. She 
was born in Washington Township, July 18, 1867, 
daughter of John and Margaret (Egner) Gilbert. 
She has spent practically all her life in Washington 
Township. Mr. and Mrs. Metz have two daughters, 
both married, and four granddaughters. Grace is 
the wife of Melvin Knapp and Velma is the wife of 
Claude Hardsock. 

Granville L. McClue represents some of the 
early settlers of Steuben County, has himself spent 
his life within the limits of that county, and has 
long been a successful farmer and stockraiser, 
though he now has a home in Angola where he 
spends the winter months. 

Mr. McClue was born in Steuben County Jan- 
uary 13, 1859, son of Thomas and Henrietta (Kemp) 
McClue, the former a native of New York and the 
latter of England. Henrietta Kemp when a girl 
came with her parents to the United States, and 
after some years of residence in New York the 
family came to Steuben County and settled in Mill- 
grove Township, where her parents spent the rest 
of their lives. Mr. McClue's paternal grandparents 
were John and Maria (Smith) McClue, pioneer 
settlers of Steuben Count.v. They lived at the vil- 
lage of Fremont. John McClue died in Pleasant 
Township. Thomas McClue was a farmer by occu- 
pation and died August 13, 1906, at the age of 
seventy-two. He was a republican and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife died 
August 29, i86g. the mother of two sons, Granville 
L. and John Willis. 

Granville L. McClue grew up on a farm in James- 
town Township, had a public school education, also 
attending high schoo'l at Fremont and Angola, and 
when he was twenty-two years old he bought his 
first farm in Jamestown Township. Later he traded 



for another farm, and at the present writing is 
owner of two complete and well arranged farms, 
aggregating 320 acres and constituting a compe- 
tence. Mr. McClue for many years was a success- 
ful breeder of Shorthorn cattle. In the spring of 
1915 he moved to Angola, where he owns a nice 
home on North Wayne Street. 

Politically Mr. McClue has been affiliated with 
the republican party and served as a member of the 
advisory board of his tjownship, also as a member 
of the county council. He was formerly president 
of the Bank of Fremont, which later became the 
First State Bank of Fremont. Recently he sold his 
stock in that institution. Mr. McClue married Flora 
E. Mallory, of Steuben County. She died July 16, 
1912, mother of three sons, Carl C, Howard L. and 
Emmet G. Emmet graduated from the Angola 
High School in 1919, at the age of seventeen. The 
son Carl married Miss Mary Rakestraw and has a 
son, Wayne Russell. Howard L. married Ethel 
Clark. On July 16, 1914, Mr. McClue married Mrs. 
Edith (Munger) Craig, widow of Fred Craig. She 
has a daughter, Florence E. Craig, now the wife of 
Dr. Clyde R. Clark of Goshen, Indiana, and is the 
mother of one child, Vincent. Mrs. McClue, who is 
a member of the Christian Church, is a daughter of 
one of the early settlers of Steuben County. 

George W. Cole. The last several years have 
found George W. Cole busily engaged in the man- 
agement of one of the valuable farms of Scott 
Township in Steuben County. A native of that 
county, he has been familiar since early childhood 
with all conditions affecting farm life and work, and 
is one of the practical, progressive men who are 
doing much to bring Steuben County to the front 
as an agricultural community. 

Mr. Cole, who represents an old family of North- 
east Indiana, was born in Scott Township, December 
28, 1870, a son of Nelson and Eliza (Phenecie) 
Cole. His father was born in Portage County, Ohio, 
May 4, 1838, and his mother in Bedford County, 
Pennsylvania, January 2-j, 1843. The paternal 
grandparents were Jacob V. and Sarah (Geer) Cole, 
who were early settlers in Steuben County, where 
they bought a large tract of land in Scott and 
Pleasant townships and spent the rest of their days 
in that community. Jacob Cole and wife had four- 
teen children, and the three still living are : Charles, 
of Scott Township, Sarah Rathburn and Marcia 
Eliza. 

Nelson Cole and wife were married in Steuben 
County, February 16, i860. On August g, 1862, 
Nelson Cole and his brother Samuel enlisted as 
LInion soldiers in Company H of the Seventy-fourth 
Indiana Infantry. Samuel was severely wounded at 
Jonesboro, Georgia, and died a few weeks after- 
ward. Nelson Cole saw a great deal of^ severe 
fighting, participating in the Atlanta campaign and 
the march to the sea. His cousin, George Geer, was 
killed in the battle of Chickamauga. After the war 
he returned to Steuben County and became a farmer 
and owned a large place of 210 acres in Scott Town- 
ship. He was later a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and in politics an ardent republican. 
He died at his home in Scott Township, January 4, 
igoi. His wife, who died December 29, 1904. came 
to Steuben County with her parents, George and 
Mary Ann Phenecie, who also settled in Scott 
Township. Her father later died in Kansas, and 
her mother a few years afterward in Steuben Coun- 
ty. Nelson Cole and wife had four sons : Samuel, 
who died in infancy, Sherman, Frank and George. 

George W. Cole grew up on the homestead farm, 
attended local schools for his education, and lived 



HISTORY. OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



43 



at home until iqoo. He then sold his possessions 
there and bought the farm he now owns in Scott 
Township, comi)rising 122 acres. This, under his 
management, is devoted to general farming and 
stock raising. Mr. Cole is a republican in politics 
and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows Lodge at Angola. 

March i, i8g8, he married Miss Jennie Harmon, 
of Steuben County. She died May 27, igii, the 
mother of two sons. Glen, born October 21, 1900, is 
a student in the .\ngola High School. Leon, born 
January 12, 1003, was educated in the district schools 
and the Angola High School, and died while a high 
school boy October 20, 1918. Mr. Cole married Lulu 
Maughcrman on December 24, 1915. 

Glenn W. Kf.slfr, who represents one of the old 
and prominent families of Noble County, has made 
good use of his opportunities and is conducting one 
of the best appointed dairy farms in the vicinity 
of Kendallville. His home is in Jefferson Town- 
ship, west of Kendallville. 

Mr. Kesler was born in Orange Township of 
Noble County, June -l, 1890, son of T. P. and Ella 
(Smith) Kesler. His father was a native of 
Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio, while his mother 
was born in Eaton, Ohio. Both were brought to 
Noble County while children by their respective 
parents, and they grew up and married there. They 
were the parents of four children. Alta, the oldest, 
graduated from the Eclectic Medical College at Cin- 
cinnati and is now the wife of Doctor Boram, and 
both are in practice at South Bend, Indiana. Theo 
P. is a farmer at Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Glenn W. 
is third in age. Ethel is the wife of Ed Belmont 
and lives at Price, Utah. 

Glenn W. Kesler grew up on a farm a mile east 
of Brimfield, Indiana, and besides the advantages 
afforded by the schools of that village attended Notre 
Dame .University at South Bend for four years. He 
is one of the young college men who are making 
notable strides in agriculture in Indiana today. He 
has a 600-acre farm, located partly in Jefferson and 
partly in Orange townships, and his main source of 
production is dairying. 

March 10, 1915^ Mr. Kesler married Mrs. Pearl 
Shanafelt. She was born in Fulton County, Indiana, 
and was educated in the local schools and in the 
schools of South Bend. By her first husband .she 
has a son, Elwood Shanafelt. Mr. and Mrs. Kesler 
have one son, Glenn \V., Jr. Mr. Kesler is affiliated 
with Lodge No. 1194 of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

Fr.\nk G. S.\lisbury, whose father was one of 
the settlers of 1836 in Steuben County, is one of the 
best known citizens, is present county commissioner, 
former state representative, and while many years 
of his life were devoted to farming, his chief atten- 
tion at present is given to the Shady Nook resort 
at Lake Gage, of which he is proprietor. 

Mr. Salisbury was born in Millgrove TownOiip 
November 28, 1854, a son of Chester D. and Julia 
(Collins) Salisbury. His great-grandfather, Heze- 
kiah Salisbury, at one time owned land included in 
the present site of the city of Brattleboro, Vermont. 
His grandfather, Edgar Salisbury, was in the War 
of 1812. Chester D. Salisbury was born in Jeffer- 
son Countj', New York, in ;8i7, and owing to the 
death of his father when he was eight years of age 
had to become a working member of the household 
and saw much hardship and few educational or other 
advantages except such as he could gain for him- 
self. He served an apprenticeship at the tanner's 
trade, but left that employment in 1836 to come to 



Indiana. On arriving in Steuben County he burned 
lime for two y>ars in Jamestown Township, then 
opened up and improved a farm, and after four years 
moved to another place in Millgrove Township. He 
reached Steuben County almost penniless and fifty 
years later was enjoying the income and comforts 
of one of the model farms of the county. He mar- 
ried in 1838 Julia Collins, a daughter of Barton Col- 
lins, distinguished as the first permanent settler in 
Jamestown Township. 

Frank G. Salisbury grew up on his father's farm, 
attended district schools, high school at Orland and 
the high school at Angola. He worked on the home 
place until he was twenty-three, and in August, 
1878, he went to the Nebraska frontier. He was in 
Nebraska until December, 1884. Being a man of 
good education he employed some of his earlier 
■ years in teaching school. He was thus employed 
for four years in Steuben County, two years in 
Branch County, Michigan, and while in Nebraska 
he taught for two years in Fillmore County. On 
returning to Indiana in December, 1884, Mr. Salis- 
bury bought a farm in Millgrove Township, joining 
the place where he was born. He lived there and 
gained most of his competence for twenty-eight 
years. On leaving the farm he moved to Orland, 
and in 1913 he moved to his present home in Shady 
Nook on Lake Gage in Millgrove Town -hip. As 
owner of the Shady Nook resort he has a valuable 
property consisting of a hotel and seven cottages, 
and it is one of the most attractive and best patron- 
ized resorts in Steuben County. 

February 26, 1879, Mr. Salisbury married Barbara 
E. Pocok, daughter of Levi and Barbara (Yanney) 
Pocock. Levi Pocock, who was born in 1817, in 
Maryland, grew up in Ohio, and in 1866 moved to 
LaGrange County, Indiana, and two years later to 
Steuben County, where he became a farmer m Mill- 
grove Township. Mr. and Mrs. Salisbury had four 
children : Earl married Jeanette Van Fossen, and 
their family consists of Esther, Martha, Wendell and 
Arthur. Geneva is the wife of Harry Fashbough 
and has three children, Barbara, Shirley and Keith. 
Irene is the wife of Carl Cary and has a son, Gor- 
don. W"inifrcd is now employed in the adjutant 
general's office at Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Salisbury for many years has been a prom- 
inent figure in the public life of his home township 
and county. He served as trustee of Millgrove 
Township from 1895 to 1900, from 1903 to 190S 
represented Steuben and LaGrange counties in the 
State Legislature, and in 1914 was elected county 
commissioner, taking office in January, 1916. He is 
a member of the Lodge and Chapter of Masons at 
Orland and the Knight Templar Commandery at 
Angola. 

Allen J, Greene was for thirty years one of the 
leading stock buyers of Steuben County, living at 
Orland, and was also a Union soldier during the 
Civil war. 

He was born in Ohio in 1847 and died at Orland 
November 17, 1000. His parents, Francis and Alceta 
(Mason) Greene, came to Steuben County about 
1856, settling in Fremont Township, where they lived 
on a farm the rest of their lives. The mother died 
June 27, 1895. Francis Greene was also a minister 
(jf the Baptist Church. 

.Mien J. Greene grew up in that county, had a 
public school education, and in 1863, at the age of 
sixteen, enlisted in the 12th Indiana Cavalry and 
served until the close of the war as a Union soldier. 
After the war for thirty years he was engaged in 
the live stock business. He was a republican and 
finally became a democrat. He was affiliated with 
the Masons and Odd Fellows at Orland. 



44 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST -INDIANA 



In 1870 he married Miss Mary Brown, a native 
of LaGrange County, and daughter of Frederick 
and Olive (Gambia) Brown, the former a native 
of Massachusetts and the latter of New York. Her 
father came to LaGrange County when a young 
man, and was married at Hamilton in Steuben 
County, his wife being a daughter of Joseph and 
Rachel (Smart) Gambia, who settled in Steuben 
County as early as 1843. Mrs. Greene's parents 
spent many years on a farm in Greenfield Township 
of LaGrange County, where, beginning with eighty 
acres, they gradually acquired 230 acres. Mrs. 
Greene now owns part of that old homestead. The 
father of Mrs. Greene died in 1886 and her mother 
in 1893. Besides Mrs. Greene, the oldest of their 
children, there were Florence, Frederick, who died 
at the age of nine months, and Charles. 

Fleming Newell Wilson. Of the old citizenship 
of Steuben County, no name for almost seventy 
years has carried with it, generation after genera- 
tion, more genuine respect and esteem than that of 
Wilson. While it has not been an unusually prolific 
family, it has been sturdy, independent and useful, 
and not without heroic qualities, for it has not been 
lacking in military sacrifices. A worthy representa- 
tive of this fine old family is found in Fleming 
Newell Wilson, and his large estate of 235 acres, 
lying in Jackson Township, includes ninety acres 
of the old original Wilson homestead secured in 
1850. 

Fleming Newell Wilson was born in a log cabin 
then the family home, standing on land he now 
owns, in Jackson Township, Steuben County, In- 
diana, February 20, 1864. His parents were Newell 
A. and Mary (Klink) Wilson, the former of whom 
was born near Plymouth, Ohio, and was a son of 
Fleming and Susannah Wilson, and the latter, also 
born in Ohio, was a daughter of Christian and Mary 
Klink. In 1850 Fleming Wilson and his family 
came from Ohio to Steuben County and secured 160 
acres of land in Jackson Township. They were 
quiet, frugal, industrious pioneers, and after the 
building of the log house Mr. Wilson cleared his 
land and gradually improved it, and here both he 
and wife died. Of their seven children but three 
reached maturity, namely : Newell A., Levi and 
John. 

Newell A. Wilson was thirteen years old when 
the family came to Indiana, and he completed his 
schooling in Steuben County, after which he taught 
school. In the course of time ninety acres of the 
home place became his property, and he took pride 
in its possession and never parted with it. His span 
of life was not extended into old age, for he was 
a martyr to his loyalty to country. He enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, was taken sick and came 
home on a furlough, but failed to recover, dying 
August 22, 1864. In 1873 his widow married George 
King, who died in 1905, leaving no children. To 
her first marriage two children were born : Frances 
R. and Fleming Newell. 

Frances R. Wilson was born in June, 1862, se- 
cured a good education and taught school for 
some years prior to her marriage to Guy Bodley, a 
son of Levi N. and Mary Jane Bodley, of Salem 
Township. Two children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Bodley, namely: Ethel and Glenn. Ethel mar- 
ried Clarence Houts, and they have three children : 
Lois, Lawrence and Mary. Glenn Bodley married 
Bonnie Avery, and they have two children : Harold 
and John. Guy Bodley and his wife live at Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan. 

Fleming Newell Wilson was reared on the home 
farm and first attended the country schools and 



later the high school at Angola, which was in 1883. 
He has devoted himself to agricultural pursuits and 
is considered one of the most up-to-date and suc- 
cessful farmers and stockraisers of Steuben County. 
For some years he was an extensive grower of 
sheep. Mr. Wilson has carried on his operations 
carefully and systematically, keeping well informed 
through the Grange and by other means, and has 
built up fortune as well as reputation. 

Mr. Wilson was married December 24, 1887, to 
Miss Myrtie L. Barr, who was born in Jackson 
Township, Steuben County, July 28, 1869, and is a 
daughter of Luke and Mary (Williams) Barr. Her 
paternal grandfather, Jared Barr, was born in 
Massachusetts in 1784, and married Lucretia Hazen, 
a native of Connecticut, a cousin of the father of 
General Hazen. They lived in Dover and Elyria, 
Ohio, until 1845, when they moved to Steuben Coun- 
ty, Indiana, and bought eighty acres of Lyman 
Clark in Jackson Township, and both died there. 
Jared Barr served in the War of 1812, and was 
captain of a company. He and wife belonged to the 
Disciples Church, in which he was a minister. 

Luke Barr, father of Mrs. Wilson, was born at 
Elyria, Ohio, September 22, 1830. He was an enter- 
prising citizen and well-to-do farmer, and for many 
years was widely known as a competent teacher of 
vocal music. In 1864 Mr. Barr married Mary Wil- 
liams, who was born at Manlius, New York, May 
IS, 1840, and died at Reid City, Michigan, June 3, 
1902. When eighteen years old she was graduated 
from Phipps Female Seminary, Albion, New York, 
and afterward taught school for twenty-five terms, 
for a while being principal of a school at Newville, 
Ohio. To Luke and Mary Barr the following chil- 
dren were born: Lena, Myrtie, Lillie, Charles and 
Guy. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have had children as 
follows: Erma, Alma B., Newell H., Lloyd, Loyal B. 
and Caroll. The eldest, Erma Wilson, was born 
April I, 1889, attended the public schools and com- 
pleted the high school course, subsequently pursuing 
the study of music in the Chicago Conservatory of 
Music, since when she has been teaching her art. 
Alma B. Wilson was born May 18, 1890, was gradu- 
ated from the Flint High School, after which she 
studied dramatic art, expression and music with 
noted instructors in Chicago. Newell H. Wilson 
was born February 2, i8q2, and died in March, 1898. 
Lloyd Wilson, who was born July 18, 1894, was 
graduated from the Angola High School, after 
which he spent several years at Purdue University. 
He is a successful breeder of Hereford cattle. He 
was subject to draft during the great war, was 
called May 21, 1918, was transferred from Colum- 
bus, Ohio, to Fort Snelling, Minnesota, then to Camp 
Taylor, Kentucky, and was taking officer's training 
when the armistice with Germany was signed, and 
he was discharged December i, 1918, when he re- 
turned home and resumed the pursuits of civil life. 
Loyal B. Wilson was born March 8, 1900, and was 
graduated from the Jefferson High School, Lafay- 
ette, Indiana, in 1919. Carroll Wilson, who was born 
July IS, 1902, at present is a student in the Jeiferson 
High School of Lafayette. Mr. Wilson is one of 
Steuben County's representative men. 

Charles A. Gatwood is one of the pleasant spoken 
citizens of Albion, a man of long experience in mer- 
cantile aft'airs, and is honored as the present trustee 
of Albion Township. 

He was born in that township of Noble County, 
December 9, 1873, son of Joseph and Mary (Rine- 
hart) Gatwood. His father was a native of Ohio 
and his mother of Pennsylvania. Both the Rine- 
hart and Gatwood families came to Indiana in early 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



days, the Rineharts settling near Ossian and the 
Gatwoods in Wells County, near Zanesville. After 
Joseph Gatwood was married he moved to LaGrange 
County, near Howe, worked at his trade as a car- 
penter there, and on moving to Albion continued 
business as a contractor and builder and was also 
in the bakery and grocery business for a time. Then 
for twenty-three years he was foreman of a gang 
of railway bridge carpenters. He and his wife are 
still living at .\lbion. For a brief time he was a 
soldier in the Civil war and is a member of the 
Grand Army Post. He is active in the United 
Brethren Church. There were eight children : 
Sarah, wife of J. N. Busz; John F., of Albion; 
Emma R., wife of A. B. Pinchon ; Charles A.; 
George W., of Areola, Indiana; Clyde D., deceased; 
Ted L., of Albion ; and Donald M., of Albion. 

Charles A. Gatwood grew up in .Mbion Township 
and attended the public schools of the village. After 
leaving school he worked as a clerk for ten years, 
then followed the barber trade in Mishawaka, In- 
diana, four years, and in the same city was em- 
ployed as a rubber boot maker four years. On re- 
turning to Albion he engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness with J. N. Busz, and after about four years 
bought out his partner and has been sole proprietor 
of one of the leading establishments of its kind in 
Noble County for the past eight or nine years. 

Mr. Gatwood married for his first wife Elizabeth 
Meiser, of Auburn, Indiana. She died of smallpox, 
leaving one son, Joseph L., who is now a student in 
high school. Mr. Gatwood married for his present 
wife Nettie M. Stewart, of Avilla. They have two 
daughters: Hilda Mae, born in 1906, and Lora L., 
born in igio, now students in the public schools. Mr. 
Gatwood and family are members of the United 
Brethren Church. He is affiliated with Albion 
Lodge No. 22i. Knights of Pythias, of which he 
is a past chancellor, and is also a member of the 
Maccabees and the Brotherhood of American Yeo- 
men. In politics he has been quite active as a re- 
publican, and his fellow citizens have been proud df 
the record he has made as trustee of the township. 

Cary M. Snowberger, representative of an old 
and well known family name in Steuben County, 
adopted as his profession dental surgery, and has 
made a conspicuous success of its practice at 
Hudson. 

Doctor Snowberger was born in Steuben County, 
May 15, 1875, a son of Robert and Marie (Lacey) 
Snowberger. The family history will be found on 
other pages. He acquired his early education in the 
district schools, spent a year and a half in the 
Angola Tri-State College, and in October, 1897, en- 
tered the Ohio College of Dental Surgery, where 
he was graduated in May, 1900. He at once located 
at Hudson and has been the leading dentist of that 
village for nearly twenty years and a man of un- 
usually fine qualifications professionally and as a 
citizen. 

While in college Doctor Snowberger became a 
charter member of Rho Chapter of the Psi Omega 
dental fraternity. He is a member in good standing 
of the DeKali) County, Northern Indiana. Fort 
Wayne District, Indiana State and American Dental 
associations and the Isaac Knapp Dental Coterie. In 
Masonry he is affiliated with the Lodge at Hudson, 
the Chapter at Ashley and the Council at .-Xngola. 
Doctor Snowberger married Reba B. Brown, a 
daughter of Jacob Brown, on March 27, 1901. 

Solomon Sexauer is widely known as the cattle 
king of Northern Indiana, and while now practically 
retired his operations as a farmer, land owner and 



stockman have covered a wide field in addition to 
the home farm where he has lived for more than 
half a century and which was developed from the 
stumps by the labors of himself and his father. 

Mr. Se.xauer was born in Erie County, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 28, 1842, a son of Andrew and Mary 
(Frey) Sexauer, both natives of Germany. His 
father was born in Baden, Germany, December 15, 
1804, and came to America in 1823. For a time 
he worked for a governor of New York State at 
Albany, and married while there. He then moved 
to Erie County, Pennsylvania, and in 1862 came to 
LaGrange County and settled on the farm where 
his son Solomon now resides. He owned 250 acres 
and spent his last days with his son Tobias "in Lima 
Township, where he died March 19, 1891. His wife 
had passed away July 27, 1890. They had a family 
of seven children, Solomon being the youngest. 

Solomon Sexauer on coming to LaGrange County 
at once set to work to clear up the forest on his 
father's land, and has lived in that locality ever 
since. To the old homestead he added until at 
present he owns more than 1,200 acres of land, all 
joining. His home farm is improved with splendid 
buildings, and here and elsewhere he has carried 
on extensive operations in feeding and raising cat- 
tle, also feeding sheep. He is a republican in poli- 
tics. 

On January 2, 1882, Mr. Sexauer married Miss 
Christina Kielkopf, who was born in Sturgis, Mich- 
igan, December 13, 1864, a daughter of Frederick 
and Christina Kielkopf, who came from Germany 
and lived in New York and Sturgis, Michigan, and 
later settled on a farm in Lima Township of La- 
Grange County, where her father died in 1909. Her 
mother is now living in Howe. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Sexauer were born four children : An infant daugh- 
ter that died soon after birth ; Edward, who married 
and has a daughter, Margaret ; Carrie and Albert, 
both at home with their parents. 

William T. Bowles, a resident of Angola, has 
had an active career as a farmer, contractor, lumber 
and coal merchant and in various official capacities 
in Steuben County. 

He was born at Mishawaka, Indiana, March 25, 
1864. His father, William Bowles, was twelve years 
old when he came with his father from England to 
New ^■ork, and soon afterward the family came 
West to Indiana. William Bowles after settling in 
Steuben County owned a small tract of land near 
Metz, where he lived until his death on March 8, 
191,3. He served several years as road supervisor. 
He was member of the tjnited Brethren Church. 
His wife, Elnora Reed, was born in 1847 and died 
February 2, 1915. Thev had a family of seven chil- 
dren, Charles, Mary, William T., Archie, Calvin, 
Gracie and George. The son Archie died in infancy. 

William T. Bowles acquired his education in the 
common schools of Steuben County, attended the 
Tri-State Normal College, and at the age of twenty- 
two began his practical career as a farmer. He 
farmed four years and then for six years did con- 
tracting work at Ashley. Going back on the farm, 
he later bought eighty acres of land and was busily 
engaged in producing crops and livestock until 1912. 
In that year he sold out and engaged in the lumber 
and coal business at Berlin. He continued his busi- 
ness career there until the Valley Line was dis- 
continued. He supervised the construction of all the 
buildings at Berlin. After leaving that community 
he moved to Angola, where he resides today. Mr. 
Bowles has served for years on the Advisory Board 
and in politics is a republican. 

March 25, 1886, he married Eveline Wisner, 



46 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



daughter of Stephen and Martha Wisner. She was 
born in Steuben County, June 6, 1866. They have 
a family of six children, named: Essie, wife of 
Dr. J. N. Blackman; Ford, who died at the age of 
thirteen ; Ralph, who married Hazel Tuttle ; Ethel, 
wife of Curtis Steller ; Ruth, wife of Paul Will- 
oby ; and Clark, a schoolboy fifteen years old. 

Edward C. Moore is a well-known agriculturist 
in Orange Township of Noble County, and after a 
considerable diversity of experience has settled down 
to farming the place where his mother was born 
and where he also first saw the light of day. This 
farm, comprising a valuable tract of land and well 
cultivated, is a mile and a quarter west of Rome 
City. 

Mr. Moore was born July 13, 1876, son of Wil- 
liam H. and Ursula J. (Hitchcock) Moore. His 
father was born in Elkhart Township of Noble 
County and his mother, as above stated, on the farm 
where Edward C. Moore now lives. The father is 
deceased and the mother is living in Rome City. 
Of their five children one died at the age of five 
years and the four still living are : Fred, a graduate 
of the Rome City High School, who served as coun- 
ty surveyor of Noble County fourteen years and is 
now well known in the abstract business ; D. W. 
Moore, connected with the great Atkins Saw Manu- 
facturing Company at Indianapolis; Frank H., a 
farmer in Orange Township ; and Edward C. 

Edward C. Moore grew up on the home farm and 
lived at home to the age of seventeen. He is a 
graduate of the Rome City grade schools. On leav- 
ing school he went to Indianapolis and spent several 
years in that city, following different lines of em- 
ployment. At the age of twenty he returned home, 
and on October 20, 1897, married Miss Nora M. 
Miller. Mrs. Moore was born at Turkey Creek in 
Steuben County, Indiana, and was educated in the 
district and high schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Moore lived 
a year at Wolcottville, and then moved to the old 
farm. Six children were born to their marriage, 
five still living. Harold is a graduate of the Rome 
City High School. Gertrude is also a graduate of 
high school. Karl and Louise are both in the first 
year of the high school, and Mildred, the youngest, 
is in the fourth grade of the public schools. Mrs. 
Moore and the four oldest children are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Moore is 
quite active in fraternal affairs and is present master 
of Rome City Lodge No. 451, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and is also worthy patron of the 
Eastern Star Chapter. In politics he is a republican. 

Ora W. Foster, whose people came to Steuben 
County about 1855, has made his efforts count to 
the building up of a good farm and a commendable 
degree of prosperity as a farmer in York Township, 
where he was born and where he has spent most of 
his life. 

Mr. Foster was born November 9, 1863, a son of 
James and Margaret A. (Hemry) Foster and a 
grandson of William Foster. William Foster was 
born in Ireland, June 10, 181 1, and was a boy when 
he came to the United States. August 24, 1836, 
while living in Richland County, Ohio, he married 
Margaret J. Bell, who was born in New York State. 
June 25, 1818. About 1855 they came from Ohio 
and settled in York Township, locating on a farm. 
About 1865 William Foster returned to Edgerton, 
Ohio, remained there about eight years and then 
came to York Township again and lived until his 
death on February 11, 1890. His death was the 
result of an accident. He found it convenient to 



cross a railroad trestle. He knew that the fast 
train was due but was informed that it had passed, 
and he started across and was overtaken and killed. 
His wife had died April 18, 1889. Their children 
were: Emily Ann, born September 19, 1838; James, 
born May 10, 1841 ; Elizabeth, born March 14, 1844; 
William, born June 17, 1847; Mary H., born Nov- 
ember 22, 1849; Margaret, born May 26, 1852; Frank, 
born April 22, 1855 ; and Olive May, born August 16, 
i860. 

James Foster, who was born at West Unity, Ohio, 
May 10, 1841, was about fourteen years old when 
his parents moved from Ohio to York Township. 
When a young man he was poisoned by sumac, and 
the infection resulted in a permanent injury to his 
right leg, so that he has lived physically handi- 
capped. He and his wife still live in York Town- 
ship. His wife, Maragret A. Hemry, was a daugh- 
ter of Abraham Hemry. They had six children : 
Ora W., George W., Eva M., wife of Frank Brooks, 
Ida M., wife of Fred Covell, Emily A., wife of Her- 
man Trowbridge, and Lilly B., wife of George 
Court. 

Ora W. Foster acquired his early education in 
the district schools of York Township and early 
took up the responsibilities of life and became self 
supporting. He worked as a farm hand for about 
fifteen years. On November 10, 1893, he married 
Zoe J. Smith, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca 
(Troxell) Smith. The spring after his marriage 
Mr. Foster began farming for himself on a rented 
place in York Township. Slowly his experience 
and industry brought him the necessary capital with 
which to buy land of his own. He made the pur- 
chase of his present farm in 1902. His first pur- 
chase was seventy-nine and a half acres, and since 
then he has bought twenty acres more. He has 
added to the buildings and has done more than 
make a good living out of his land. Mr. Foster is 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows at Fremont, and he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

His first wife died December 2, 1915, the mother 
of two children: Teresa D., wife of Witz Mason, 
and Thetis M., wife of Hershel J. Reichardt. Nov- 
ember 30, 1918, Mr. Foster married Mrs. Ida B. 
Barnes, widow of Albert Barnes. 

WiLLLiAM E. Murray. Though a native of Elk- 
hart County, William E. Murray has spent most of 
his life in LaGrange County, in his earlier years 
worked at the carpenter's trade, and gradually ac- 
quired and improved a fine farm, which he still 
owns and occupies in Van Buren Township. 

Mr. Murray was born in Elkhart County July 25, 
i85i, a son of James C. and Mary Ann (Smith) 
Murray. His parents came to Indiana from San- 
dusky, Ohio, settled in Elkhart County, and two 
weeks after the birth of their son William moved 
to Newbury Township of LaGrange County. They 
lived on the farm now occupied by their son Frank 
and owned 130 acres. The father died there De- 
cember 4, 1892, at the age of seventy-seven, while 
the mother passed away in 1889, at the age of sixty- 
seven. James Murray was a democrat in politics 
and his wife was affiliated with the Methodist 
Church. They had eleven children, three of whom 
died young, the others being named Jane, Amanda, 
Silas, Martha, David, Frank, William E. and Emma. 

William E. Murray grew up in Newbury Town- 
ship, was educated in the common schools and at 
the age of twenty-three began working at the car- 
penter's trade and for two years rented a house 
from Moses Miller. He made his living as a car- 
penter for eight years. He then bought twenty acres 
in the woods, where he now lives, put up some 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



47 



good buildings, and after clearing the land has gone 
steadily ahead as a farmer and today owns a good 
property of eighty acres. He is a democrat but 
has never aspired to public office. He and his wife 
are Methodists. 

December 24, 1884, Mr. Murray married Miss 
Lydia Neff. She was born in Newbury Township 
August 18, 1864, a daughter of Abram and Fannie 
(Plank) NefT. Her parents came to LaGrange 
County from Holmes County, Ohio, also lived for 
several years in Elkhart County, but in 1866 moved 
to Van Buren Township, where they spent the rest 
of their years. Mrs. Murray's father died in 1909, 
at the age of eighty, and her mother in 1904, aged 
seventy-two. In the Neff family were nine chil- 
dren, named John, Peter, Joseph, Barbara, Amos 
(deceased), Lydia, Emma, Mary and Amanda (de- 
ceased). 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray had five children. Carrie 
E. is the wife of Cliflford Si.xbuy ; Edward married 
Blanche Hayes and has a son, Raymond ; Willard 
married Ocie Davis, a daughter of Eugene Davis, 
of LaGrange County, and their family consists of 
Vera, Roscoe and Rachel. The two j'ounger chil- 
dren, both at home, are Harold E. and Hulda E., 
twins. 

Charles L. Cr.\nd.\ll. One of the families ear- 
liest to settle in Steuben County and carry on the 
work of development on Jackson Prairie was that 
of Crandall. Charles L. Crandall was an infant 
when his parents located there, and he has spent 
over seventy years in this county. He went from 
here to join the Union army as a boy soldier in the 
Civil war. Since then for half a century he has 
given his time and attention to farming, and is 
now living practically retired and in comfort. 

Mr. Crandall was born in Seneca County, New 
York, November 2, 184;, a son of Albert and Sarah 
(Beebe) Crandall, both natives of New York State, 
where they grew up and married. They came to 
Steuben County in 1846 and acquired forty acres of 
government land on Jackson Prairie. They lived 
there until after the war, when they sold and bought 
the eighty acres now owned by their son Charles in 
Pleasant Township. Albert Crandall died on this 
homestead in 1876, at the age of sixty-one. He was 
a republican and a Mason, and with his wife was 
active in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He had 
the following children : Charles L., Lamott, Loren, 
Randolph, Lavitis and Adella, the last four now 
deceased. 

Charles L. Crandall was educated in the Jackson 
Township schools, and lived at home on the farm 
until he was about eighteen years of age. On Janu- 
ary I, 1864, he enlisted in Company E of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-Ninth Indiana Infantry. He 
saw some of the very hard fighting in the center of 
the Confederacy during the last year and a half of 
the war, was in the Atlanta campaign, the battle of 
Wise's Forks and the great struggle at Franklin and 
Nashville. He was mustered out at Charlotte, North 
Carolina, August 29, 1865. After the war he re- 
turned home and following his father's death, 
bought the old homestead and has lived there ever 
since. He has made modern improvements, has 
raised great numbers of livestock, and a feature 
of his livestock business and general farming is a 
silo. Mr. Crandall is a republican, a member of the 
Masonic Order and the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

February 6, 1870, he married Miss Mary Stroh. 
She was born at Bucyrus, Ohio, and came to 
Steuben County with her parents, Hugh and Cath- 
erine (Fike) Stroh. Her father was a Dunkard 



preacher and spent his last years at Quincy, Michi- 
gan. Mr. and Mrs. Crandall had one son, Roscoe 
H. He was born June 20, 1876, was educated in the 
district schools and the Angola High School, taught 
two terms and was a farmer until his death. He 
married Maud N. Holder on .\pril 6, 1899, and she 
became the mother of three children : R. Clair, 
born March 30, 1900, who was educated in the public 
schools ; H. \\'ayne, born February 9, 1902, a stu- 
dent in the .■\iigola High School; and Richard Dale, 
born .^pril 20. 1906, who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Roscoe Crandall was married September 10, 1918, to 
Benjamin S. Farris, who is a mechanical engineer 
now in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mr. Crandall and his 
daughter-in-law are members of the Latter Day 
Saints Church, while Mrs. Crandall is affiliated with 
the Christian denomination. 

John J. Forker. There is no better known citi- 
zen of Noble County than John J. Forker. He has 
lived a long life of three score years and ten, and 
from youth to the present time "he has been active 
in varied affairs, is a man of diverse interests, and 
the diligent and successful prosecution of his own 
business has been accompanied by a worthy public 
spirit and participation in many affairs that affect 
the entire neighborhood. Mr. Forker has a large 
and prosperously conducted farm in Orange Town- 
ship, in section 36. 

He is one of the oldest living native citizens of 
Noble County, having been born in Wayne Town- 
ship, a half mile east of where he now lives, April 
30, 1848. His parents were Oliver and Elizabeth 
(Dingman) Forker. His father was born in New 
York State, June 24, 1825, son of John A. and Sybil 
(Bruer) Forker. From New York State the family 
moved to Ohio and later to Noble County, Indiana. 
The Forkers arrived in Noble County as early as 
1834 and the Dingmans in 1833. Oliver Forker and 
wife were married in Noble County and then located 
on a farm in Wayne Township, where they lived 
until his death in 1880. The mother passed away 
in 1893. Oliver Forker was an active member of the 
Free Will Baptist Church and a democrat in politics. 
There were ten children in the family, two of whom 
died young, and five are still living. The oldest is 
John J. Edmund lives at Red ford, Michigan. Ellen 
is the wife of Curtis M. Evans, of Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. George O. was a farmer in Steuben County 
and if now deceased. Perry is a farmer in Wayne 
Township. James is fireman at the Waterworks 
plant in Kendallville. 

John J. Forker grew up on the home farm and at- 
tended the district schools. On August 18, 1878, 
he married Miss Emma Strater. who was born in 
Orange Township, member of one of the old and 
well known families of Noble Comity. After his 
marriage Mr. Forker lived on his father's farm until 
1883. and then bought eighty acres included in his 
present farm. He had to earn his own modest capi- 
tal and has made his way by dependence upon his 
own energies and good judgment. He is now owner 
of a fine farm of 280 acres, and for many years has 
been one of the breeders of high grade livestock of 
all kinds. Mr. Forker was for twenty-five years 
well known among the farmers of Noble County as 
proprietor of a threshing outfit, and is one of the 
veterans in that industry. He is a director in the 
Lisbon Canning Factory at Lisbon. Indiana, and is 
adjuster for the Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company in Wayne, Orange, York, Elkhart and 
Perry townships. 

In politics Mr. Forker is a democrat. When he 
was chosen treasurer of Noble County in November, 
1906, it was by a majority of 100, and that was a 



48 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



high testimony to his effiicency and popularity since 
the county was normally republican by at least 400. 
He entered upon the duties of his office January i, 
1908, and served four full years. In 1883 Mr. Forker 
was one of the organizers of the Eastern Indiana 
Fair Association, and he has long been one of its 
directors and is superintendent of its horse depart- 
ment. Mr. Forker is an authority on many matters 
of local history. For many years he has kept a 
diary, and besides noting his own private affairs he 
has kept various other interests, including the daily 
temperature, and that is one of the few records of 
the kind to be found outside the regular Govern- 
ment weather stations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Forker have four children: John, 
a farmer in Jefferson Township, who married Edith 
Glosser ; Laloh. a graduate of the common schools 
and wife of Ernest Layman, of Allen Township; 
Merle, who runs the home farm and married Rosa 
Pankop ; and Fred, who is a farmer in Jefferson 
Township and married Mary Butler. 

C. A. Hickman, proprietor of the Locust Stock 
Farm near Wilmot in Washington Township of 
Noble County, has achieved success and a reputation 
as a farmer and breeder of horses and cattle after a 
youth and early manhood of comparative struggle 
and hard work. He obtained his start by working 
for others at the usually accepted wages of the time, 
and has gone steadily ahead year after year, solving 
the problems as they came up, and letting every ex- 
perience count to his good in the long run. 

Mr. Hickman was born in Thorn Creek Township 
of Whitley County, Indiana, August 7, 1858, son of 
Lewis J. and Martha (Jones) Hickman. His father 
was born in Hawkins County, Tennessee, and his 
mother in Shelby County, Ohio. They met and mar- 
ried in Whitley County, Indiana, and then settled on 
a farm in Thorn Creek Township, and from there 
moved to Greene Township of Noble County, In- 
diana, locating near Charter Oak Church, where they 
spent the rest of their days. They were very devout 
members and worshipers in the United Brethren 
Church. The father was a democrat. Of their nine 
children five are still living : C. A. ; Ann, wife of 
John Garland: Ellen, wife of Arthur Rose; Almira, 
wife of Donald Grabil! ; and Sarena, wife of John 
Benhamer. 

C. A. Hickman's boyhood recollections are chiefly 
centered around the old farm in Greene Township. 
He attended district school there, and at the age of 
nineteen left home to make his own way in the 
world. For several years he worked at monthly 
wages, and by the time he was ready to marry and 
settle he had saved $350. That was the capital that 
provided for his first adventure in home making. 

February 11, 1886, he married Eva TuHey, who was 
born in Elkhart County, Indiana, in 1867. For sev- 
eral years Mr. and Mrs. Hickman rented land in 
Noble and Elkhart counties, and finally they bought 
their present farm in Washington Township. The 
Locust Stock Farm comprises 140 acres, and has a 
more than local reputation on account of its fine 
Belgian horses and Shorthorn cattle. His stock of 
these strains are in great demand by buyers both in 
the locality and from a distance. 

Mr. Hickman is a democrat. He and his wife have 
three children : Sadie, a graduate of the common 
schools : Clarence, who is married and lives on a 
farm near his father; and Guy, a graduate of the 
common schools and still at home. 

James W. Porter is one of the widely known 
citizens of Richland Township in Steuben County, 



and is a son of a hard working and zealous pioneer 
minister in this section of Northeast Indiana. 

His father. Rev. Joseph Porter, was born in 
Medina County, Ohio, in 1820, and in 1867 married 
Huldah Buck, also a native of Medina County. 
Soon afterward they came to Steuben County, In- 
diana, locating in Richland Township, where Rev. 
Joseph Porter did much to build up the interests in 
the United Brethren Church. He preached in a 
number of places and continued in ministerial work 
for many years. After about two years he moved 
to the vicinity of Nevada Mills in Steuben County 
and lived there until after the death of his wife. 
He was three times married. His nine children 
were : William, two that died in infancy, Samuel 
D., Edmond R., Henry, John, Gurden and James W. 

James W. Porter was born in Wood County, Ohio, 
April 30, 1858, received his education in Steuben 
County, and learned the tinner's trade. He later 
took up farming, was a renter for several years in 
York Township, and in 1897 bought the farm he 
now owns adjoining the village of Metz and con- 
taining 108 acres. He is one of the prosperous 
citizens in that locality and has frequently been 
honored with stations of trust. He served as trus- 
tee of Richland Township six years and as assessor 
four years. He is a republican and he and his wife 
have been active in the United Brethren Church for 
over forty years. 

In 1878 Mr. Porter married Miss Sarah M. Snider, 
who was born in Defiance County, Ohio, November 
I, 1857, a son of Solomon and Delilah Snider. Her 
parents came to Richland Township of Steuben 
County about 1882, and her father died here in 1889 
and her mother in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Porter had 
five children: Minnie, wife of Lester Lechleid and 
the mother of two children, named Frances and 
Willis ; Myrtle, who is married and has four chil- 
dren, named Helen, Wilma, Roscoe and Leota ; 
Jennie, who died at the age of twenty-six ; Roscoe, 
who died at the age of eight years ; and Estelle, 
who died at the age of six. 

John Jacob Yunker is making a specialty of 
Jersey cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs on one of the 
good farms of Lima Township, LaGrange County. 
He is a man of good education, with the advantage 
of youth, enthusiasm and unlimited energy, and is 
regarded as one of the most progressive men in his 
locality. 

Mr. Yunker is an American in everything except 
birth and earliest infancy. He was born in Berne, 
Switzerland, December 23, 1882, and a few weeks 
later was brought by his parents, Rudolf and Rosetta 
(Lew) Yunker to this country. His parents were 
both Swiss, and Mr. Rudolf Yunker was educated 
in the common schools there and each year for 
twelve years took military training and drill. He 
was a stone mason by trade, and after his father's 
death he made his industry the chief support of 
his widowed mother. In 1883 he brought his fam- 
ily to America, arriving in New York City October 
iSth and coming directly to Howe, Indiana. Rudolf 
Yunker found work at his trade and always fol- 
lowed that occupation, though owning farms and 
living on them, allowing his sons to till the fields. 
He first bought twenty acres in Clay Township and 
cleared away enough of the timber to make a space 
on which to erect his log house. In course of time 
he had most of this tract under cultivation, and he 
and his family lived there until 1900, and after 
that spent three years in another part of Clay Town- 
ship, and in 1903 moved to the farm now occupied 
by John Jacob Yunker in Lima Township. Rudolf 
Yunker acquired eighty acres there and had the 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



farm improved with good buildings before he moved 
his family. The farm remained his home until 1913, 
when he rnoved to Howe and was living retired 
when he died June 19. igig. His wife died on the 
farm May 15, 1910. Rudolf Yunker and wife had 
eight children: Rudolf, Jr., Rosetta, John J., 
Ameil. Mary, Fred, Mabel, who died in April, 1918, 
and Howard. 

John Jacob Yunker is a graduate of the Howe 
High School and spent one summer in the Uni- 
versity of Indiana and another summer in the Nor- 
mal School at Ypsilanti, Michigan. He gave three 
3'ears of his early manhood to teaching, spending 
one year in the schools of Ontario and two years at 
Howe. Then for two years he was employed in the 
cold storage plant of BoUman Brothers, at Sturgis, 
Michigan, and since then has been farming either 
in Greenfield Township or over the line in ^Iichigan. 
He has been directing head of the old Yunker farm 
since 1913. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

:Mr. Yunker married Miss Mabel Kelly June 5, 
1907. She was born in LaGrange County, a daugh- 
ter of Daniel M. Kelly. Mr. and Mrs. Yunker have 
an interesting family of five children : Gwendolyn 
E., Helen R., Marjorie E., Robert John and Jean H. 

Daniel M. Kelly, father of Mrs. Yunker, was 
born in St, Joseph County. Michigan, August 27, 
1861, son of John M. and Asenath M. (Parham) 
Kelly, the former a native of Trumbull County, 
Ohio, and the latter of Greenfield Township, La- 
Grange County. John M. Kelly was a son of Wil- 
liam and Rebecca (Tiley) Kelly, who in 1854 moved 
from Ohio to St. Joseph County, Michigan, and 
later came to LaGrange County. William Kelly 
spent his life as a farmer and lived on one side or 
the other of the Michigan-Indiana state line until 
his death. John M. Kelly had a common school 
education, and taught school in LaGrange County 
and in Michigan. Most of his active life was spent 
as a farmer in Greenfield Township. His wife died 
in igoQ on the old farm where she was born. Her 
parents were Thomas and Susan (Kenyon) Par- 
ham, the former a native of England, who came to 
America when a young man. The Parhams were 
early settlers of LaGrange County. John M. Kelly 
after the death of his wife retired to Sturgis, Mich- 
igan, where he died. He owned 620 acres in Mich- 
igan and Indiana, and at one time was township 
trustee in Greenfield. His family of six children 
are all living, named Daniel M.. E. Morton, Susan 
R., Fidelia J., Mary E. and Albert M. 

Daniel M. Kelly was one year old when his 
parents moved to Greenfield Township, and he has 
spent his life there prosperously and effectively, de- 
voted to farming and stock feeding. He owns 360 
acres in LaGrange County and twenty acres across 
the Michigan line. He served on the township ad- 
visory board fourteen years. In 1884 Mr. Kelly 
married Miss Eliza M. Milliman, who was born in 
Branch County, Michigan, a daughter of Jerome B. 
Milliman. Thev have five children : Mabel A., Eva 
I., Edith L., Robert J. and Ralph. 

Shirley D. Fee, a grandson of the first settler in 
Otsego Township of Steuben County, has been a 
diligent and public-spirited factor in that commun- 
ity for many years, was formerly a farmer and is 
now proprietor of the Fee mills at Metz. 

His grandfather, John Fee, was born in Southern 
Ohio, October 13, 1810, a son of William Fee, who 
about 18.W moved to Williams County, Ohio. John 
Fee in 1833 married Mary A. B. Houlton, who was 
born in Highland County, Ohio, in 181 1, daughter of 
Samuel Houlton, one of the first settlers of Chilli- 



cothe. The Houlton family were conspicuous for 
their pioneer activities in DeKalb County, Indiana. 
In 1835 John Fee came to Otsego Township, and 
his was the first white family to make its home 
there. He acquired 120 acres in section 32, and 
was well fitted for his pioneer environment, being a 
man of great energy and industry. In time he be- 
came one of the largest land owners in the county, 
owning about 1,500 acres. His lands also extended 
into DeKalb County, and comprised several farms. 
John Fee died April 2, 1873. He was the father of 
nine children. 

Of these Frank Fee was born in Otsego Township 
in 1844, attended the pioneer schools of Steuben 
County, and had much of the enterprise and ability 
of his father. At the time of his death he owned 
413 acres of land. He was a republican in politics. 
He married in Steuben County, Setta Gilbert, a 
native of that county. They were the parents of 
twelve children, nine of whom reached mature 
years: Myrtle, Shirley, Flora, John, Asa (who is 
now deceased), Clarence, Earl, Lloyd and Aldah. 

Shirley D. Fee was born in Otsego Township in 
August, 1879. He grew up on his father's farm and 
had a public school education. Becoming familiar 
with farming as a boy, he followed it as a regular 
occupation for many years, and in 1907 bought a 
place of sixty-four acres in Otsego Township. On 
January i, 1919, he left the farm to take the active 
management of the Metz Mills, a property which he 
owns and which does a large business under his 
management. Mr. Fee is a republican and is affili- 
ated with the Knights of Pythias Lodge. 

In 1901 he married Miss Alma Irene Gurtner, 
daughter of Henry Gurtner of Hamilton and mem- 
ber of a well-known familv of Steuben County. 
They have one son, Walter Ray, born October 28, 
1902, now a junior in the Metz High School. 

James W. Hunt, a farmer and livestock breeder 
in Washington Township of Noble County, is one of 
the interesting men of Northeastern Indiana, is 
widely traveled and variously experienced, and has 
seen a great deal of the world since his boyhood 
days in Indiana. 

He was born in Etna Township of Whitley Coun- 
ty, September 3, 1867, son of Franklin and Martha 
J. (Long) Hunt. His grandfather. Smith Hunt, was 
a prominent resident of Wayne County, Indiana, 
and in the early days acquired vast tracts of Gov- 
ernment land in Whitley, Noble and Kosciusko 
counties. He never lived on this land, but kept his 
residence at Richmond, where he died. Franklin 
Hunt was born in Wayne County, February 22, 
1828, and as a young man just turned of age in 
1849 he left home and on horseback made the over- 
land trip to California. He was in the Golden West 
for two years, and on returning to Indiana settled 
in Whitley County, where he spent the rest of his 
days as a successful farmer. His wife, Martha J. 
Long, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, July 10, 1834, 
and is still living at the venerable age of eighty-four. 
Her father, Thomas Long, came to Indiana in 1847, 
locating in Whitley County. 

James W. Hunt contented himself with the en- 
vironment of the homestead farm in Etna Town- 
ship until after he had attained the age of twentv- 
one. He then started out in the world, and in the 
course of his travels reached the far Orient in 
Korea, where he was connected with a gold mining 
company for a period of twelve years. Then after 
other travels and experiences he returned to Indiana 
and for a number of years has been giving all his 
time and energies to his farm of 160 acres in Wash- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



ington Township of Noble County. Mr. Hunt has 
never married. He is affiliated with Cromwell 
Lodge No. 705, Free and Accepted Masons, is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, and is 
affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks at Ligonier and in politics is a republican. 

Frank Gettings. The Gettings family has played 
a part of unusual industry and enterprise in several 
localities of Northeast Indiana. Frank Gettings of 
this family was born in Noble County, spent part of 
his life in LaGrange County, and is now a promi- 
nent resident of Hamilton in Otsego Township of 
Steuben County. 

He was born in Noble County, January 17, 1859, 
son of Adam and Lovina (Repine) Gettings. His 
father was an early settler in Noble County, first 
locating about two miles south of Kendallville and 
soon afterward buying a farm southwest of that 
city. He also lived in Kendallville, and was pro- 
prietor of the Air Line Hotel and entertained the 
traveling public for a number of years. He also 
conducted a livery and sales stable and became 
widely known as a dealer in horses. Finally selling 
his Kendallville interests he removed to LaGrange 
County, buying 160 acres in Milford Township. 
Later he bought forty acres where his son, James, 
now lives in that county, and on that place he died 
in 1888, when about sixty-seven years of age. His 
widow survived him until January 24, 1917, and was 
ninety-two years old at the time of her death. The 
father was a democrat, a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and his wife was a Method- 
ist. Their children were Frank, James and Alma, 
the daughter being now deceased. By a previous 
marriage Adam Gettings had three children : 
Thomas, William and Ella. Of these only the 
daughter survives. 

Frank Gettings lived in Kendallville until he was 
twelve years old and while there attended the vil- 
lage schools. He also attended public school at 
Milford and for one term was in the college at 
Angola. His first farm comprised 40 acres in 
LaGrange County, but he sold that and bought 120 
acres and in 1909 moved to Steuben County and 
bought 160 acres in Otsego Township. This farm 
is now under the active management of his son, 
Clair. He also acquired ten acres near the village 
of Metz, and that is his home and he uses the land 
and its facilities to conduct a dairy. He has been 
an extensive cattle feeder and very successful in 
handling all kinds of livestock. 

Mr. Gettings is a democrat in politics. He mar- 
ried Miss Elsie Wright, daughter of Elbridge and 
Martha Wright, of Steuben County. They have 
two children : Zoa, at home, and Clair, who is 
manager of the farm. Clair married Elsie Snyder, 
and has two children, Esther May and Louise. 

Jesse W. Camp, one of the active and pushing 
men in the community of Smithfield Township, De- 
Kalb County, has spent his active career as a farmer, 
is prominent in fraternal work, and has been hon- 
ored by his fellow citizens with the office of trustee 
of Smithfield Township, of which he is the incum- 
bent today. 

He was born on the farm where he now lives 
near Ashley Alay 10, 1877, a son of Aaron W. and 
Amanda E. (Husselman) Camp. His father was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, May 17, 1847. His 
mother was born in Fairfield Township of DeKalb 
County and is still living, an active member of the 
Methodist Church. Aaron W. Camp was an active 
member and at one time chancellor of the Knights 
of Pythias Lodge and was its chancellor when his 
son took the preliminary work. He was a democrat 



and was serving as a member of the county council 
when he died. He and his wife had five children: 
Jesse W. ; Maude B., wife of Frank Duncan, living 
near Olivet, Michigan; Eva H., wife of Forest Mil- 
ler of Ashley; Mabel C, who married H. T. Judson 
of Auburn, Indiana; and Ethel V., wife of Boyd 
Kirkland of Kenton, Ohio. 

Jesse W. Camp, only son of his parents, grew 
up on the home farm, and since early manhood has 
been operating it. He has acquired other business 
interests and is a stockholder and director of the 
Commercial Bank of Ashley. 

Mr. Camp married for his first wife Edna Hart- 
man. After her death he married Catherine Dono- 
van on September 30, 1917. She was born in Wa- 
bash County, Indiana, December 24, 1874, and her 
first husband was Thomas W. Millard. Mrs. Camp 
has a son, Warren J., who was born September 17, 
1898, and is a graduate of the common schools. 
During the war he was in the aviation repair de- 
partment at Dallas, Texas, and at this writing is 
still a Government employe. Mrs. Camp is an active 
member of the Church of Christ. Mr. Camp is 
past chancellor of Ashley Lodge No. 394, Knights 
of Pj'thias, and he and his wife are members of 
the Pythian Sisters. Mrs. Camp is a past worthy 
matron of the Eastern Star and also a past noble 
grand of the Rebekalis. Mr. Camp is a democrat in 
politics and on that ticket was elected to his present 
office as township trustee. 

James Eric Gifford has been numbered among 
the leading farmers of Steuben County for a number 
of years, is a native of Northeast Indiana, and he 
took up farming after a number of years spent in 
mechanical trades. 

Mr. Gifford was born in Scott Township, Septem- 
ber 20, 1859, a son of Job and Hannah (Trobridge) 
Gifford. His father was born in Oswego County, 
New York, and his mother in Vermont. They were 
early settlers in LaGrange Count3', Indiana, and 
from there moved to Scott Township of Steuben 
County, buying a farm near the Gifford schoolhouse. 
Job Gifford died here in 1864 and his wife in 1872. 
Their children were: Lois, wife of Albert 
Wheaton ; Lizzie, wife of Henry Arnold ; Ida, who 
married Ed Hauselman ; Freeman and Fremont, 
twins ; Agnes ; and James Eric. 

James Eric Gifford grew up on his father's farm 
and attended Gifford schoolhouse. He left the farm 
in early life to go to work as a machinist, and was 
employed in machine shops for about fifteen years, 
and since that time has found both profit and pleas- 
ure in farming. He is a republican, and also a 
Mason and Odd Fellow. 

In June, 1879, he married Ella Walgemuth. Their 
three children, all living, are Carrie, Eva and Graf- 
ton. Mr. Gifford married for his second wife Mrs. 
Sarah Jane (Dygert) Nisonger. She was born in 
Scott Township, January 6, 1858, a daughter of John 
and Caroline Dygert, representing an old family of 
this district. Mrs. Gifford married for her first hus- 
band on November 17, 1878, Jackson Nisonger. He 
was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, February 3, 
1855, son of Christopher and Barbara (Arnold) 
Nisonger. His parents were early settlers in 
Steuben County, and located the land that is now in- 
cluded in the fine home of Mr, and Mrs. Gifford. 
They traded land in Kosciusko County for this place, 
and developed a farm of 107 acres. Mr. Nisonger 
died in 1874 and his widow is now living in Colorado 
at the age of eighty-seven. In the Nisonger family 
were five children, Jennie, Jackson, Jacob, Dora and 
Alice. Jackson Nisonger grew up on the home farm 
in Steuben County, had an education in the public 
schools, and was a successful agriculturist until his 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



51 



death. He was a democrat in politics. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nisonger had two children, Merle and Caro- 
line. 

Thomas A. Anderson is one of the oldest resi- 
dents of Swan Township, Noble County, his home 
having been in that locality for over sixty years. 
His life has been spent quietly but profitably as a 
farmer, and he still gives his active supervision to 
his farm of seventy acres lying adjacent to the 
Hopewell Church. 

Mr. Anderson was born in Pennsylvania, March 
21. 1847, son of Thomas A. and Jane (Cooley) An- 
derson, both natives of Pennsylvania. In 1854 the 
Anderson family came to Indiana and located in 
Swan Township of Noble County, where the parents 
spent the rest of their lives. The father was an 
active churchman and served as an elder in the Swan 
Presbyterian Church. He was a republican. Of 
eight children three are still living : Mary J., wife 
of Frank Mills; Sarah, widow of James McCoy; 
and Thomas A. 

Thomas A. Anderson was seven years old when 
his parents came to Indiana, and he grew up in a 
rather frontier community, procuring his education 
in a log school house. For fully half a century he 
has been identified with the business of farming. 

May 21, 1874, he married Miss Mary E. Moore, 
daughter of Rev. J. P. Moore. To their marriage 
were born three children, only one of whom is now 
living, Joseph M. Joseph M. was born August 25, 
1882, and married Miss Nora E. Weimer, daughter 
of Samuel Weimer. Mr. Anderson is an active 
member of the Presbyterian Church and has served 
as deacon. He is a republican. 

Fr.\nk Strock. No small part of the business 
enterprise of Hudson moves to the accompaniment 
of Frank Strock, who is banker, elevator man, and 
both a producer and a dealer, well and favorably 
known in that communit5'. 

Mr. Strock was born in Wayne County, Ohio, 
August 28, 1881. His grandparents were George 
and Mary (Baumgardiner) Strock. His father, 
Daniel Strock, who was born in Wayne County in 
June, 1852, had a farm there but did a large business 
in the buying and shipping of hav and potatoes, 
and was owner of the elevator at Hud.son, Indiana. 
He died in November, igog. He married Addie 
Troutman, who was born in Wayne County, a 
daughter of Philip and Pleasant Troutman. She 
is still living in Wayne County. Her children were 
six in number : Frank, Jay P., Earl Wayne, Mary, 
Fannie and Florence. 

Frank Strock acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Wayne County, and when a young 
man gained much business experience working with 
his father in the handling of hay and potatoes. He 
came to Hudson in August, igo3, to take the man- 
agement of the Hudson elevator, which was then 
owned by his father. He has been continuously in 
that business ever since, and since about 1908 has 
been owner of the establishment. Hudson is an 
important onion market, and Mr. Strock has had 
much to do with stimulating that production, grow- 
ing onions himself and also buying them. He is 
president of the Farmers State Bank of Hudson 
and is a director and stockholder of the Auburn 
Hardware Company at Auburn. Mr. Strock is 
affiliated with the Masonic Lodge at Hudson, also 
the Royal Arch Chapter, the Commandery at An- 
gola and the Scottish Rite Consistory at Fort Wayne 
and the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of 
the Eastern Star. 

March 20, igo6, he married Ada Ketclicm. a daugh- 



ter of Joseph and Frances Ketchem. They have 
two children. Paul Wayne and Carl A. 

C.VRL J. Sw.\NK, though not yet thirty years of 
age, is one of the independent business men of 
Northeast Indiana, and is active head of the firm 
Swank & Company, proprietors of two first class 
furniture and undertaking establishments at Hudson 
and Ashley. 

Mr. Swank, who is a graduate embalmer and a 
man whose ability is greatly appreciated in his pro- 
fession, was born near Ligonier in Noble County, 
Indiana, September 12, i8go, a son of Jerome and 
Almira (Retfrow) Swank. His father was born 
near Ligonier, and spent his active life on a farm 
there. He died in i8g3. The mother is now living 
at Hudson, Indiana. They were married in Noble 
County and both were active members of the Meth- 
odist Church. In the family were two sons and one 
daughter, Grover, a barber at South Milford, In- 
diana; Carl J.; and Gertrude, wife of William Mar- 
shall of Noble County. 

Carl J. Swank lived on the home farm until he 
was sixteen years of age. He attended the Topeka 
High School, and for four years followed the trade 
of barber. In igio he graduated from the Clark 
Embalming School at Cincinnati and at once re- 
turned to Hudson, where he followed his profession 
for four years. He then bought out the business 
of which he is proprietor. He is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Hudson and 
also the Knights of Pythias and in politics is a demo- 
crat. He and his wife are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church. 

He married Esther M. Bidwell, whose former 
home was near Rome City in Noble County. Their 
two children are June Adel, born in ign, and Wen- 
dall, born in 1918. 

Francis H. Ramsav has had a long and varied 
experience in business affairs in several states, is 
widely known in Steuben County, lives at Angola, 
and owns and operates a fine dairy farm near that 
city. He has been a manufacturer, and farmer, and 
in various lines of business experience. 

Mr. Ramsay w^as born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 
March 22, 1848. He came to the United States in 
■i8n8, at the age of twenty, first locating in New 
\ork State, where he remained about nine months 
then moved to Canada, and in 1S74 to Michigan. He 
was at Mount Clemens for several vears and in 1883 
moved to Hillsdale, and in 1889 came to Angola, 
Indiana. Here he was in the cooperage business, 
employing as many as eight men, and he continued 
that industry until igo6. Since then he has been 
'.ngaged in the dairy business, owning a well 
equipped farm adjoining the corporation limits of 
Angola and other property in the city. He has been 
very successful in his affairs since coming to 
Sleuben County. 

Mr. Ramsay is a republican in politics, and is a 
justice of the peace, an office he has filled capably 
for thirteen years. For many vears he has been a 
deep student of Masonry, is thoroughlv impressed 
with its doctrines, and is proud of the fact that most 
of his sons are also members of the same order 
and some of them have attained the highest degrees 
Mr. Ramsay retains his affiliation in Hillsdale Lodge 
of Masons, Angola Chapter No. 58, Royal Arch 
Masons, and Angola Commandery No. 45, Knights 
Templar. He is a member of the Christian Science 
faith. 

In 1867. in Scotland, he married Miss Armanella 
Hazlett. Mr. Ramsay was divorced from his first 
wife and in 1903 married Elizabeth Wolfe, of 
Angola. His first wife died in lgi6. The present 



52 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Mrs. Ramsay is a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. Mr. Ramsay by his first marriage had 
eight children. Robert and Sarah Jane were twins 
and Robert is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite 
Mason and Shriner and a farmer in Steuben County. 
Francis James, the second son, died in 1896. An- 
drew John, a farmer in Pleasant Township, is a 
member of the Masonic Order. Samuel W. is also 
a Mason and lives in Colorado. Calvin, a well- 
known attorney at Angola, has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite Masonry and is 
also grand high priest. Lillie lives in Pleasant 
Township. David V. joined the Engineering Corps 
of the National army in October, 1917, was sent 
overseas about Christmas of that year and saw a 
great deal of active service for nearly seventeen 
months, participating in some of the chief cam- 
paigns, and while in the front lines was gassed and 
wounded. He returned home on March 10, 1919, 
and is still suffering from the effects of the gas. 

Albert D. Sawyer. The Sawyer family have 
been residents of Noble County more than eighty 
years. It is appropriate that a representative of 
this pioneer family should now hold the office of 
sheriff, Albert D. Sawyer having been elected and 
re-elected to that important office. Mr. Sawyer has 
spent most of his life as a practical farmer. 

He was born on the old Sawyer homestead in 
Wayne Township of this county, January 28, 1859, 
son of Jackson and Margaret (Lavering) Sawyer. 
Jackson Sawyer was born in Ohio, son of John and 
Charlotte (P'earl) Sawyer. Charlotte Pearl Saw- 
yer lived to the advanced age of ninety-two. John 
Sawyer brought his family to Indiana in 1836 and 
entered a tract of Government land in Wayne 
Township, this old homestead being now owned by 
his grandson Albert. John Sawyer died in the fall 
of 1837, having had little opportunity to improve 
his land. His widow proved herself a noble pioneer 
woman, rearing her family of ten children, and re- 
maining faithful to the memory of her first husband 
all the rest of her life. All her ten children are now 
deceased. 

The old homestead eventually became the property 
of Jackson Sawyer, who lived there and prospered 
as a farmer. He was the father of seven children, 
four of whom are still living: Mervin D., of Ken- 
dallville, Indiana; Agnes, wife of Arthur Scott, of 
Defiance, Ohio; Harvey, of Wolcottville, Indiana; 
and Albert D. 

Albert D. Sawyer grew up on the old farm, at- 
tended the common schools there, and in 1882 mar- 
ried Miss Charlotte Ream. They have a family of 
four sons and one daughter. Orrie and Ottie are 
twins, both graduates of the common school. Orrie 
is now deputy sheriff of the county under his father 
and is married and has one child. Ottie is a farmer 
east of Kendallville and has three children. Guy is 
farming his father's place. Another son, Harold, is 
now with the United States army. The daughter, 
Bertha, married Chester Bowser and has one daugh- 
ter. 

Mr. Sawyer is a member of the Loyal Americans. 
He was elected sheriff the first time by 125 majority, 
and the second time by 180 votes. He is a democrat 
in politics. His farm, now operated by his son, 
comprises 216 acres in Wayne Township, and he 
still retains an interest in the livestock. 

John H. Oberlin. The Oberlins are a family 
that have been rather numerous and prominent in 
DeKalb County for over seventy years. Mr. John 
H. Oberlin, who was born in DeKalb County, has 
spent the greater part of his active career in Steuben 



County, and beginning life as a renter followed 
farming successively and aggressively for many 
years and is now enjoying a well earned retirement 
at Hamilton. 

He was born in Franklin Township of DeKalb 
County May i, 1854, son of John and Rachel (Duck) 
Oberlin. His father settled in DeKalb County in 
pioneer times, developing a tract of wild land, and 
later moved to Butler, where he exercised his trade 
as a tanner by establishing a tannery. He died in 
1863. In religion he was a Methodist. He was the 
father of a large family of children, named William, 
Fred, Philip, Hiram, Elijah, Benjamin, Joseph, 
Daniel, Orlando, Mary, Lucinda, Sarah, Hannah 
and John H. 

John H. Oberlin, who was only nine years old 
when his father died, attended public school in 
Otsego Township, also a school at Butler, and as 
he inherited nothing except good character and a 
tendency to industry, he started out as a young man 
to make his own way in the world. He worked as 
a farm hand, and on January 23, 1881, when still 
possessed of little capital, he married Minerva J. 
Wilson, daughter of Alexander and Mary J. Wilson. 
They established their first home on a rented farm 
in Otsego Township, lived there three years, then 
in Richland Township four years, and in 1888 Mr. 
Oberlin took possession of the County Farm and 
lived there three years. In 1891. having in ten years 
acquired some capital, he bought eighty acres in 
Otsego Township and followed an uninterrupted 
career of industry and productive labor on that 
farm for twenty-five years. In the spring of 1916 
he left the farm and has since lived in Hamilton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oberlin became the parents of four 
children : Edgar, who married Grace Hunt ; Edna 
May, wife of Benjamin Taylor; Hiram W., who 
married Hertha Weaver; and Ethel, wife of Fred 
Haines. The mother of these children died Nov- 
ember 20, 1913. In February, 1916, he married 
Rhoda (Martin) Houlton, daughter of Henry and 
Catherine (Davis) Martin. Her father was a sol- 
dier in the Civil war. Rhoda Martin was first mar- 
ried to Lewis Houlton, of Franklin Township, 
DeKalb County. The family are conspicuous as 
being the very first family to settle in DeKalb 
County, locating there in 1831. A number of refer- 
ences are found to them in the pages of this pub- 
lication. Mrs. Oberlin has in her possession the 
first deed given for land in DeKalb County. It was 
written on parchment and is signed by Andrew 
Jackson, President of the United States. Mrs. 
Oberlin by her marriage to Lewis Houlton had 
three children : Vern, who married Rosa Mills ; 
Firm ; and Leland, who married Jessie Hathaway. 
Mrs. Oberlin is a member of the Christian Church 
and her husband is a Methodist. He is affiliated 
with the Masonic Lodge and Knights of Pythias. 
From IQ08 to 1918 he served as assessor of Otsego 
Township. 

Harry W. Simmons is one of the practical and 
enterprising younger men of the farming com- 
munity of Perry Township who have gone in for 
the more progressive phases in agriculture and 
stock husbandry, including registered horses and 
cattle, and the results of his enterprise are thor- 
oughly apparent, since he has more than a local 
reputation not only for his success but for his en- 
viable qualifications of citizenship. 

He was born in Perry Township August 28, 1877, 
a son of Adam and Elizabeth (Klick) Simmons, of 
a well known family in Noble County. His father 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1829. Harry W. Sim- 
mons left school at the age of fourteen, and since 
then has been practically dependent on his own 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



53 



efforts to promote him to success in affairs. For 
several years he worked at wages of eight dollars 
a month. In fact he labored and gave his abilities 
to others until he was about thirty-two years of age. 
In that way he got his start, in the shape of a modest 
capital, which he used to establish himself on an 
independent footing. 

In igo2 he married Ethel M. Bowser, who was 
born in York Township, Noble County, a daughter 
of O. L. and Isabel (Calbeck) Bowser, who are 
now living in Ligonier. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Simmons moved to a farm in Perry Town- 
ship, and have lived in that locality ever since. The 
farm where he now lives comprises i68 acres, and 
he owns a half interest in all the livestock on the 
farm. He also owns a half interest in another 
place of no acres in Perry Township, and has re- 
cently purchased a tract of i6o acres which joins 
the farm on which he resides. He is a breeder of 
Shorthorn cattle, and his herd is headed by one of 
the best males of the type in Noble County, named 
"Filigree Lad." He also has four registered cows 
of the same type. He has several registered 
Percheron horses and other good graded live stock. 
Mr. Simmons is a stockholder in the Farmers Co- 
operative Elevator Company at Ligonier. 

He and his wife are the parents of three sons : 
Harold, a graduate of the common schools; Kermit, 
who was born in igio; and Thad, born in 1917. 
The family are members of the Christian Church 
at Ligonier, and Mr. Simmons affiliates with the 
democratic party. 

William Henry Keyes, a resident of Steuben 
County for over seventy years, has had a career dis- 
tinguished by many notable services and experiences. 
He was a brave and gallant soldier of the Union 
during the Civil war, served two terms as sheriff, 
and was one of the most efficient officers Steuben 
County ever had, and has been variously identified 
with farming, business, religious and social matters. 
He is now living retired in the village of Hamilton. 
Mr. Keyes was born in Kno-x County, Ohio, De- 
cember 12, 1841, a son of Tolman and Mary (Rich- 
ards) Keyes. His father was a native of Vermont 
and his mother of Connecticut, and they were mar- 
ried in Vermont shortly afterward moving to Ohio. 
Tolman Keyes served as a soldier in the War of 
1S12. In 1844 this family came to Steuben County 
and settled in Richland Township, where they 
bought eighty acres of land from Mr. Gordon, who 
had acquired it direct from the government. Mary 
Keyes died at Alvarado in the spring of 1863, at 
the age of sixty-three, while the father lived to the 
age of eighty-four, dying at Orland in Steuben 
County. He was a republican and he and his wife 
were active in the Methodist Church. Their chil- 
dren were David, Hiram, Augustus, Charles, Wil- 
liam H., Harvey H., Elizabeth, Phoebe and Salinda. 
The only survivor now is William H. Keyes. 

The latter was about three years old when his par- 
ents came to Steuben County, and he grew up on the 
homestead farm in Richland Township and attended 
the local schools. In August, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company A of the Twenty-Ninth Indiana Infantry, 
under Col. John F. Miller, who later became United 
States senator from California. His first battle was 
that of Pittsburg Landing. Soon afterward he was 
sent home on a furlough, but rejoined his regiment 
in time to participate in the battles of Liberty Gap 
and Chickamauga. The regiment was then assigned 
to post duty at Chattanooga and Mr. Keyes for a 
time was in General Stanley's headquarters, and 
then detailed to the postal department. He had 
charge of the mail sent to Sherman after the cap- 



ture of Atlanta, and continued on duty until his 
discharge early in November, 1864. Early in 1865 he 
again enlisted as a recruit, and was with Company 
B of the Fifty-Sixth Pennsylvania Infantry until 
the close of the war. Altogether he served three 
years and five months. Mr. Keyes saw much of the 
country while a soldier and his travels have since 
taken him over most of the United States. He has 
been in twenty-nine states, from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, and from St. Cloud, Minnesota, to Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

From his savings as a soldier Mr. Keyes bought 
forty acres of land in Richland Township, and was 
one of the hard working farmers in that locality 
until 1878, when he was elected sheriff. He then 
sold his farm. Prior to his election as sheriff he had 
been identified with the organization known as the 
Regulators at Metz, and his work in behalf of law 
and order had attracted attention to his exceptional 
qualifications for a peace officer, and went far to- 
ward getting him the more important position of 
sheriff. He was re-elected in 1880, and distinguished 
himself not only in the routine duties of sheriff but 
also as a detective officer, effecting the capture of 
several well-known criminals. 

After retiring from the office Mr. Keyes invested 
his capital of $5,000 in a farm of 100 acres in sec- 
tion 2i of Otsego Township, and he still owns that 
place. He was successful as a farmer when he 
operated his own land and has been equally suc- 
cessful in the choice of his renters. William Lewis 
has been running the Keyes farm now for twelve 
years. In igoo Mr. Keyes moved to the village of 
Hamilton, and has since lived largely retired. 

In matters of politics he has supported the repub- 
lican party since voting for Lincoln the second time. 
He was trustee of Richland Township in 1876. Since 
he was seventeen years old he has been a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for a number 
of years has been a local minister. 

January 10, 1865, Mr. Keyes married Melvina 
Gary. She was born in Knox County, Ohio, Janu- 
ary 18, 1843, a daughter of William and Melissa 
Gary. Mr. and Mrs. Keyes were playmates in child- 
hood and were rocked in the same cradle. The Gary 
family were also pioneers of Steuben County. Mr. 
and Mrs. Keyes had no children of their own, but 
they reared from the age of eighteen months an 
adopted daughter known as Cora Keyes, who is now 
the wife of Elza Dewire, of Eaton, Ohio. Mr. and 
Mrs. Dewire have two living children, a son and a 
daughter. Mrs. Keyes died in igoi and in igo2 Mr. 
Keyes married Mrs. Eva Riblett, widow of Samuel 
Riblett. Her son, Victor Riblett, whose home is in 
Detroit, was in the great war, serving in the army at 
Fort Benjamin Harrison and Fort Shelby, was 
made a corporal at Fort Shelby and later at Camp 
Taylor was promoted to second lieutenant. Mr. and 
Mrs. Keyes had four children: Ella Odessa, aged 
fifteen, a high school student; William Howard, 
aged thirteen; lola, aged eleven; and Ruth May, 
who died in infancy. 

In many ways Mr. Keyes has exerted his personal 
influence for the good and upbuilding of his county. 
He had much to do with getting the Wabash Rail- 
road located through the village of Hamilton, mak- 
ing a visit to Detroit for a personal interview with 
the directors of the road. During his residence on 
the farm he also sold agricultural implements, espe- 
cially the Champion Binder and Harvester, and dis- 
tributed many of those machines throughout 
Steuben County. Mr. Keyes was elected president 
of the Steuben Sunday School Association and held 
that office six years. During that time he made 
Steuben one of the banner Sunday school counties of 



54 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



the state. He was also a Sunday school field worker 
for a number of years and attended the conventions 
regularly. 

Casper A. Deardorff is a well known farmer of 
Noble County and since his marriage has worked his 
way to independence, beginning as a renter and 
finally inirchasing the farm which he owns today, 
located a mile east of Cromwell in Sparta Township. 

He was born in Whitley County, Indiana, Decem- 
ber 17, 1862, a son of Abraham and Susan (Kendell) 
Deardorff. His father was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, October 17, 1S17, and died July 18, 1864, when 
Casper was only two years old. The mother was 
born in 1828 and died in 1888. _ Of their family of 
children only three are still living: Ozro, a farmer 
near Fort Wayne ; Ellen, wife of Solomon Fleck ; 
and Casper A. 

Casper A. Deardorff spent his boyhood days in 
Whitley County near Cherubusco, attending the dis- 
trict schools there during the winter sessions. Every 
summer as soon as his strength permitted he did his 
share of work on the home farm, and helped his 
mother to provide the necessities of her household. 
He lived with his mother to the age of twenty-one. 

In August, 1884, he married Miss Arie J. Gaff. 
She was born in Greene Township of Noble County, 
June 4, 1865, daughter of Joseph and Susan (Hawk) 
Gaff. Joseph D. Gaff was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, August II, 1833, and his wife was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, October 15, 1837, and is still 
living. The living children in the Gaff family are 
Mary, Henry, Arie J., Warren, Nora, Minnie, Cora, 
Lena and C)liver P. There are also forty grand- 
children. 

After their marriage Casper A. Deardorff and wife 
began housekeeping near Cherubusco as renters, sub- 
sequently moved to Elkhart County and farmed 
there fourteen years as renters, and by careful econ- 
omy and thrifty management secured the modest 
capital which enabled them in 1903 to buy their pres- 
ent farm of forty-seven acres. Mr. and Mrs. Dear- 
dorff have three children and twelve grandchildren. 
Etta, the oldest child, is a graduate of the common 
schools and the wife of Harry Bunger ; Albert L. 
is a graduate of the common schools and married 
Leda Cress ; Edna M. is the wife of Harrison 
Lemon. Mr. Deardorff is affiliated with the Knights 
of the Maccabees and is a republican in politics. 

Warrek K. Rosenbury, a former commissioner of 
Noble County, is proprietor of the Pleasant Hill 
Farm, three and a half miles north of Kendallville. 
Mr. Rosenbury is a native of Noble County and has 
spent most of his active career there as a practical 
and progressive farmer. He was born at a place 
three miles northeast of where he now lives May 
17, 1851. The Rosenbury family has been in Noble 
County for over seventy years. His parents were 
Andrew and Justine (Metlin) Rosenbury. His 
father was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, No- 
vember 25, 1811, and his motlier in Summit County 
of the same state, December 5, 181 1. They were 
married in Ohio and in 1848 came to Indiana and 
settled in Noble County. Their first settlement was 
six miles northeast of Kendallville. Seven years 
later they sold that farm, after improving it from 
the wilderness, and bought 280 acres where Warren 
K. Rosenbury now lives. The parents spent the rest 
of their days in that locality. Both were members 
of the Methodist Protestant Church. Of their nine 
children only two are now living. The daughter, 
lane M., lives in Kansas, the widow of Benjamin 
bevoe. 



Warren K. Rosenbury grew up on the farm where 
he now lives, attended the public schools, and was 
with his parents to the age of twenty-four. On 
February 15, 1877, he married Lorana Evans. She 
was born in Licking County, Ohio, March 23, 1855, 
was educated there, and became a teacher. She 
taught in Ohio and came to Indiana to teach. 

After his marriage Mr. Rosenbury lived in Ohio 
three years, and then returned to Noble County and 
settled in Allen Township. He sold his first farm 
and in 1892 bought 200 acres of the old homestead. 
He has made this a very productive place, devoted 
to general crops and stock, and has everything in 
a well ordered prosperity. 

Mr. Rosenbury lost his first wife by death Feb- 
ruary 15, 1899. They were the parents of three 
children : Joseph A., a graduate of the common 
schools and now living in Montana ; Lizzie L., a 
graduate of high school and wife of C. R. Nicewan- 
der, of South Bend, Indiana ; and Sarah T., wife 
of Floyd Dehal. On August 12, 1900, Mr. Rosen- 
bury married for his present wife Carrie Cothran. 
She was born in New York State. 

Mr. Rosenbury and family are members of the 
Presbyterian Church at Kendallville. He is affil- 
iated with the Knights of Pythias and in politics is 
a republican. He was elected on that ticket to the 
office of commissioner from the northern district, 
and served three years from January i, 1905. 

Mahue a. Brackney is a general farmer and 
stockman, with a well ordered farm in Noble Town- 
ship two miles north of Miriam. He was born in 
Jefferson Township of Noble County, July 14, 1873, 
son of George W. and Lucinda J. (Zimmerman) 
Brackney, both of whom are natives of Ohio. After 
their marriage they came to Indiana and settled in 
Jefferson Township and later moved to a farm in 
Green Township, where the father died after many 
years of industrious labor. The mother subsequent- 
ly removed to Albion, where she is still living. 
There were five children : Minnie, wife of Charles 
Sealey; Mahue A.; George J., of Tulsa, Oklahoma; 
Edna, wife of Albert Johnson ; Lulu, a kindergarten 
teacher. 

Mr. M. A. Brackney was fourteen years old when 
his parents removed to Green Township, and all his 
early education was acquired in the schools of Jef- 
ferson and Green. Living at home to the age of 
twenty-one, he acquired a practical knowledge of 
farming under the direction of his father, and since 
his marriage and the establishment of a home of 
his own he lias been making sturdy progress to- 
wards independence, and now has a good farm of 
eighty acres. 

He married Miss Nellie Ott, who was born in 
Noble Township, March 24, 1878, daughter of Cor- 
nelius Ott. To their union were born four children : 
Marie, a graduate of the common schools : Harry, 
at home ; Elsie, who also finished the common 
school course ; and Hubert, who is still a school 
boy. Mrs. Brackney is a member of the Burr Oak 
Baptist Church. Politically Mr. Brackney affiliates 
with the democratic party. 

John William Mertz. The wonderful changes 
that have been brought about by science and the 
ingenuity of man, even within the ordinary life- 
time of an individual, seem so marvelous that in- 
telligent and thoughtful earth dwellers of today 
hesitate about placing a limit to future achievement. 
In these changes agricultural industries have had 
place, and a modern American farm, in method of 
cultivation and its machinery equipments, illustrates 




CASPER A. DRARDORFF AND FAMILY 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



55 



unbelievable progress. Such a farm is the prop- 
erty of John William Mertz, a highly respected and 
substantial citizen of DeKalb County, Indiana, who 
is proprietor of the Lone Pine Farm in Fairfield 
Township. He was born in Indiana, as were his 
parents, Benjamin and Johanna (Auman) Mertz. 

The founder of the Indiana branch of the Mertz 
family was John G. Mertz, who came to the United 
States before the Civil war. His wife, Mary Anna 
( Saner) Mertz, was also of German birth. They 
lived at first in Ohio but before the birth of their 
son, Benjamin, came to DeKalb County, Indiana. 
The latter was a farmer like his father, and when 
he grew to manhood was married to Johanna 
Auman, who was one of a family of six children 
born to William and Miss (Bruns) Auman. To 
Benjamin and Johanna Mertz ten children were 
born, as follows: John W., Otto E., Walter B., 
Edward J., Henry A., Theodore A.. Daniel B., 
Metha M.. and two who died of diphtheria in early 
life. The father of this family died June 6, l8g8, 
and the mother died on the 25th of July, 1919, at 
Kendallville, Indiana. 

The pioneer Mertz family were charter 
members of Zion Evangelical Church located in 
Fairfield Township, near their farm, as early as 1852. 
There is a parochial school in connection with Zion 
Church, and it was in tliat school that John W. 
Mertz secured his first educational training. Later 
he was graduated from the Kendallville High School 
and for three years pursued a literary course of 
study in the University of Michigan, and in more 
recent years has attended short courses on special 
subjects at Purdue University. Since reaching man- 
hood he has been a farmer in Fairfield Township, 
DeKalb County, and has taken great interest in his 
work and through his progressive policy has brought 
the Lone Pine Farm into great prominence. As 
indicative of the approval of his methods by his 
fellow agriculturists, it may be mentioned that he 
is president of the DeKalb County Better Farming 
Association, which is county wide in its scope, and 
is also president of the DeKalb County Breeders & 
Feeders Association, and of the county branch of 
the Indiana Federation of Farmers. He is a mem- 
ber also of the Indiana Commercial Growers Asso- 
ciation. 

On February 25, igoS, John W. Mertz was united 
in marriage to Emma M. Krehl. who died January 
II, 1914. She was a daughter of William and .^nna 
(Carl) Krelil, a well known DeKalb County family. 
She was the mother of three children, namely: 
Selma .^nna, Margaret Ethel and .Xrthur Benjamin. 
On January 16, 1917, Mr. Mertz was married a sec- 
ond time, Mrs. Louise (Schneider) Bluhm becoming 
his wife. Mrs. Mertz has one son born to her for- 
mer marriage, Erich Bluhm. Mr. Mertz has sent 
his children to the same parochial school in which 
he began his education many years ago. 

In politics Mr. Mertz, like the older members of 
his family, has always supported the democratic 
party from principle and in other ways is worthy 
of ancestors who during long and useful lives were 
deserving of the general esteem in which they were 
held. As a man of progressive thought Mr. ^Mertz 
studies agricultural questions intelligently and is 
ready, in the light of the pas', to believe still more 
wonderful developments in the future. He keeps 
abreast of the times in farm equipment, carries on 
a general farming line and specializes in registered 
livestock. He can remember the day of the ox- 
team and the gradual development of horse trans- 
portation, the coming of the automobile and the 
farm tractor, and on occasion as he is working in 
his fields an unusual noise above him tells him that 
the aerial aeroplane is speeding as a bird with mail 



and messages from one frontier of his country to 
the other. He is proud of his country's achieve- 
ments and is proud of the part his own family has 
taken in the development of DeKalb County. 

Thom.^s Edgar Gundrum, now living retired at 
Angola, is one of the reliable and substantial repre- 
sentatives of Steuben County's agricultural life and 
for many seasons cultivated a large farm. From 
farming he received the competence he now enjoys. 

Mr. Gundrum was born in York Township in 
Steuben County, April 20, 1863. His father, Larry 
Gundrum, a son of John and Charlotte Gundrum, 
was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, May 26, 
1825, and at the age of si.\ accompanied his parents 
to Crawford County, Ohio. All the schooling he 
ever had in schoolrooms was not longer than seven 
weeks. At the age of si.xtecn he left home and 
became dependent upon his own resources for a 
living He learned the shoemaker's trade, and 
worked at that occupation in Crawford County, 
Ohio, after he married. In August, 1852, he brought 
his family to Steuben County and settled on 100 
acres which he had bought the previous year in 
section 18 of York Township. Later he bought an- 
other seventy acres, and he made farming a source 
of profit and pleasure and was one of the influential 
men in his community for many years. He was a 
republican in politics, was active in community 
aflfairs, served as a justice of the peace, and as a 
member of the Methodist Church helped build the 
Powers Church in York Township. He died April 
14, 1887. May 26, 1847, he married Lovina Beam, 
who was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, 
February 20, 1828. Until she was twelve years of 
age she could not speak a word of English. She 
died February 8, 1888, the mother of six children: 
Alonzo R.. who died at the age of two years ; Wil- 
liam C, John H., Theodore C., Mary Bell, wife of 
Cassius M. Thomas, and Thomas Edgar. 

Thomas Edgar Gundrum acquired his early educa- 
tion in the district schools of York and Fremont 
townships and in the Angola High School. His 
career as a farmer started on the old homestead, 
and after about one year there he moved to a farm 
of 100 acres near Angola, and made that his home 
for ten years. In 1807 he moved to ^'ork Township, 
buying IQ4 acres, and gave all his time to its man- 
agement until 1012, when he retired and moved to 
his present comfortable home in ."Vn.gola. Mr. Gun- 
drum has always been interested in the welfare of 
his home community, is a republican in politics and 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

October 8, 1887, he married Miss Lila A. Powers, 
who was born in York Township, September 4, 18C6, 
and was educated in the public schools of that lo- 
cality. Her father, Calvin P. Powers, was born in 
New York State in 1834 and was one of the exten- 
-o farmers qnH IpnH nwiiers in York Township. 
Calvin Powers married in i860, Jane Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gundrum had three children. Mark 
Duane, who was born March 26, 1889, graduated 
from high school at the age of sixteen, afterward 
took the course in the University of Medicine at 
Chicago, and left a successful and growing practice 
to enlist in May. 1917. in the Medical Reserve Corps. 
He was commissioned a first lieutenant and later 
was made captain. He served at Fort Oglethorpe, 
Georgia, until December, 1017, was then sent to Fort 
Clark, Texas, and in March, 1918, sailed for France 
and since then for over a year has been with the 
army on the western front, being now with the 
Army of Occupation. Doctor Gundrum married 
Erna Senkey. and thev have a daughter, Virginia 
Rozclle. Mildred Elizabeth, the second child of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gundrum, is the wife of John Dorsey 



56 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Folck, a farmer, and has two children, Martha 
Leona and Jessie Marie. The third and youngest 
child is Lolabelle, now a resident of Washington, 
District of Columbia. 

Thomas J. Halferty. One of the oldest farms 
under one continuous ownership in Noble County- 
is the Meadow Brook Farm, comprising 179 acres, 
all in section 33 of Orange Township. The present 
proprietor is Thomas J. Halferty. Mr. Halferty 
was born there, and all his life has been familiar 
with its scenes, associations and activities. 

He was born August i, i860, son of William and 
Catherine (Brodebeck) Halferty. His father was 
born in Morrow County, Ohio, May I, 1819, and 
died July 27, 1875. His mother was born in Mary- 
land, April 22, 1820. and when she was a girl her 
family moved to Clark County, Ohio, and later to 
Morrow County, where she was married. The par- 
ents after a brief residence in Morrow County 
moved to Noble County, Indiana, and were pioneers 
in the community of Brimfield, where they de- 
veloped a tract of raw land in section 33 of Orange 
Township. There the father and mother spent the 
rest of their lives on the old farm. They were 
among the first members of the United Brethren 
Church in that community and were active support- 
ers of the cause. In politics William Halferty was 
a democrat. To him and his wife were born four 
children, two of whom died in infancy. The only 
surviving daughter is Mary E., born May n, 1857, 
and now the wife of Mason B. Faux, of Orange 
Township. 

Thomas J. Halferty learned much of the science 
of farming when a boy. He also acquired a good 
education in the local schools. He was about 
fifteen when his father died, and almost from that 
time forward he had an active and responsible part 
in the management of the homestead. 

September 19, 1883, he married Miss Emma L. 
Kiser. She was born in Jefferson Township of 
Noble County, November 24, i860, daughter of 
Michael and Elizabeth (Stotts) Kiser. Michael 
Kiser was born in Huron County, Ohio, grew up 
and married there, and in 1858 became one of the 
pioneer settlers in Jefferson Township of Noble 
County, Indiana. Mrs. Halferty had a common 
school" education. She and her husband have two 
children. Addie D., who was born November 22, 
i88t;, is the wife of Ora Bowen, and they have a 
daughter, Talitha, born November 22, 1903. Mr. 
and Mrs. Halferty are .very proud of this grand- 
daughter. Their son, Thomas O., born November 
6, 1887, was educated in the common schools and 
now lives at home and has assumed many of the 
responsibilities of the farm. He married Hazel B 
Harp. The family are members of the United 
Brethren Church and Mr. Halferty has been a 
leader in that denomination. He is a republican and 
has served as township supervisor. 

John W. Adair. When John W. Adair was 
elected member of the County Board of Commis- 
sioners of Noble County on November 5, 1918, to 
represent the Southern District, he received the 
support of a large majority of his neighbors and 
old friends, who respected his integrity of character, 
his good business ability and judgment, and his long 
standing as a successful farmer in the county. 

Mr. Adair, whose farm of 160 acres lies in sec- 
tions 18 and 19 in Noble Township, was born in 
Washington Township of the same county, Feb- 
ruary I, 1868, son of John N. and Christina (Bash- 
ford) Adair, both natives of Ohio. The respective 
families came to Noble County, Indiana, at an early 



day, and John and Christina were married here and 
then settled on a farm in Washington Township. 
Later they lived for a time in Wisconsin, but on 
returning to Indiana settled in Noble Township, 
where they spent the rest of their days. John Adair 
was active in the republican party and at one time 
served as justice of the peace in Whitley County. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Church. There were four sons in the family: Wil- 
liam, of Whitley County; Thomas, of Whitley 
County; Edwin L., of Albion; and John W. 

John W. Adair grew up on his father's farm, and 
received the advantages of the district schools to 
the age of si.xteen, He then continued to live at 
home with his parents until he was twenty-one, and 
on March 31, 1894, he established a home of his own 
by his marriage to Ella E. Knapp. She was also 
born in Washington Township. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Adair bought 
a farm in Washington Township, but after seven 
years bought their present home in Noble Township. 
They have been greatly prospered as farmers and 
in 1915 they completed a modern country home. 
Mr. Adair is also a director in the Wolf Creek 
Bank and a stockholder in the Cromwell-Sparta 
State Bank. 

He and his wife are members of the Baptist 
Church and he on its finance committee. Mr. and 
Mrs. Adair have four children : Merle, a student 
in Wolf Lake High School; Helen F., also a high 
school girl ; and Joseph and Donald, both attending 
the grade schools. 

John D. Miller, Jr., is one of the leading farmers 
and stock men of Eden Township, and has been 
identified with the agricultural enterprise of La- 
Grange County since early manhood. 

He was born on a farm in Elkhart County, In- 
diana, July 10, 1885, a son of David C. J. and Fannie 
Miller. The parents were both natives of Elkhart 
County, his father born six miles east of Goshen. 
David J. Miller spent his life on the old home 
where he was born and reared. He and his wife 
were members of the Amish Mennonite Church. In 
their family were eight children : Jacob D., John 
D,, Catherine deceased, Lizzie, Lydia, Clara, Amos 
and Fannie. 

John D. Miller grew up on the farm where his 
father was born, attended district schools and 
worked for his father to the age of twenty-one. 
On February 22, 1906, he married Katie Christner. 
They have no children of their own but have an 
adopted child. They are active members of the 
Amish Mennonite Church. 

Mr. Miller has a good farm of ninety-nine acres 
in Eden Township. He specializes in the breeding 
of Hereford cattle, his herd being headed by Tips 
Star Light and Tips Cherry Lass. 

Morton Friend is proprietor of a farm in Mil- 
grove Township, part of which was acquired by his 
maternal grandfather, a member of the original 
Vermont colony in that part of Steuben County. 
Some of the fields have been in cultivation eighty 
years, and under its present ownership the farm is 
one of the best in Steuben County. 

Mr. Morton Friend was born on this farm, lo- 
cated a mile north of Orland, July 13, i873- He is 
a son of Jefferson L. and Nancy (Kidder) Friend, 
his mother having also been born on the same land. 
She was a daughter of Alanson Kidder, a native of 
Vermont, who married Alzoa Chapin. Alanson 
Kidder was with the first settlers who came from 
Vermont to Steuben County in 1836, and was an in- 
fluential member of the Vermont settlement in and 
around Orland. He acquired his land, cleared it, 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



57 



and farmed it until about 1866, when he sold and 
subsequently moved to Trempealeau County, Wis- 
consin, where he died. His children were Mary, 
Laura. Joseph, Alzoa and Nancy. Alanson Kidder 
had eighty acres of the farm now owned by Morton 
Friend. 

Jefferson L. Friend was a native of Stark County, 
Ohio, and as a boy during the '50s went with his 
parents to Williams County. Ohio, making the 
journey with ox teams. He grew to manhood in 
Northwest Ohio, and attended school at Orland. 
He left school to enter the army and served during 
the last eleven months of the war in the Fourteenth 
Michigan Infantry. A few years afterward he 
bought the eighty acres from Alanson Kidder, and 
through his energy as a farmer and good manager 
increased his holdings to about J05 acres. He lived 
there the rest of his life. His children were : Fan- 
nie, wife of Dr. Philip Quick, of Olivet. Michigan; 
Guy K., who married Emma Barber ; Morton ; Zoa, 
wife of Elmer Hunter; and Gretchen, wife of Jesse 
Reek. 

Morton Friend acquired his education at Orland, 
finishing in the high school. Since boyhood he has 
been at work on the home farm, and since 1900 has 
been farming the place for himself. He owns 178 
acres in sections 17 and 20. and as a stock man is a 
breeder of blooded Holstein cattle. 

In 1903 he married Effie Freeman, a daughter of 
Samuel and Olive Freeman. They have three 
children, named Maynard J., Frances Josephine and 
Philip K. 

Albert J. Collins. There are several communi- 
ties in Northeast Indiana and Southern Michigan 
which are deeply appreciative of the services of 
Albert J. Collins, particularly as an educator. For 
thirty-eight years he was a schoolmaster, school ad- 
ministrator, and only recently retired from his office 
as superintendent of schools at Orland to take up 
his duties as clerk of the Circuit Court of Steuben 
County, an office to which he was elected in 1918. 
His official duties require his residence at Angola, to 
which city he moved in the summer of 1919. 

Mr. Collins was born in Delaware Township, De- 
fiance County. Ohio. November 27. 1861. He repre- 
sents old American stock. His grandparents were 
William and Maria Collins. The former a native 
of Pennsylvania, moved in early manhood to De- 
fiance County. Ohio, and spent most of his active life 
as a farmer in Defiance and Williams County. His 
children were named John. William. Jr.. Jesse L., 
Mary and Nancy. The parents of the Steuben 
County official were Jesse L. and Rachel (Gro\y) 
Collins, the former a native of Lucas County. Ohio, 
and the latter of Pennsylvania, daughter of Martin 
and Elizabeth (Myers) Grow. Jesse L. Collins 
when a young man took up farming in Defiance 
County, moved to Williams County in that state 
in 1864. and for the rest of his active life was 
busily engaged with the duties of his farm. He 
spent his last days on the farm of his son Albert 
in Millgrove Township, where he died August 11, 
191 1. He and his wife were active members of the 
Dunkard Church. They had a large family of 
thirteen children, four of whom died in infancy. 
The other nine were named Alvaro S.. Albert J., 
Elizabeth M., Diantha, who died in childhood, Viola 
T., Melissa E., Jesse Elmer, who died when a boy, 
Ora E. and Chloe G. 

Albert J. Collins attended his first schools in 
Williams County, Ohio. He took his high school 
work at Montpelier and Pioneer, Ohio, and from 
high school entered Hillsdale College in Michigan, 
where he completed the regular course and grad- 



uated in 1892. Mr. Collins was a member of the 
Alpha Tau Omega Greek Letter fraternity at Hills- 
dale, and was also well known in athletic circles. 
He especially excelled as a wrestler, and has in 
his possession six medals won in contests held under 
the auspices of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association. 

Since his graduation from Hillsdale Mr. Collins 
with the exception of one year, has steadily devoted 
his time to teaching. In the fall of 1893 he came 
to Orland as superintendent of public schools. He 
was connected with the schools of that town until 
1901, and from then until 1907 was superintendent 
of schools at Hamilton and from 1907 to 1912 was 
superintendent at White Pigeon, Michigan. During 
1912-13 he was temporarily retired from school 
work, and spent that year on his farm in Millgrove 
Township. He resumed his work with the Orland 
schools in 1913 as assistant superintendent, and in 
1914 was made superintendent. Orland has some 
of the best public schools in Steuben County, and 
many of the improvements and advances have been 
made while Mr. Collins has been in charge. 

He owns a fine farm of 120 acres in section 32 of 
Alillgrove and in section 5 of Jackson Township. 
Mr. Collins was therefore not without long and 
practical experience in official affairs when he was 
inducted into the office of clerk of the Circuit 
Court. He is a member of the Masonic Order at 
Orland. 

November 7, 1891, he married Eva Jane Cleve- 
land, a daughter of Albertus B. and Rebecca J. 
Cleveland. Thev have had seven children, named 
as follows : Albert Russell, Lois G., Gelee, who 
died when four months old. Floiad G., Cleveland C, 
Rachel R. and Albertus B. 

Alfred H. King. The roll of prosperous farmers 
in Swan Township of Noble County would not be 
complete without reference to the name of Alfred 
H. King, who for many years has successfully 
tended his acres and looked after his interests as an 
agriculturist at his home in section 12. 

Mr. King represents one of the oldest established 
families in this part of Northeast Indiana. He was 
born in Swan Township. November i. 1872. and is 
a son of Ira M. and Catherine (Haines) King, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. Ira M. King was born September 18, 1828, 
and came to Indiana at an early date. His parents 
settled in Noble County as early as 1837, and were 
arnong the first to develop the lands in Swan Town- 
ship. He married for his first wife Jane Perry, a 
sister of George Perry. There were three children 
by that union, one of whom is John King, now a 
resident of Michigan. Ira King married for his 
second wife Catherine Haines, who came to Noble 
County in 1854. To their marriage were born seven 
children, three of whom are still living: Frank E., 
a graduate of Purdue University with the degree 
of Civil Engineer, and has attained prominence in 
his profession; Alfred H. ; and Lloyd E.. who grad- 
uated from Purdue University with the degree of 
Electrical Engineer and is now connected with the 
Western Electric Company at Peru. Illinois. 

Alfred H. King grew up on the old farm in Swan 
Township, and chose agriculture as his vocation. 
After finishing the course of the common schools 
he attended Avilla High School, and later graduated 
from Purdue University with the degree Bachelor 
of Science. He has turned his university training 
to good account as a farmer. For several years he 
looked after the home farm and he now owns 
ninety-five acres. 

August 29, 1901, he married Miss Alberta Boden- 



58 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



hafer, daughter of Levi and Eva (Morgan) Boden- 
hafer. Mrs. King is a graduate of the Avilla High 
School, and before her marriage was a teacher at 
Kendallville. Mr. and Mrs. King have three chil- 
dren : Laura A., a graduate of the high school, and 
Winston L. and Harry P. The family are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Avilla and 
Mr. King is one of the official board and superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. Politically he is a 
republican. 

Jacob C. Trover has spent many years as a suc- 
cessful farmer in LaGrange County, his home being 
a mile north and three-quarters of a mile west of 
Topeka. He is in Eden Township and owns a 
seventy-acre place in sections twenty-three and 
twenty-four. 

Mr. Troyer was born in Wayne County, Ohio, 
February 4, 1868, a son of Levi B. and Leah (Zook) 
Troyer. His father was born in Holmes County, 
Ohio, and at the age of four years went to Wayne 
County, where he spent the rest of his life. His 
wife was a native of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, 
but was married in Ohio. In the family of Levi 
Troyer and wife were five children : Mennow Z., 
of McPherson County, Kansas; Joel L., of West 
Liberty, Ohio ; Jacob C, and Mary A. and Emma, 
the latter of McPherson County, Kansas. 

Jacob C. Troyer grew up on his father's farrn in 
Wayne County and lived there until he was thirty 
years of age. He married in Indiana and then for 
a brief time lived in Wayne County before coming 
to his present place in LaGrange County. 

Mr. Troyer married Elizabeth Hostettler Decem- 
ber 6, 1892. She was born in Newbury Township of 
LaGrange County December 7, 1870, daughter of 
Moses and Mary A. (Mehl) Hostettler. She was 
reared and educated in her native township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Troyer have no children of their own but 
have adopted a nephew of Mrs. Troyer, Keith W. 
Hostettler, who is a graduate of the common schools 
and is now in the high school at Goshen. Mr. 
Troyer and family are members of the Mennonite 
Church at Maple Grove. He is a republican in 
politics and is a stockholder in the Topeka State 
Bank. 

Frank B. Dixlfr, who has lived in Steuben Coun- 
ty over sixty years, is the only surviving son of a 
rather large family, and taking the old homestead 
which had been cleared and improved by his father 
in Scott Township, he has gone steadily ahead im- 
proving and making use of his talents, and has in- 
creased his material possessions until he is now 
one of the leading farmers of the county. 

Mr. Deller was born in Williams County, Ohio, 
January 18, 1854, a son of Benjamin and Hannah 
(Wolf) Deller, His mother was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1823. Benjamin Deller, who was born in 
France in 1813, was fourteen years old when he 
came with his parents to New York City. He was 
a son of Gotlieb and Elizabeth Deller, who soon 
located in Pennsylvania, and afterward moved to 
Columbiana County, Ohio, where Gotlieb died a few 
years later on his farm. His widow then lived with 
her children and moved with them to Williams 
County, Ohio, during the '40s. The Deller family 
had a log house in Williams County. In 1857 they 
came to Steuben County, where Benjamin Deller 
and wife settled on the farm now owned by their 
son Frank. Of 160 acres not a stick of timber had 
been cut, and the first home of the family was a log 
building. Benjamin Deller as his fneans increased 
put up a substantial barn in 1859 and a house in i860, 
and lived there in comfortable circumstances until 
his death in 1874. His wife died in 1876. He was 



a democrat, and they were members of the Dunkard 
Church. Their children were : Lucinda ; William, 
who was a Union soldier, was wounded in battle 
and died at Nashville, Tennessee; twin children 
who died in infancy ; Elizabeth ; Jane ; Frank ; Mary ; 
and Lydia. 

Frank Deller grew up on the old homestead and 
acquired a good education in the district schools and 
in the Angola High School. In early manhood he 
applied his energies to farming on the home place, 
and had just come to manhood when his father 
died. Taking the original 160 acres, he has gradu- 
ally increased its area until he now has 358 acres. 
This land is improved with modern buildings, and 
the material for those buildings came chiefly from 
timber grown and cut on the farm. Mr. Deller is a 
general farmer and stock raiser. He has a pure- 
bred Shorthorn bull and grades of Holstein and 
Jersey cattle. He has never sought any office, and is 
a democratic voter. He gave the land on which 
the South Scott Union Church is built, and there his 
family attend church and Sunday school. 

Mr. Deller is proud of his family of children and 
his numerous grandchildren. March 18, 1877, he 
married Miss Clara Cleveland, who was born in 
Steuben County, November n, 1850, a daughter of 
Frederick and Amelia (Taylor) Cleveland. Her 
parents were pioneers in the county, where her 
father died in 1864. Her mother later married John 
Lininger, and she died August 6, iqci. Mr. and 
Mrs. Deller have six children : William, Lowell, 
Ella, Margie, Frank H. and Wayne B. The two 
youngest sons are in the home circle. William, 
whose home is in Steuben Township, married Lena 
Dutler and has five children, named Ruth, Maud, 
Helen, Hershel and Lewis. Lowell, who lives in the 
northwest corner of Scott Township, married Jennie 
Quance, and has four children, Audry, Russell, 
Roscoe and Margaret. Ella is the wife of Gary E. 
Covell, former county surveyor and chairman of the 
Draft Board, and has two children, Lucile and Wen- 
dell. Margie is the wife of Carl Sanders and the 
mother of two children, Dorothy and Willis. Margie 
Deller was first married to Earl Beard and had one 
son, Robert. 

A. J. Rich has lived a life of varied experience, 
rich in service and hard work, but for the greater 
part he has been a successful farmer in Noble 
County. Mr. Rich has a fine and well improved 
place of 221 acres in section JS of Swan Township, 
and makes his home in the Village of Laotto. 

He was born in Eel River Township of Allen 
County, Indiana. July 27, 1864, son of Byram L. 
and Sarmelia (Brook) Rich. His father was born 
in Knox County, Ohio, July 2, 1833, and his mother 
in Delaware County, Ohio, July 3rd, of the same 
year. She came with her parents to Noble County 
and they settled in Green Township as early as 
1848, and spent the rest of their days there. 

The Rich family is one of the pioneers in the 
early history of Allen County, Indiana. They set- 
tled on the Maumee River, eight miles east of 
Fort Wayne, as early as 1837. Four years later 
they moved to Whitley County, near Churubusco. 
The father of Byram L. Rich was a blacksmith by 
trade. He kept a well patronized shop on his land 
in Whitley County. He was a very slcillful worker 
and deserved all the patronage that came to him. 
Later he went to Mason County, Illinois, but finally 
returned to Whitley County and spent his last years 
in Churubusco. He was an active member of the 
Baptist Church. He was a republican and for many 
years held the office of justice of the peace. The 
death of this old pioneer occurred in 1887. 

Byram L. Rich was one of six children, .'\fter 



IISTURV UF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



59 



his marriage he went to Illinois, then lived in Allen 
County. Indiana, for some years, and in 1873 moved 
to Noble County. During all his active life he 
was engaged in the lumber business. He and his 
wife w;ere rnembers of the Dunkard Church. Of 
their nine children five grew to maturity, and those 
still living are: Appleton ; Mrs. Sloffer, of Laotto ; 
A. J. Rich; and Mrs. Dickes. 

A. J. Rich was nine years old when his parents 
moved to Noble County, and he received some of 
his schooling here. In 1879 he went back to Allen 
County, and in 18S3 he and his brother went south 
and he was in the South for a period of eighteen 
months. On returning to Allen County he worked 
on his father's farm. September 20, 1891, Mr. Rich 
married Ida A. Zinn. She was born on the farm in 
section 25 of Swan Township September I, 1868, 
and was educated in the common schools. Her 
father, Levi Zinn, was a native of Pennsylvania and 
married Mary A. Fryer. They were married in 
Noble County, Indiana, and then located in DeKalb 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Rich are the parents of two 
children : Waldo A., born July 13, 1892, has been 
in the service of the United States army during 
the great war, and Perma A., a graduate of high 
school and now a student in Indiana State Uni- 
versity. 

The family are members of the Lutheran Church. 
Mr. Rich is a Mason, and his wife and children are 
members of the Eastern Star. In politics he is a 
steadfast supporter of republican interests. 

George W. Geiger is one of the oldest residents of 
Green Township, Noble County, and his position 
and citizenship is the more esteemed because of the 
fact that he is a surviving veteran of the great war 
for the Union. He was a young man when he bore 
arms in defense of the flag, and since then for more 
than half a century he has been identified with the 
agricultural community where he was born and 
reared. 

On the farm that he now owns, comprising 100 
acres, he was born, March 7, 1841, son of Thomas 
and Mary J. (McGuire) Geiger. His parents were 
born in Licking County, Ohio, his father December 
22, 1814, and his mother in 1815. They were mar- 
ried in Licking County, September 18, 1835, and a 
few days later they joined a party of thirty or more 
who started with wagons and teams and after six 
weeks of journeying over rough roads and trails 
arrived on Eel River in Indiana, October 20. 1835. 
In Green Township, of Noble County. Thomas 
Geiger bought 200 acres of wild land. He at once 
began its clearing and cultivation, and continued one 
of the sturdy citizens of that locality the rest of 
his life. He was an active member of the Baptist 
Church and a republican. Of eleven children born 
to this worthy pioneer couple only four are now 
living: William, a farmer in Green Township; 
Clara, wife of Horace McDuffee; George W. ; and 
Irene, widow of James Harter. 

George W. Geiger grew up on the home farm 
and as a boy assisted in the work of the fields and 
in clearing more of the land. He had a common 
school education. On .\ugust 7, 1862. he enlisted 
in Company E of the Eightieth Indiana Infantry. A 
few weeks later, on the 8th of October, he partici- 
pated in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky. Decem- 
ber 29, 1862, he was in the battle of Murfreesboro 
or Stone River, and after that continued with his 
command until May 12, 1863, when he was taken ill, 
and after a period in a hospital was granted an hon- 
orable discharge November 3, 1863. He then re- 
turned home and has since applied himself to the 



main business of life, farming, of which he has made 
a notable success. 

On August 12, 1862, a few days after his enlist- 
ment in the army, Mr. Geiger married Miss Rebecca 
Russell. They had a long and happy life together 
for over half a century, until their companionship 
was terminated by her death on August 17, 1913. 
Mr. Geiger has four children: Catherine, wife of 
William Ho.sler; Dora, wife of C. V. Crider ; A. M. 
Geiger, of Allen County, Indiana; and Hcrschel 
Geiger, of Green Township, Noble County. June 
27. 1918, Mr. Geiger married Mrs. Alice Robinson, 
who was born in Allen Countv, Indiana. Her 
maiden name was Alice Pratt. Mr. Geiger and 
family are members of the Close Communion Bap- 
tist Church, and in politics he is a republican. 

John W. Low. The family name of Low is one 
of the first to occur in tlie annals of Clear Spring 
Township, LaGrange County, and the veteran farmer 
and business man, proprietor of the Sunnyside Farm 
in Eden Township, John W. Low, is a son of the 
original pioneer. 

Mr. Low, whose farm is a mile and one-quarter 
north of Topeka, was born in Clear Spring Town- 
ship February 9, 1845, a son of Nicholas and Eliza- 
beth (Hendricks) Low. His parents were both 
natives of Baltimore County, Maryland, where they 
grew up and on coming west lived for a time in 
Ohio and in 1832 entered three hundred twenty 
3cres in Clear Spring Township. They were prob- 
ably the second family to locate in that township, 
which then was a wilderness with the Indians still 
roaming through the woods. Nicholas Low cleared a 
space among the trees for his cabin, and gradually 
cleared up his land and died there about 1885. His 
wife was a member of the Methodist Church "and he 
was a democrat 111 politics. In their family were 
nine children, four of whom died in infancy one 
at the age of ten years, and the others are: Mary 
J-, wife of Joel Greenawalt, of Clear Spring Town- 
ship; Thomas, living in California; John, and Mar- 
tha, widow of Solomon Herrington. 

John Low grew up on his father's farm and had a 
district school education. In November, 1867 he 
married EHzabeth Coppes. She was a daughter of 
Kichard and Hannah Coppes and spent her girlhood 
in Clear Spring Township, where she and Mr Low 
attended the same school. After their marriage 
they lived on the Coppes Farm for three vears, and 
m 1872 bought the place where Mr. Low is still 
living. He has a ninety-acre farm and many years 
ot industry have brought their sure rewards in 
comfort and a competence for his declining years 
Mr. Low lost his first wife January 20, 1889. She 
was the mother of three children: Hannah, who 
attended the common schools and Hillsdale College 
and IS now the wife of Rudolph Kcnagy, of Topeka, 
Indiana; Martha J., a graduate of the State Nor- 
mal bchool, has been a very successful teacher, doing 
her first work in di.strict schools, spending eight 
years at Marion, Indiana, for three years was at Gary 
Indiana, two years at Oakland, California, and is now 
connected with the schools of Michigan City, and 
tmnia, who also attended the State Normal and 
taught for a number of years in the district schools, 
IS the w-ife of William O. Hostettler of Eden Town- 
sliip. On May 3. i8qi, Mr. Low married Laura 
Prentiss, of Noble County, where she was born, 
Mrs Low IS a veteran teacher, having thirty-two 
terms to her credit. She is a member of the Baptist 
Church at Topeka. Mr. Low was counted as the 
second active prohibitionist in his township, and 
several times served as countv chairman of his 
party. He and his wife are both stockholders in 
the Farmers State Bank of Topeka 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



William E. Butz. While he has always gone 
about his affairs quietly and with an unassuming 
nature, William E. Butz has been identified with the 
energetic and enterprising citizenship of Noble Coun- 
ty for over thirty years, and is one of its most 
useful citizens. 

He was born on a farm in York Township adjoin- 
ing the one where he lives today on May 14, 1868. 
His father. Christian Butz, was born in Germany 
and came to the United States when a young man, 
first locating in York Township of Noble County 
and later buying land there. He married Mary Lee, 
and they spent the rest of their days in that locality. 
They were members of the Lutheran Church and 
Christian was a democrat. He and his wife had ten 
children, and nine are still living: Minnie, of York 
Township ; Ulric, a farmer, contractor and carpenter 
in York Township ; John G., a York Township farm- 
er ; Anna, wife of John Shisler; Lena, wife of Clar- 
ence Wemple ; William E. ; Ida, wife of George 
Hoffman; Fred, of Kendallville ; and Clara, wife of 
Thorlo Shaffer, of Kendallville. 

William E. Butz grew up on the home farm and 
had a district school education. After reaching man- 
hood he married Delma Renahan. They are the par- 
ents of six children : Cleo, a graduate of high school, 
who attended Defiance College in Ohio and is now 
the wife of Walter Wolfe; Lela, a graduate of high 
school and wife of Harvey Hull; Forest, a high 
school graduate ; Harold, in the second year of high 
school; Walter, in the eighth grade; and Ruby. 

Mr. Butz has been greatly prospered in his busi- 
ness affairs and is proprietor of the Walnut Row 
Farm, consisting of three hundred and forty acres 
and one of the best farms in York Township. Mr. 
Butz is well known as a breeder of Belgian horses 
and Shorthorn cattle. He is one of the directors of 
the Farmers State Bank of Wawaka, a director in 
the Farmers Telephone Company, and in politics is 
a democrat. He is a member of the Lutheran 
Church, while his wife and children are members of 
the Christian Church. 

Claud D. Killinger. Every progressive com- 
munity in order to keep up its progress must de- 
pend not only upon the enterprise of its older fam- 
ilies but also the fresh blood and life of new- 
comers. One of the younger men who have 
recently identified themselves with Steuben County 
is Claud D. Killinger, now the head of a thriving 
business as a merchant at Metz. 

Mr. Killinger was born at Edgerton in Williams 
County, Ohio, January 4, 1880, a son of William 
Henry and Mary (Schaffer) Killinger. His parents 
were both born in Williams County, his father in 
1849 and his mother in 1851. The grandparents, 
John and Rebecca Killinger, and John and Mary 
Schaffer, were identified with the very early settle- 
ment and development of Williams County. William 
Henry Killinger grew up on a farm, had a public 
school education and as the oldest son assumed 
responsibilities in advance of his years. He con- 
tinued farming until 1888, and since then has been 
engaged in the meat business at Edgerton. He is a 
republican and served for several years as assessor, 
and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is an active member of the Methodist 
Church. His first wife died in 1888, the mother of 
four children. Holly, Edward, Claud D. and Georgia. 
For his second wife William H, Killinger married 
Sarah Eve, and they have two children, Gola May 
and Maurice. 

Claud D. Killinger grew up at Edgerton, at- 
tended the high school there, and while going to 
school was clerk and delivery boy with a local gro- 



cery firm. Later he learned more about merchandis- 
ing as clerk at Edgerton, and in 1913 moved to Metz 
to take the management of the Stiefel store. Four 
years later, when the Stiefel Company went out of 
business, he remained at the old stand, introducing 
his stock of goods, and today the C. D. Killinger 
Company supplies much of the merchandise con- 
sumed in that section of Steuben County, 

Mr. Killinger is a republican and is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias at Metz. In 1905 he married 
Miss Glida Sickels, of Steuben County, daughter of 
Ananias and Flora Sickels, who were early settlers 
here. The father is still living in Metz. 

Frederick L. Bluhm is one of the oldest bankers 
of Kendallville in point of active experience. He 
is now secretary of the Kendallville Trust & Sav- 
ings Company and has been connected at different 
times with practically all the banks of that city. 

He was born March 20, 1856, and in 1871, at the 
age of fifteen, came to the United States with his 
parents. The family located at Kendallville, where 
he finished his education. A poor boy, he went 
to work on the farm of John Mitchell, and was in 
his employ for about nine years. During that time 
he also attended night school and made himself pro- 
ficient in the English language and other branches. 
He also saved most of his earnings, and had a 
steady ambition to make the best of his opportuni- 
ties. For a year he worked in the great car works 
of Haskell & Barker at Michigan City, but then 
resumed employment with Mr. Mitchell, then pres- 
ident of the First National Bank of Kendallville. 
Mr. Mitchell took much interest in the young man, 
gave him every encouragement and opportunity to 
learn banking thoroughly, and if there is any de- 
tail in the management of a bank in which he has 
not had experience Mr. Bluhm does not know what 
it is. He worked as a janitor, as general utility 
boy, and clerk, and from that through all the 
grades of responsibilty. He was with the First 
National Bank from 1882 to 1893. He was then 
made cashier, and continued with the institution 
until it liquidated May i, 1894. After that he was 
with the Campbell & Fetter Bank fifteen years, and 
resigned to become assistant cashier in the Noble 
County Bank. After eight years there he entered 
upon his present duties as secretary of the Kendall- 
ville Trust & Savings Company. 

Mr. Bluhm married May 29, 1888, Louise Lang. 
She was born in Brooklyn, New York, March 24, 
1859. and was brought to Kendallville by her par- 
ents in 1864. She was educated in the public schools 
of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Bluhm have two chil- 
dren: Maurice L., born March 25, 1889, a graduate 
of the Kendallville High School and of Indiana 
University with the degree A. B., following which 
he entered the law school of the University of Chi- 
cago. He is now serving as an interne in the United 
States navy. He married Clara Miller, a teacher 
in the public schools of Kendallville. Edith Bluhm, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bluhm, is a graduate 
of the Kendallville High School and wife of John 
F. Gerwig, of Auburn, Indiana. The Bluhm family 
are members of the German Lutheran Church, and 
politically he is a republican. He has served as city 
clerk three years and was a member of the City 
Council from 1899 to 1911. 

Samuel F. Harlan is one of the older residents 
of Green Township, Noble County, and for a num- 
ber of years has been the proprietor of what is 
known as High Point Farm, situated on the highest 
point of land between Fort Wayne and Goshen. 




c^^ryu. ^. U^yuJ^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



61 



Mr. Harlan is a man who has become successful 
through his own exertions and by relying entirely 
upon himself. He started life without capital beyond 
a pair of willing hands, and has gained a good farm, 
provided for his family, and enjoys the complete 
respect and esteem of a large community. 

He was born in section 17 of Green Township 
July 19, 1869, son of James and Agnes (Baker) 
Harlan. His parents were both natives of Ohio, his 
father a native of Ashland County. They were 
married in that state and then came to Indiana and 
lived on a farm in Green Township of Noble Coun- 
ty, where they spent the rest of their days. Both 
were active members of the Christian Church and 
the father was a republican. Their five living chil- 
dren are: Myrtle, wife of John S. Friskney; Jane, 
wife of Abraham Ott ; Fannie, wife of Frederick 
Ott ; Daniel, of Noble Township; and Samuel F. 

Samuel F. Harlan grew up on his father's farm 
and had a limited district school education. When 
he was only twelve years old a neighboring farmer 
offered him a home and wages of four dollars a 
month. From that as a beginning he steadily in- 
creased his abilities and in a few years was getting 
si.xteen dollars a month as a farm hand. He was 
not a spendthrift as a youth and by the time he 
was twenty-one years of age had more capital laid 
away than most young men at that period of life. 

On November 22, 1890, Mr. Harlan married Miss 
Catherine Hire. She was born in Whitley County, 
Indiana, October 22, 1871, daughter of Leonard and 
Ellen (Bumbaugh) Hire. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Harlan bought forty acres, included within 
their present home, but they have greatly extended 
their possessions until they now have 180 acres, all 
well improved and constituting some of the most 
productive soil in Noble County. The farm has a 
good barn and a modern home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlan had four children: Cleta 
May married Omer Zumbrun of Green Township ; 
Bernice E. is the deceased wife of Floyd Shively; 
Elza J. is unmarried and living at home; and Lynn 
H., born in 1908, is still in school. The family are 
members of the Church of the Brethren and Mr. 
Harlan is one of its deacons. In politics he is a 
republican. 

William O. Hildebrand, M. D. In the county 
where he was born and reared Dr. William O. 
Hildebrand has carried on a very successful career 
as a physician and surgeon for the past fifteen years, 
with home and offices at Topeka. 

Doctor Hildebrand was born in Bloomfield Town- 
ship of LaGrange County April 2Q. 1876, a son of 
William and Derline (Debow) Hildebrand. His 
father was born in Mansfield, Ohio, in 1841 and his 
mother in LaGrange County, Indiana, in 184.S. Mr. 
Hildebrand when a boy came to DeKalb County, 
Indiana, with his parents, Moses and Maria (Seig- 
ler) Hildebrand. who located near .Auburn. He 
grew up there and after his marriage settled on a 
farm in Bloomfield Township. His wife died there 
in 1884. They were active members of the Method- 
ist Church. 

Doctor Hildebrand, only son of his parents, grew 
up on a farm northeast of LaGrange, and completed 
his preliminary education in the common schools 
there. He graduated from the LaGrange High 
School in 1898, and acquired his first knowledge of 
medicines as a drug clerk at Kendallville, where he 
remained two years. He paid his own way through 
the Indiana Medical College, entering in 1901 and 
graduating in 1905. He has done much to improve 
his opportunities not only by experience but also by 
a post-graduate course at Chicago in 1907 and one 



at the New York Post-Graduate School in 1912. 
Since 1905 he has had a busy practice at Topeka and 
is specializing in the treatment of the eye, ear and 
throat. Doctor Hildebrand is a member of the 
County, State, Tri-State and American Medical 
Associations. 

November 26, 1902, he married Miss Edith M. 
Robbins. They have one daughter, Nedra L., born 
November 26, 1909. The family are members of the 
Lutheran Church. Doctor Hildebrand is affiliated 
with Topeka Lodge of Masons, the Ligonier Chapter 
and Council, and is a republican in politics. He and 
his family reside in a modern home completed in 
19 1 2. Doctor Hildebrand is a stockholder in the 
State Bank of Topeka. For two years he was a 
member of the Town Council. He accepted that 
post of responsibility largely in order to push the 
movement for the installing of a waterworks and 
electric light system, a valuable improvement brought 
about while he was a member of the Council. 

William A. Cook, partner and business associate 
with his son-in-law, Charles E, Lingle, conducting 
the leading hardware business at Hamilton, is a man 
■of wide experience and has been engaged in farm- 
ing and business affairs for over forty years. 

He was born in Crawford County, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 7, 1854, son of George and Catherine (Young) 
Cook and grandson of George Cook, Sr., a native 
of Germany who came to America when a young 
man and located on a farm in Pennsylvania. George 
Cook, Jr., a native of Pennsylvania, moved to Craw- 
ford (lounty, Ohio, in the early fifties and spent 
the rest of his life there as a farmer. His wife, 
Catherine Young, died in 1855, <lie mother of ten 
children : David, George, Mary, Sarah and Andrew, 
both of whom died young, Samuel, Frederick, 
Rachel, Elizabeth and William A. 

William A. Cook was only seve_n months old when 
his mother died. His father later married Mrs. 
Rebecca Ronk. William A. Cook grew up in the 
home of his stepmother and has for her memory 
only praise and gratitude, since she was in every 
respect a good and kind mother to him. He attended 
school in Crawford County, did some farming in 
Whetstone Township of that county, and in early 
manhood married Lottie Beck, daughter of Adam 
and Sarah Beck. About four years after his mar- 
riage he moved to Williams County, Ohio, and con- 
tinued farming there for a number of years. He 
then engaged in business, and coming to Hamilton, 
Indiana, he and his son-in-law. Charles E. Lingle, 
bought the general hardware business which has 
since been conducted and has prospered under their 
management. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cook have one child, lola, wife of 
Charles E. Lingle. 

Charles E. Lingle is one of the enterprising 
young merchants of Steuben County, and active 
head of the leading hardware business at Hamilton. 
He spent most of his life over the Ohio state line in 
Williams County and was born there at Evansport, 
February 12, 1880, a son of Benjamin and Fannie 
(Eagle) Lingle, both natives of Williams County. 
His father was a farmer. Charles E. Lingle was 
one of twin brothers, William and Charles. He 
attended public school in his native county, and at 
the beginning of his independent career went to 
Flint, Michigan, and spent four years in the Durant 
and Dort carriage factory, which has since become 
an important auxiliary of the great automobile in- 
dustry at Flint. He then returned to his native 
county, locating at Edon, and in 1905 bought the 
hardware business at Hamilton, Indiana, and has 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



conducted a flourishing enterprise there. His busi- 
ness associate and partner is his father-in-law, 
William A. Cook. 

Mr. Lingle married in November, 1903, lola Cook, 
daughter of W. A. and Lottie Cook. They have 
two children, Raymond and Isabel. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lingle are members of the Methodist Church. 

Peter J. Miller is a hard working, industrious 
and upright citizen of Clear Spring Township in 
LaGrange County, diligently working his home farm 
in section 10, in the same community where he was 
born and reared. 

Mr. Miller was born March 10, 1872, a son of 
Jacob J. and'Mattie (Nisley) Miller, the former a 
native of Holmes County, Ohio. The grandfather, 
Joni Miller, was born in Pennsylvania, from there 
came to Ohio, later came to Indiana, and died in 
LaGrange County, Joni Miller had sixteen chil- 
dren, named Jacob J., Christ, Jeremiah, Joni. Joseph, 
Emanuel, Samuel, John, Mattie, Anne, Lizzie and 
five others that died in infancy. In the family of 
Jacob J. Miller were eleven children, ten of whom 
are living today, named, John, Anna, Joni, Peter J., 
Susie, Lydia, Fannie, Eli, Noah and Jacob. 

Peter J. Miller spent his boyhood on a farm in 
the same section as that in which his present home 
is located. He attended the district schools, and 
when not in school worked on the home farm until 
he was twenty-one years of age. December 3, 1892, 
he married Elizabeth Miller, who was born on the 
farm where she now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
attended the same school. Since their marriage they 
have lived in Clear Spring and Newbury townships 
and have occupied their present well situated and 
valuable farm of 120 acres since February 19, 1901. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have four children : Emanuel, 
who married Lizzie Yoder and lives in Clear Spring 
Township ; Lydia, who is the wife of V. V. Lam- 
bright ; and Amandus and Joni, unmarried and at 
home. The family are members of the Amish 
Mennonite Church. 

Frank B. Phillips. The membership of the Phil- 
lips family in Steuben County comprises a number 
of very successful farmers, good citizens and people 
of all around worth and ability. One of them is 
Frank B. Phillips, who was born in that county, and 
is successfully identified with the ownership and 
management of a good farm in Salem Township. 

He was born in Jackson Township January 31, 
1864, a son of Addison and Elizabeth (Wade) Phil- 
lips. His mother was a native of Canada, a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Jane (Giles) Wade, a family that 
came in early times to LaGrange County, Indiana. 
Addison Phillips was born in New York" State Oc- 
tober 21, 1821, and as a young man worked on the 
Erie Canal. In early manhood he came to Steuben 
County, and arrived here practically penniless and 
worked out by the month on a farm. Later his par- 
ents came on and settled at Hamilton, where both of 
them now rest in the cemetery. Addison Phillips 
eventually settled in Jackson Township, where he 
acquired 103 acres of new land. A log cabin stood 
on the ground, but otherwise there were few im- 
provements worthy of the name. He kept up the 
work diligently for many years, and before his 
death had good buildings and a farm thoroughly 
productive. His wife died on the old farm Decem- 
ber 29, 1887, and he died there in 1899. He was very 
independent in politics, voting as a republican, also 
as a greenbacker, and was a supporter of Bryan 
during his first presidential campaign. Addison 
Phillips and wife had a large family of children, 
namely: Rollin, born December 16, 1854; Rebecca, 



born March 19, 1856, deceased; Ellen, born Sep- 
tember 24, 1857; Ida Isabel, born August 14, 1859; 
Otis E, born September 20, 1861, deceased; Frank; 
Charles, born January 29, 1866; Adelbert, born De- 
cember 28, 1868; Mary Elizabeth, born September 
20, 1871 ; Anna Lorene, born October 15, 1873, de- 
ceased ; and Jay W., born March 14, 1877, who died 
in infancy. 

Frank B. Phillips grew up on his father's home- 
stead and after getting his education worked at 
what has been the chief business of his life. For 
three years he rented and then in 1890 bought eighty 
acres in Jackson Township. That was his home 
until igoi. He sold his place in February of that 
year and on April 3, 1901, bought his present home 
farm in Salem Township. He has done much to in- 
crease the value of his 160 acres, erecting good 
buildings, and otherwise keeping his place in per- 
fect order and in a high degree of productiveness. 
Mr. Phillips is a democrat in politics, is a member 
of the Lodge and Encampment of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Salem Center, and is also 
affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He and his wife have their church affiliations with 
the Latter Day Saints. 

On January 27, 1887, he married Louetta Cham- 
berlain. She was born in Tippecanoe County, In- 
diana, in 1864, daughter of Sherman and Mary 
(Jones) Chamberlain. Her father was born at Hud- 
son in Summit County, Ohio, and her mother in 
the State of New York. Her father died in Noble 
County, Indiana, in 1877, at the age of fifty-four 
and her mother in 1905, aged seventy-four. 

Charles Alfred Phillips, a well known Steuben 
County farmer, whose home is just across the road 
from his brother Frank, was born in Jackson Town- 
ship January 29, 1866. 

He received a public school education and has 
been a farmer since early manhood. He has made 
progress slowly but steadily, beginning with a pur- 
chase of twenty acres of the old homestead. He 
also inherited twenty acres, and finally had a farm 
of fifty-seven acres in Jackson Township. He sold 
that and went to Noble County and bought seventy 
acres, but after two years found employment at Ken- 
dallville with the Raber and Lang Cement Tile 
Works. In 191 5 he acquired eighty acres in Salem 
Township, and since then has been a successful 
farmer and stock man. He is a democrat in politics 
and his wife attends the Evangelical Church. 

In January, 189S, he married Miss Lillie Smith, of 
DeKalb County, Indiana, daughter of John Smith. 
They have one son, Claud, born November 3, 1896, in 
Jackson Township. He was educated in the public 
schools and married Delcia Meeks, of Jackson 
Township. They have a daughter, Arlene, and a 
son, Ned. 

Aaron M. Carr. One of the fine farms longest 
under one continuous ownership and management in 
DeKalb is the William Carr farm, two miles south 
of Auburn. 

Its original settler, William Carr, is still living 
there, at the venerable age of eighty-seven. The re- 
sponsible head of the farming business for many 
years has been his son, Aaron M. Carr. 

The latter was born on this farm October 2, 1868, 
and is a son of William and Fannie (Shuger) Carr. 
William Carr was born in Richland County, Ohio, 
June 2, 1832, and was brought to DeKalb County in 
1839. He grew up in a pioneer environment, and 
began the improvement of the land comprised in 
his present farm in 1859. He is the oldest member 
of the Auburn Lodge of Masons and is a democrat 
in politics. His wife died in 1872, and of their six 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



children three are living: Margaret, widow of 
David Dulany; Nora, wife of Miles Osbiui, living 
in Spokane, Washington, and Aaron M. 

Aaron M. Carr grew up on the home farm and 
was educated in the common schools. November 
25, 1899, he married Anna Strebe. She was born 
at Auburn March 14, 1871, and was educated in the 
common schools. They have three sons : William 
F., the oldest, attended the Auburn High School 
two years and married Florence Antrup, who lives 
in Jackson Township, and Walter A., and George 
A. have both completed the work of the common 
schools. 

Aaron M. Carr is affiliated with Auburn Lodge 
No. 191 of the Knights of Pythias, and Lodge No. 
566 of the Loyal Order of Moose. He is quite 
active in the democratic party. Mr. Carr with the 
aid of his sons operates his farm of two hundred 
acres and handles good livestock of all kinds. 

Elizarrth Roush. No one can tell more of the 
events and personalities of Washington Township 
in Noble County than Mrs. Elizabeth Roush, who 
continuously since birth, a period of seventy years, 
has lived in one locality on the banks of the Tip- 
pecanoe River, where her father settled in pioneer 
times and established an institution widely known 
for years under the name Rider's Mills. 

Mrs. Roush is the widow of the late Alfred 
Roush, who was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 
April, 1849. When he was a boy his parents moved 
to Noble County, Indiana, and he grew up there 
and on December 2, 1868, he and Elizabeth Rider 
were married. She was born on the farm where she 
now resides September 23, 1849, and is a daughter 
of Jacob and Hannah (Keister) Rider. Her father 
was a native of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 
where he was born October 11, 1S13, and lived to 
the venerable age of ninety-seven. When he was 
twelve years old his parents moved to Ohio, and 
after his marriage he came to Noble County, In- 
diana, in 1845. At that time he located on the land 
which Mrs. Roush now owns. He acquired about 
800 acres along the Tippecanoe River. At that time 
it was covered with heavy timber, and Mr. Rider 
had to clear away a space on which to erect his log 
cabin home. In that one locality he spent the rest 
of his years. He built his grist mill about 1854, and 
it was the favorite grinding place for farmers in the 
neighborhood for nearly half a century. He had 
learned the miller's trade in boyhood. In order to 
dispose of the timber from hfs land he also con- 
ducted a sawmill and a shingle mill, and in many 
other ways distinguished himself as a man of great 
enterprise. He was equally well known for his 
honest and upright character. In politics he was a 
democrat. Jacob Rider and wife had ten children, 
but only two are now living, Mrs. Elizabeth Roush 
and Mrs. Nancy Wilson. 

Mrs. Roush had the privilege of attending an old 
log schoolhouse when she was a girl and later she 
herself became a teacher in the community. She is 
a member of the Evangelical Church, of which her 
husband was an active supporter. Alfred Roush 
was a democrat but later became aligned with the 
prohibition cause. Mrs. Roush owns .wo acres of 
land, 155 acres of which is included in the old Rider 
estate. ' She is also a stockholder in the North 
Webster State Bank and is executrix of the Roush 
estate. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Roush had nine children, 
and the four now living are : Harry, unmarried and 
at home with his mother: Alvin R., who married 
Orra Seymour ; Nellie, a high school graduate and 
a former teacher, now the wife of A. D. Wilkin- 



son ; and R. W., who operates his mother's home 
farm. 

Harrv L. Taylor, of Fremont, is proprietor of 
the largest and finest equipped garage in Steuben 
County. He has been in the automobile business 
for a number of years and prior to that was asso- 
ciated with his father in an extensive livestock 
shipping business with headquarters at Fremont. 
The Taylor family is an old one in Northeast In- 
diana, and several of its members are mentioned 
in this publication. 

Harry L. Taylor is a son of John H. and Alice 
S. (Thomas) Taylor, and a grandson of Linus S. 
Taylor. Linus Taylor was born in Cuyahoga 
County. Ohio, near. the city of Cleveland, in 1830. 
John Taylor was born in York Township of Steu- 
ben County November 7, 1858, attended the public 
schools in his native locality, also the college at 
Angola, and as a young man followed teaching as 
well as farming. In 1880 he married Alice Thomas, 
daughter of Richard and Minerva (Townsend) 
Thomas, and immediately after their marriage they 
pioneered to northern Kansas and tried farming 
in that state for about two years. Returning to 
Steuben County and locating in York Township, 
John Taylor moved from there in 1886 to Fremont, 
and has been a resident of that city for over thirty 
years. He has become widely known all over this 
section of the state as a livestock buyer, and is the 
oldest man in that business in the county. He still 
deals in all kinds of livestock except horses. He 
is a Scottish Rite and Knight Templar Mason, and 
a member of the Mystic Shrine. John Taylor and 
wife had two children: Harry L. and Berle E. 
The latter is in the oil business with headquarters 
at Fort Worth, Texas. 

Harry L. Taylor was born in Smith County, 
Kansas, January 4, 1881. but has no memory of 
the state of his birth. He has lived in Fremont 
since 1886, and after finishing the high school 
course there became associated with his father in 
the livestock shipping business. In 1013. in con- 
nection with livestock, he also engaged in the auto- 
mobile business, and since 1917 has given all his 
time to that work. In 191 7 he built his garage, 
which is a building 60 by 130 feet, modern in every 
respect, including a vacuum vapor system of heat- 
ing. 

Mr. Taylor is a republican in politics and was 
a member of the Town Council of Fremont four 
vears. He is affiliated with Northeastern Lodge 
No. 2T0, Free and Accepted Masons, with the Chap- 
ter, Council and Commandery and with the Mystic 
Shrine at Fort Wayne. He is a member of the 
Elks Lodge at Coldwatcr, Michigan. His wife is 
a member of the Methodist Church and the family 
attend worship there. January 14, 1905, Mr. Taylor 
married Miss ]\faud E. Stroh. of Jamestown Town- 
ship. Steuben County. They have one son, Percy 
Barre, born April 23, 1906. 

Fraxk Hughes, a former clerk of the Circuit 
Court of Steuben County and now a member of the 
Indiana State Tax Board, in the inheritance tax de- 
partment, has had a very busy and useful career. 
In early life he was a successful teacher, but for 
the past twenty years has given his time chiefly to 
farming in Salem Township, where he still lives. 

Mr. Hughes was born in that township September 
3, 1866, a son of John and Martha (Meek) Hughes. 
His parents were both born in Ohio. His grand- 
father, David Hughes, was a pioneer settler in 
Salem Township, and kept a store at Dutch Mills 



64 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Corners. He also served as justice of the peace at 
Flint for a number of years, and died there. His 
children included: Lafayette; James, who died as 
a Union soldier; Eliza; Mary, widow of Luther 
Hill ; Alice ; and Nancy. 

John Hughes grew up and received his education 
in the public schools of Steuben County, and for a 
number of years was employed in a saw mill at 
Dutch Mills Corners. He spent nearly all his life 
in that township and died in 1893, at the age of 
fifty-five. He was a republican in politics and a 
member of the Reformed Lutheran Church. His 
widow, who died in October, 1918, at the age of sev- 
enty-two, was the mother of twelve children, named 
Alonzo, Frank, Lester, Lewis, Emma, Sumner, Jo- 
sephine, Porter, Rachel, Earl and Burl, twins, and 
James, who died at the age of twelve years. 

Frank Hughes in addition to the advantages 
afforded by the local district schools attended the 
American Normal School at Logansport, Indiana, 
also the Tri-State Normal College at Angola and 
the State Normal School at Terre Haute. He was 
only a boy when he taught his first term of school 
at Helmer, and was employed there for a second 
term. After that he followed teaching twenty years 
and for nine years was connected with the schools 
of Salem Township. The summer seasons he was 
engaged in farming and about 1897 he bought a farm 
in Salem Township of seventy acres. Later he 
bought another ten acres and then forty acres, 
giving him his present well proportioned farm of 
120 acres, improved with two sets of buildings. 

Li 191 1 Mr. Hughes left his farm and went to 
Angola to perform his duties as clerk of the Cir- 
cuit Court. He was elected to that office in 1910, 
and held it four years. He then remained in the 
office as deputy for two and a half years. Since then 
his public duties have been as a member of the 
state ta.x board. He is a republican and a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Salem 
Center, while he and his wife are active members 
of the Presbyterian Church of Salem Township. 

March 27, igoi, Mr. Hughes married Miss Leona 
E. Parsell. She was born in Jackson Township Sep- 
tember 8, 1879, a daughter of Austin M. and Mary 
Adaline (Weicht) Parsell. Her mother is a sister 
of Eugene F. Weicht, of Steuben County. Austin 
Parsell and wife live in Jackson Township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hughes have one daughter, Martha Ada- 
line, born March 21, 1905. She graduated from the 
eighth grade of the common schools in 1919. 

Jacob W. Jennings. When the people of Troy 
Township, DeKalb County, chose Jacob W. Jen- 
nings as trustee in 1918 it was as a tribute of ap- 
preciation of his good business qualities and the 
energy he has displayed as a farmer, and was also 
an honor bestowed upon a family of long and prom- 
inent standing in that part of DeKalb County. 

His grandtather was Peter Jennings, who settled 
in Troy Township in 1843. Peter Jennings was 
born m New Jersey September 13, 1802, a son of 
Peter, a native of the same county and of English 
descent. In 1821 Peter Jennings moved with his 
parents to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and from 
there came to DeKalb County in 1843. He settled 
in section 29, and had to clear away some of the 
heavy timber before he could build his log cabin. 
Eventually he acquired a good farm of over 200 
acres. In 1829 he married Catherine Rainsberger, 
a daughter of John Rainsberger. She died in 1881 
and he lived to be past fourscore. His children 
were Elizabeth, John, Isaac, William, George, 
Phoebe and Abraham. 

William Jennings, father of Jacob W., was born 
in Carroll County, Ohio, October I4, 1835, and 



was eight years old when the family drove their 
ox and horse teams across the country to DeKalb 
County. He had a useful part in clearing up the 
old homestead, and in i860 he settled on a farm of 
his own in section 21 and for many years was a 
general farmer, and he also specialized in Merino 
sheep for wool purposes. In 1859 he married Anna 
McCord, daughter of David McCord, who settled in 
Steuben County, Indiana, in 1840. Mrs. Anna Jen- 
"'"gs died in 1918. She was the mother of five 
children, four of whom are still living- H S Jen- 
nings, of Corning, Iowa; Olive, unmarried and at 
home; Eldora, wife of D. E. McClellan, of Will- 
iams County, Ohio, and Jacob W. 

Jacob W. Jennings was born in Troy Town- 
ship January 12. 1875, grew up on the home farm 
and attended district school No. 4. On March 7 
1897, he married Ruby Skelton, who was born in 
• 7.r-n°^"^^.!P- '^^'*^'' '•'«^''' marriage they lived 
in Williams County, Ohio, four years, lived for 
eighteen months on his father's homestead, and 
since then have occupied their present farm, com- 
prising eighty acres with good improvements. Mr 
and Mrs. Jennings have had two children, Glenn 

I ."^ J^"^^ '^^ '905, a student in the public 
schools, and Chester H., who died aged fifteen 

Mr Jennings is affiliated with Butler Lodge No 
158, Knights of Pythias. He is a republican in 
politics and served four years as a member of the 
iownship Advisory Board before his election to the 
office of township trustee November 5 1918 He 
IS a stockholder in the Cooperative Association. 

Charles A. Werker. Farm management and the 
business of farming generally have found a man of 
unusual enterprise in the person of Charles A 
Werker, whose home is two and a half miles south- 
west of Kimmell. While Mr. Werker is member of 
one of the oldest families of Noble County, his own 
career has been a direct product of his individual 
energies and capabilities, and his reputation shows 
that he has made good in every particular. 

He was born in Sparta Township, September 22 
1874, son of Yangulph and Clara (Schlabach) 
Werker. \angulph Werker, who was born in Ger- 
many, July 4, 1847, was only five years old when 
brought to the United States by his parents. They 
settled in Stark County, Ohio, and he grew up there, 
receiving a common school education. At the age 
of nineteen he came to Indiana, settling in Allen 
County, then moved to Noble County, in Washing- 
ton Township. He married Clara Schlabach in 1872. 
She was born in Ohio, and came to Noble County 
at the age of five years, Yangulph Werker after his 
marriage settled on a farm in Sparta Township, 
and was a prominent farmer in that locality for 
many years, but is now living retired in Cromwell. 
He is a democrat, and has never sought any official 
honors. He and his wife have seven children, 
named Charles A., William E., Melvin L Wallace 
O., John v., Orlo R. and Harvey R. 

Charles A. Werker had a good preparation for 
life while living on the home farm. This was the 
result not only of attendance at the district schools 
but a wise use of his opportunities to learn farming 
in a practical fashion. At the age of twenty-one he 
started out on his own account. In 1899 he married 
Myrta M. Earnhart, who is a native of Sparta 
Township and is a woman of good education, having 
attended both the common and high schools. 

Since his marriage Mr. Werker has been farming 
in Sparta Township and now has 390 acres under his 
direct management. He also owns 235 acres in 
Ohio, and is therefore one of the larger land own- 
ers. He has done an extensive business outside his 




^,^,A^S^^^. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



65 



farm in the buying, feeding and selling of livestock. 
He is secretary of the Kimmell Cooperative Ship- 
pers' Association and is one of the directors of the 
State Bank of Kimmell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Werker have three children : Coral, 
born October 2y, 1902, now a student in the public 
schools ; Kenton E., born February 27, 1904, also a 
schoolboy; and Charles A., Jr., born December 13, 
1908. The family are members of the Sparta Chris- 
tian Church. Mr. Werker is affiliated with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and is a past grand 
of Kimmell Lodge. Politically he is a democrat. 

Elza M. Huntsm.\n, present trustee of Noble 
Township, has for many years been successfully 
identified with farming and stock raising in Noble 
County, and is proprietor of the Lakeside Farm, 
comprising sixty-six acres in Noble Township. 

Mr. Huntsman was born in Greene Township of 
the same county October 6, 1869, a son of George 
and Susannah (Hosier) Huntsman. His father, who 
was born in Morrow County, Ohio, August 11, 1837, 
grew up and married there, his wife being also a 
native of Ohio. They were married in 1861, and in 
1864 moved to Indiana, locating in Greene Township 
of Noble County, where the father spent the rest of 
his life as an industrious and progressive farmer. 
He was a member of the Burr Oak Baptist Church, 
with which his wife was also affiliated. She died 
January 21, 1904. Of their nine children five are 
still living: Elza M. ; Alice, wife of D. A. Harlan; 
William H., a farmer in Greene Township; Cora, 
wife of Vernon Strouse ; and Anson, a Greene 
Township farmer. 

Elza M. Huntsman spent the first twenty-one 
years of his life on his father's farm, and during 
that time acquired a good common school education. 
Since then he has been a farmer on his own account 
and for about four years he operated a threshing 
outfit over a large part of Noble County. 

April 26, 1890, he married Mertuss V. Wine- 
brenner, who was born in Noble Township, July 16, 
1868, was reared there and attended the district 
schools. She is a daughter of James E. and Eliza- 
beth (Rivir) Winebrenner. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Huntsman worked his father's farm for a 
time and later bought forty acres in Greene Town- 
ship, selling that to secure their present larger place 
in Noble Township, and finally made the move which 
brought them to their present farm, widely known 
as Lakeside Farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huntsman have five children : Flossie 
F. is a graduate of the common schools and is the 
wife of Wallace Edsel. Bernice L. is the wife of 
Clarence Alawhorter. Beulah E. is a graduate of 
the Wolf Lake High School and is the wife of Ted 
Hile. Verlin B. is a farmer, and married Marie 
Brackney. Ruby, the youngest of the family, is still 
in the home circle. Mr. and Mrs. Huntsman are 
members of the Burr Oak Baptist Church and he is 
one of the trustees. He was elected on the demo- 
cratic ticket to his present office as trustee of Noble 
Township bv a majority of fifty votes. Normally 
the township" has a republican margin of twenty-five, 
but his personal popularity succeeded in overcoming 
this handicap. 

Elmer Rittkr. The Ritter family has been identi- 
fied with Steuben County over sixty-five years. 
Elmer Ritter, who was born and reared in this 
county, has been in business at Fremont for a num- 
ber of years and is the present postmaster of that 
citv. 

He was born in Steuben Township of Steuben 
County August 10, 1867. His father, Philip Ritter, 

Vol. II— 5 



was born in Union County, Pennsylvania, in 1820. 
a son of John Ritter, who soon after the birth of 
this son moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and later 
to Ashland County in that state. Philip Ritter 
learned the trade of carpenter, and in July, 1852, 
he settled in section 6 of Steuben Township. He 
bought 128 acres of heavily timbered land, and built 
his house of hewn logs the same spring. In 1868 
he constructed a more commodious residence, and 
his success as a farmer gave him a place of nearly 
200 acres, most of which was improved under his 
direct management and supervision. He continued 
to work at his trade as a carpenter and was also 
an undertaker in his locality for nearly half a cen- 
tury. He was a member of the United Brethren 
Church. 

Philip Ritter married for his first wife Lucy Ann 
Kope, who died in 1854, the mother of three chil- 
dren, Henry, Mary and Jacob. Philip Ritter mar- 
ried for his second wife Martha (Gillander) An- 
derson, who was born in the north of Ireland. Of 
their eight children six are still living, named 
Martha, Barbara, Theophilus, Lavina, Elmer and 
Orpha. 

Elmer Ritter grew up on the old homestead in 
Steuben Township, attended the local schools there, 
and on moving to Fremont he engaged in the dray- 
ing business for five years, also sold meat for seven 
years and then resumed farming for three years. 
He was appointed to his present duties and respon- 
sibilities as postmaster of Fremont May 15, 1916, 
and has given a most gratifying administration of 
his office. 

Mr. Ritter is a staunch democrat and served one 
term as a member of the City Council of Fremont. 
He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his 
family are members of the Methodist Church. In 
1889 he married Miss Jennie Saul, of Steuben 
County. Of their two children a daughter died in 
infancy and the son, Saul C, was born January 8, 
1892. The son was educated in the public schools 
of Fremont and on April 26. 1918. joined the army, 
being assigned on account of his previous expe- 
rience to the postoffice department and was located 
at Camp Taylor, Kentucky. He has recently re- 
turned from service and is now assistant postmaster 
at Fremont, Indiana. 

John B. Stumpf during his early years was a man 
of tremendous vigor and industry, and literally with 
the work of his hands laid the foundation for the 
prosperity he enjoyed as one of the leading farmers 
of Salem Township in Steuben County. He has 
been a resident of Steuben County more than forty 
years. 

Mr. Stumpf was born in Seneca County, Ohio, 
February 22, 1852, a son of George Michael and 
Elizabeth (Breacht) Stumpf. His parents were 
both natives of Germany. His father was 
born in 1812, the son of George and Margaret 
Stumpf, the former of whom died in Ger- 
many. George Michael came to America with 
his widowed mother, who lived in Ohio and died in 
Upper Sandusky at the age of ninety-eight. The 
son was married in Seneca County, Ohio, and in 
1855 moved to Putnam County of that state. He 
died at Upper Sandusky in 1893, at the age of 
eighty-two. His wife came to this country with her 
parents, who also settled in Ohio. She died in 
Steuben County in 1884, when about sixty-four years 
of age. She was the mother of nine children: Rosa, 
Magdalena and Caroline, all deceased; John B., 
Mary, Sophronia, Frances, Catherine and Tina, who 
is also deceased. 



66, 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



John B. Stumpf grew up in Putnam County, Ohio, 
until he was seventeen years old. He then spent 
some time in the West and in 1875 located in Steuben 
County, where he worked by the day or by the job 
and for a number of employers. During that period 
of his life he grubbed out 200 acres with a grub 
hoe, and it was not unusual for him in the fall of 
the year to cut 100 shocks of corn a day. Such in- 
dustry inevitably had its reward. He began as a 
renter and in 1877 bought fifty-five acres where he 
is living today in Salem Township. He now has a 
well proportioned farm of eighty-two acres, im- 
proved with good buildings, and it has furnished 
him a living and more during the forty years he 
has lived there. Mr. Stumpf is a democrat in poli- 
tics. 

In 1875 he married Miss Sarah Tubbs, whose home 
was in Steuben County, two and a half miles east 
of Salem Center. She is a daughter of Leroy and 
Rosa Jane Tubbs, both early settlers in Steuben 
County. Her father chopped a place in the woods 
to build his log cabin in Salem Township, east of 
Dutch sawmill, and had a good farm of eighty 
acres there. He died when still in the prime of life, 
but his widow survived until 1915, at the age of 
eighty-nine. Mr. and Mrs. Tubbs were members 
of the United Brethren Church, Which Mr. and Mrs. 
Stumpf also attended. In the Tubbs family were 
five children, named Elizabeth, Emaline, Ira, Frank 
and Sarah. 

_ Mr. and Mrs. Stumpf had five children. Ira mar- 
ried Pearl Middow, and their four children are 
Roy, Charles, Robert (deceased), and Glena. Mary 
Evadell is the wife of Raymond Barnett, lives at 
Kendallville and has a daughter, Ruth. Willie, the 
third child, is deceased. Alvah Eugene married 
Bertha Harvey and has a daughter, Marjorie Chris- 
tina. Ethel is seventeen years old. 

E. F. TiNNEY. The two most strongly marked char- 
acteristics of both the East and the West are com- 
bined in the residents of the section of country of 
which this volume treats. The enthusiastic enter- 
prise which over-leaps all obstacles and makes pos- 
sible almost any undertaking in the comparatively 
new and vigorous western states is here tempered 
by the stable and more careful policy that we have 
borrowed from our eastern neighbors, and the 
combination is one of peculiar force and power. 
It has been the means of placing this section of the 
country on a par with the older East, at the same 
time producing a reliability and certainty in business 
affairs which is sometimes lacking in the West. 
This happy combination of characteristics is pos- 
sessed by the subject of this brief sketch, E. F. 
Tinney, secretary and manager of the Butler Basket 
Company at Butler, DeKalb County, and who is 
assuming a deservedly high place in the business 
circles of that community. 

E. F. Tinney was born at Ypsilanti, Michigan, on 
June 12. 1876. and is the son of James D. and 
Lottie (Sharp) Tinney, who are now residents of 
Tucson, Arizona. The youthful days of E. F. 
Tinney were spent in Pontiac. Michigan, where he 
received a common school education. He supple- 
mented this training by two correspondence courses 
and attended and graduated from business college. 
He then took a course in drafting, for which he 
had a natural aptitude, and for a time followed that 
line of work in a jobbing shop. He had a strong 
liking for machinery, in the handling of which he 
becarne an ex-pert, and eventually was appointed 
superintendent of a carriage manufactory in Butler, 
with which he was identified until 19T7. On July I, 
191 1, Mr. Tinney bought the controlling interest in 
the Butler Basket Company, one of the live and 



prosperous concerns of that city. The company is 
mcorporated and the official personnel is as follows : 
President, E. C. Miller ; vice president, Jesse Ober- 
lin; treasurer, L. C. Harding; secretary and manager, 
E. F. Tinney; directors, in addition to the fore- 
going officers. Dr. A. A. Kramer and Walter J. 
Mondhank. Though but a comparatively recent 
comer to Butler, Mr. Tinney has made a favorable 
impression on the community and is identified with 
every movement for the advancement of the best 
interests of his town and county. 

In February, i8g8, Mr. Tinney was married to 
Jennie C. Capman, also a native of Michigan. Mrs. 
Tinney after completing the high school course at- 
tended a business college. To Mr. and Mrs. Tinney 
have been born three children, namely : Homer C, 
who is a high school graduate, was a participant 
in the World war, having served two years in 
France as an observer in the One Hundred and 
First Aviation Squadron, and Ruth and Margaret 
are students in the common schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tinney are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, of the official board of which 
Mr. Tinney is a member. Politically he supports 
the republican party and takes an intelligent inter- 
est in the trend of public events. His record is 
that of a man who by his own imaided efforts 
worked his way from a modest beginning to a posi- 
tion of influence in the business world. 

Eugene Sharp. In the scheme of local govern- 
ment provided for Indiana counties one of the most 
important offices is that of township trustee. Prob- 
ably more care is taken to select men properly 
qualified to fill it, and the place is at once one of 
great responsibility and honor. 

The present trustee of York Township, Steuben 
County, is Eugene Sharp, who is now in his second 
elected term. Mr. Sharp is a native of Steuben 
County, and has been known to his fellow citizens 
as a capable farmer, merchant and business man. 
He was born in Richland Township, July 7, 1864, 
son of Mortimer and Olive (Jackman) Sharp. His 
mother was born in Otsego Township of Steuben 
County, a daughter of Richard and Orilia (Aldrich) 
Jackman, numbered among the pioneer settlers. 
Isaac Sharp, grandfather of Eugene Sharp, was a 
native of New York, and for many years lived at 
Syracuse and managed the salt works at Liverpool. 
He married Melinda Schoville, and about 1852 came 
to Indiana and settled in Richland To\ynship, where 
he acquired eighty acres of heavily timbered land. 
He had partially cleared this and improved it with 
buildings before he died five or six years later. His 
children were George, Adaline, Martha. Mary, Mor- 
timer and Volney. Volney died in childhood. 

Mortimer Sharp, who was born at Syracuse, New 
York, was educated in the schools of his native city 
and also in Richland Township, where he first put 
his youthful strength to test as a farmer. In 1865 
he moved to Smithfield Township of DeKalb Coun- 
ty, ran a farm there five years, after which he 
bought the old homestead in Richland Township, 
and lived on it until his death, September 11, 1880. 
His first wife died in 1872, the mother of two chil- 
dren, Eugene and Clyde F. He then married Amina 
Patterson, and had one other child, Eva. He was 
a member of the Methodist Church. 

Eugene Sharp made good use of his early ad- 
vantages in the schools of Otsego Township and at 
Angola, and put his knowledge to work teaching 
school for two terms. He farmed the home place 



years, 



a farm west of Hamilton in Otsego 



Township three years, and for three years was_ a 
general merchant at Hamilton. His business train- 
ing was supplemented by thirteen months in the 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



67 



grocery department of a department store at 
Angola, after which he returned to his farm in 
Otsego Township, and was busily engaged in its 
management for eight years. From there he be- 
came a resident of York Township by the purchase 
of a place of 120 acres. He raised ten successive 
crops on this land, and then retired and moved to 
Metz, where his home is today. 

Air. Sharp was first honored with the responsibili- 
ties of his present office in October, 1913, when ap- 
pointed to fill a vacancy. He served a year and 
three months by appointment. In the meantime, in 
the fall of lOM. he was regularly elected trustee' 
and four years later came another recognition of 
the adequacy of his work wlien he was re-elected. 
Mr. Sharp has filled all the offices in the Knights 
of Pythias Lodge at Hamilton and has been a 
member of the Grand Lodge. 

October 27, 18S7, he married Miss Lillie A. Swift, 
daughter of Oscar F. and Dema A. (Ball) Swift. 
Their children are three in number : Guy B., Audra 
L. and Olive. 

Joseph W. Goodwin is one of the most extensive 
land owners and lumber men in northern Indiana. 
He has been identified with farming and lumbering 
the greater part of his active life, covering a period 
of over forty years. 

Mr. Goodwin, whose home is in Fremont, was 
born in Ashland County, Ohio. October 18, 1853, 
son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Good) Goodwin. 
His parents were natives of Pennsylvania, his fa- 
ther born in 1817 and his mother in 1820. In May, 
1854. the family came from Ohio and settled on 
a farm a mile west of Waterloo. Indiana, where 
Samuel Goodwin spent the rest of his days. He 
died in 1889 and his wife in 1865. In politics he 
was a whig and later a republican, was a member 
of the Evangelical Church, and finally became iden- 
tified with the United Brethren denomination. He 
had the following children : Ellen, Leander, Lewis 
and Francis, both of whom died in infancy, Joseph 
W., Lucy, widow of Stephen George, a soldier of 
the Civil war, and Alice. Samuel Goodwin mar- 
ried for his second wife Mrs. Mary (Prosser) Bru- 
baker. She died in 1017, at the age of eighty-nine. 
She was the mother of three children, only one of 
whom is now living, Frank, of Cincinnati. 

Joseph W. Goodwin grew up at his father's 
home in Northeast Indiana, attended the public 
schools, and acquired very early in life a practical 
knowledge of both farming and lumbering. For 
many years he has been in the lumber business 
under the name of the Goodwin Lumber Company, 
both as manufacturers and as retailers. The com- 
pany has yards at Fremont and Pleasant Lake. 
Mr. Goodwin owns over 600 acres of land in Steu- 
ben County. Indiana, and in Branch County, Michi- 
gan. He has been useful as a citizen as well as 
in business afifairs, and has lent his influence for 
the promotion of every worthy movement. In poli- 
tics usually a republican, he has frequently voted 
for the prohibition ticket and has always been a 
staunch temperance man. He and his wife are 
members of the United Brethren Church. 

November 13, 1877, Mr. Goodwin married Miss 
Oliva Brown. Her father. Elder Joseph Brown, 
was one of the early preachers of the United Breth- 
ren faith in the North Ohio Conference. Mr. and 
Mrs. Goodwin have five children. Lillian is the 
wife of William Hampton, superintendent of motive 
power in the great steel works at Gary, Indiana. 
Charles, a Young Men's Christian Association 
worker still with the army in France, married Lorain 
Dalmage, of Des Moines, Iowa. Alta, the third 



child, is unmarried. Olic is the wife of Wallace 
Pirrington and is the mother of three children, 
named Wallace, Jr., Joseph and Mary June. War- 
ren, the youngest child, married Louise Powers, and 
has one daughter, Margaret. 

Isaiah Alleshouse came to Northeast Indiana 
when a boy, grew up in LaGrange County, and 
after varied experiences as a farmer in different 
localities, including a trial at homesteading in Ne- 
braska, he has lived for many years and propered 
as a farmer in Salem Township of Steuben County. 

He was born in Holmes County, Ohio, March 
II, 1855, a son of Adam and Rebecca (Lint) -Al- 
leshouse. His parents were natives of the same 
county, were married there, and in 1862 brought 
their family to LaGrange County, buying in Milford 
Township what is now the Cornell farm. They sold 
this land to its present proprietor, Mr. William Cor- 
nell. Their ne.xt purchase was a farm in Spring- 
field Township, and Adam Alleshouse spent his last 
days in Michigan with his son George, where he 
died in 1904, at the age of seventy-eight. His wife 
died in Springfield Township of LaGrange County. 
They were' members of the Reformed Church, and 
in politics he was a republican from the time that 
party was organized. Their children were ; Ben- 
jamin, Isaiah, John, Lucy Ellen and Mary Jane, 
twins; George Washington, and Daniel. 

Isaiah Alleshouse attended the public schools 
of LaGrange County after he was seven years old, 
and in early manhood he made his independent start 
by buying forty acres in Springfield Township. Sell- 
ing that he came to Steuben County, rented the farm 
of his father-in-law two years, and lived in La- 
Grange County two years on his own farm, and 
for two years rented the Newton farm in Greenfield 
Township. After this came his western experience 
in Nebraska, where he took up a forty-acre home- 
stead and went through all the trials and vicissitudes 
of homesteading and farming in the West for eight 
years. Selling out, he returned to Indiana, and has 
since been well contented with the climate, soil and 
opportunities of this section of the state. In Steuben 
County he located on forty acres which Mrs. Alles- 
house had inherited from her parents, and they also 
bought forty-five acres more, giving them the place 
which is still his workshop as a farmer and the home 
where his children have grown up and where he is 
content to pass his declining years. Mr. .Mleshouse 
is a prohibitionist in politics and a member of the 
United Brethren Church. 

August 28, 1881, he married Miss Olive Eleanor 
Ransburg, who was liorn on the farm where she 
IS now living June 8, 1862, a daughter of Leander 
and Harriet (Spangle) Ransberg, the father a na- 
tive of Frederick, Maryland, and the mother of 
Seneca County, Ohio. After their marriage in 
Ohio the parents moved to Steuben County, and her 
father became one of the very prosperous farmers 
of this section, owning 320 acres. He died in Henry 
County, Ohio, in 1904, and the mother of Mrs. 
Alleshouse, who was born in 1833, died January 
2, 1909. Leander Ransburg first married Rachael 
Mithour and had one daughter. Rachael 3. By his 
second wife his children were Chloe, Ella, Edith 
Lewis W. and Olive Eleanor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alleshouse had five children, and 
now have numerous grandchildren. Their youngest 
child, Cecil Dale, died in 1905, aged two years one 
month and two days. The oldest, Charlotte Estella. 
IS the wife of Albert Ulmer, and her children are 
Vivialeen Frances, Wellington W., Kenneth Roy, 
Velma Lucile, Maynard, Gayland, lona Pearl. Law- 
rence and Wilbur. Ottomer Amos Alleshouse mar- 
ried Ulah Woodford, and their children are Russell 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Raymond, Gladys, Dorothy, Gerald W. and Wood- 
ford W. Carl Sherman Alleshouse married Francis 
Courtwright and has four children, Donald J., Rus- 
sell I., Dale Wesley and Berdina Gay. Rollie Roy, 
the youngest of the family now living, was in the 
army about six months during the World war, and 
was assigned to duties as a cook at Camp Taylor, 
Louisville, Kentucky. He married Lovisa Anstett 
and has a son, Burton Rollie. 

Aaron J. Moore. Three generations of the Moore 
family in Wilmington Township have been regis- 
tered stock breeders. As a family they have some 
of the oldest herds of registered stock in the state, 
and the value of their enterprise in raising the 
standards of livestock husbandry is incalculable. 

Aaron D. Moore, grandfather of the present gen- 
eration, had his Durham Shorthorn cattle, Spanish 
Merino sheep and Poland China hogs registered 
in the books of the official associations of those 
breeds. Aaron D. Moore was born in Stark County, 
Ohio, January 17, 1831, son of a shoemaker, and he 
grew up in a home of very modest comforts and 
early had to make his own way in the world. He 
worked as a boatman on an Ohio canal, and in 1854 
came to DeKalb County and settled in the big woods 
of Wilmington Township. He built his log cabin 
and used his skill as a hunter to provide meat for 
his family. It is said that he paid his first taxes 
with hides and furs. Besides clearing a hundred 
sixty acres of his own he helped others to clear 
land and was in every sense a valiant pioneer, and 
had few equals as an axe man. In 1851 he married 
Rebecca J. Caldwell, of Stark County, Ohio. Their 
children to grow up were Hiram M., Margaret A., 
Ella, A. Alvin, George M. and John R. 

A grandson of this veteran stock breeder is Aaron 
J. Moore, who makes a specialty of Shropshire 
sheep and Poland China hogs. He was born in 
Wilmington Township November 24, 1896, and is 
a son of John R. Moore and Cora B. (Shanklin) 
Moore. John R. Moore was born on the farm where 
his son, Aaron J., now resides October 30, 1869, 
and died there December 7, 1918. He continued the 
stock breeding enterprise of his father. His wife 
was born in Defiance County, Ohio, January 3, 
1874, and died February 12, igig. They had three 
children ; Aaron J., Gladys, who died while in high 
school, and John R., Jr., who is a high school grad- 
uate, took normal training in the Tri-State College 
and is a teacher. 

Aaron J. Moore has spent all his life on the home 
farm. He attended high school two years at Water- 
loo and he has done much to continue the family 
tradition and profession as a stockman. He owns 
eighty acres of the old farm and has a herd of 
forty head of Shropshire sheep, all pure bred, the 
herd being headed by A. J. Moore's Best No. 63. 
His big type Poland China hogs also contain some 
of the finest representatives of their class. For 
several years his animals have been exhibited at 
state and county fairs. 

November 18, 1915, Mr. Moore married Estella M. 
Quaintance. They have two children : Phyllis E., 
born September 2, 1916, and Aileen, born February 
12, 1918. Mr. Moore is a member of the Ancient 
Order of Gleaners and a democrat in politics. 

Hugh W. Dirrim is one of the honored veterans 
of the Civil war, has spent most of his life in North- 
east Indiana, and for nearly forty years was a suc- 
cessful farmer of Otsego Township in Steuben 
County. He is now enjoying the comforts of life 
in his home at Hamilton. 

Mr. Dirrim was born in Harrison Township of 
Carroll County, Ohio, April 13, 1837, a son of James 



Dirrim and a grandson of Richard Dirrim. Richard 
Dirrim was born in Delaware, served in the War 
of 1812, and in September, 181 5, moved to Stark 
County, Ohio. James Dirrim was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, August II, 1809, but was reared and educated 
in Stark County, Ohio. In May, 1845, he brought 
his family to Franklin Township of DeKalb County, 
Indiana, and settled on a tract of heavily timbered 
land in section 11. He made a good farm there, and 
spent the rest of his life in that locality. He was 
twice married. April 15, 1835, he married for his 
second wife Hannah Gillespie, a native of Ireland. 
They had a family of eleven children, and several 
of the sons fought in the ranks of the Union army. 
The children were: William, Sarah, Hugh W., 
James, Isaac, Richard, Margaret E., Hannah D., 
Elizabeth Ann, John and Milton. 

Hugh W. Dirrim was about eight years old when 
he came to DeKalb County, and he received his edu- 
cation in the schools there. In November, 1862, 
he enlisted in the Forty-Fourth Indiana Infantry, 
and was in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga 
and several other engagements. He was in the army 
until the close of hostilities in April, 1865. He re- 
turned home to take up farming and in 1873 re- 
moved to Otsego Township of Steuben County, 
where he acquired 133 acres. He developed that 
land, putting on the building improvements, and 
lived there with increasing prosperity for many 
years. In igoi he retired and moved to Hamilton, 
and in 1908 sold his farm. 

He married for his first wife Catherine Spiece, 
daughter of John Spiece. She died in October, 1900, 
the mother of six children, Orlando, Lincoln, Clar- 
ence, Jordan, Nettie and Emma. Nettie is now 
deceased. Mr. Dirrim married for his second wife 
Mary Spiece, sister of his first wife. 

Earl L. Hall has had an active .share in the busi- 
ness affairs of Fremont for a long period of years, 
and has been chiefly identified with the management 
of the local milling interests. He is manager of 
the Hammel Milling Company there, and is widely 
known among the grain raising farmers over a 
large surrounding territory. 

Mr. Hall was born at Fremont, October 6, 1866, a 
son of Joseph H. and Delia (Beach) Hall. His 
father was born in Washington County, New York, 
August 24, 1824, went to Michigan at the age of 
twenty and about ten years later came to Fremont, 
Indiana, where he opened a harness shop and was 
one of the first business men in that town. He 
died April 23, 1904. His first wife was Mary 
Beach, by which union there are two living daugh- 
ters, Effie and Ida. His second wife, Delia Beach, 
was a daughter of Samuel and Irene (Lawrence) 
Beach. They came from New York to Saline, Mich- 
igan, about 1833, and in 1836 settled in Branch 
County, that state, and took up government land 
there. Samuel Beach died there when abo\it forty 
years of age and his wife also died young. Their 
children were named Cephus, Charles, Frank, Wil- 
liam, Edward, Emily, Sarah, Delia and Catherine. 
Samuel Beach served as a justice of the peace in 
three different townships in Michigan, though all 
the time living in the same house. That was due 
to the fact that the county was rapidly settling 
and the large townships were being cut up and 
subdivided. 

Earl L. Hall was reared in Fremont and attended 
the local schools and also worked on the farm 
with his father for nine years. He was also with 
his father in business for a time, afterward was 
engaged in the meat business for about eight years, 
and then engaged in the milling trade, working for 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Otis Hammel. After a year and a lialf he took 
still a difTerent line, the lumber trade, and followed 
that a year and a half. But for the past ten years 
Mr. Hall has been steadily engaged in the manage- 
ment of the Hammel Milling Company at Fremont. 

In politics he is a prohibitionist, though formerly 
a republican. Mr. Hall owns sixteen acres of 
land adjoining the corporation limits of Fremont, 
which is known as a part of the Erastus Farnham 
farm. Mr, Farnham built the Hammel mill, also 
the railroad depot and the house in which Mr. Hall 
and family reside. Mr. Hall is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias and is liberal in his religious 
views. 

October ii, 1903, he married Miss Ida Bailey. 
She was born in Scott Township of Steuben County 
January 4, 1869, a daughter of John and Jane (Dy- 
gert) Bailey. Her father was born in Dauphin 
County, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1830, and her 
mother in Scott Township of Steuben County Feb- 
ruary 6, 1844. Mrs. Hall's maternal grandparents 
were Abraham and Abigail (Barnes) Dygert, who 
came to New York State and were among the ear- 
liest settlers of Steuben County. John Bailey came 
to Steuben County with his parents, Michael and 
Catherine (Weaver) Bailey. John Bailey died Sep- 
tember 30, 1903, and his wife on March 23, 1906. 
They have had two daughters, Lucy and Mrs. Hall. 
Lucy was born December 14, 1866, and died in 
May, 1867. 

Frank T. Dole. The family of Dole has many 
relationships with Steuben County people and affairs. 
Frank T. Dole of Angola is former county treas- 
urer and has been an intelligent and influential factor 
in the business life of the community for over 
thirty years. 

Mr. Dole was born in York Township, Huron 
County, Ohio, June i, 1858, a son of John and 
Susannah (Kirkwood) Dole. His parents arrived 
in Salem Township of Steuben County in the spring 
of 1861 and settled in the midst of the woods where 
the wild deer and wild turkey disported. They 
bought loi acres and improved much of it into 
fields. Later this farm was rented to his son, Lewis 
Dole, and John Dole moved to Hudson, lived there 
six years, was then retired at Salem Center with 
his daughter, Mrs. W. E. Kinsey, and died at the 
Kinsey home in 1907, at the age of eighty-six. His 
wife passed away in 1904, at the age of eighty. John 
Dole was a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Stratton) 
Dole, who also came to Steuben County. They were 
natives of Columbiana County, Ohio. Elizabeth 
Stratton Dole died in 1889, at the venerable age of 
ninety-six years. Her children were John, Hannah, 
Elwood, Mary, Joel and Lewis. John Dole along 
with farming followed the trade of carpenter for 
many years. He was a democrat, served as trus- 
tee of Salem Township several years, and he and 
his wife attended the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Susannah Kirkwood was born in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, of Irish extraction, one of her 
brothers being a native of Ireland. John Dole and 
wife had a family of six children; Frank being the 
youngest. Daniel M. lives at Hudson, Indiana; 
Lewis, who died in 1910, at the age of sixty-two, 
left a widow, Mrs. Kate Ann (Greeno) Dole, now 
a resident of Angola ; the third child, Charles, died 
in infancy; the fifth in the family was Sarah, who 
died in 1891, the wife of J. H. Woodford, of Salem 
Township. Special interest attaches to the fourth 
child, Elizabeth Dole, vyho is the wife of Mr. W. 
E. Kinsey, now living in Arizona. W. E. Kinsey 
was a son of Dr. Joseph E. Kinsey, and together 
they were merchants at Salem Center for a number 



of years. William E. Kinsey and Elizabeth Dole 
were married in 187J and tlieir daughter, Lois I., 
was married in 1895 to Thomas K. Marshall, then 
a rising young Indiana lawyer, later governor of 
the state, and now vice president of the United 
States. 

Frank T. Dole received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Salem Township attended the Angola 
High School, and at the age of sixteen was working 
as a carpenter. He followed that mechanical trade 
until 1891. After that for a few years he was a 
merchant at Salem Center, and on moving to Angola 
entered the employ of Mr. L. C. Steifel, with whom 
he remained seventeen years. He then resumed the 
role of an independent merchant and in 1912 was 
called to the duties of county treasurer, an office 
he filled with signal usefulness and efficiency for 
four years. Since retiring from office he has been 
connected with several business enterprises and is 
now engaged in the canning business. He owns a 
beautiful home on North Wayne Street in Angola. 

A republican in politics, he served six years in 
the City Council of Angola. He is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Rebekahs, and he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1878 Mr. Dole married Miss N. Ellen Kinsey. 
She was born in Salem Township November 6, 
1857, is a sister of William E. Kinsey, above noted, 
and a daughter of Dr. Joseph and Mary (Dill) 
Kinsey. Doctor Kinsey was an early settler in 
Allen County, Indiana, moved from there to De- 
Kalb County and in 1855 to Salem Center, where 
he established a large practice as a physician and 
was also associated with his son in the general mer- 
cantile business. He and his wife spent their last 
years in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dole, where 
Doctor Kinsey died in 1910, at the age of ninety-two, 
and his wife in 1905, aged seventy-eight. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dole have four children. William 
Earl, born in 1883, has for a number of years been 
clerk in the Angola postoffice. He married Edna 
Cowen, a daughter of Elmer Cowen, and has a 
son, William Earl, Jr. Floyd J. Dole, born in 1886, 
is manager of the express office at Continental, 
Ohio. He spent about eighteen months in the army, 
being head cook for the One Hundred and Thirty- 
Seventh Field Artillery, and going overseas to 
France in December, 1918, returning to this country 
in February, 1919. The third child, Cora Mildred, 
was born in 1890, and is the wife of Wayne Mc- 
Killen, and has a son, James Franklin. Lewis Pyrl 
Dole, born in 1894, spent three and a half months 
in training at Camp Grant toward the close of the 
war. 

John Moughler is a well known DeKalb County 
resident, his home being in the southwest corner 
of Troy Township. He is one of a rather numerous 
group of farmers who earned their prosper|tfy 
largely as renters. He farmed rented land for 
thirty years or more and in that time reared and 
provided for his family, and his later years are now 
being spent quietly, prosperously and busily on a 
farm of his own. 

Mr. Moughler was born in Wayne County, Ohio, 
February 9, 1850, a son of Jacob and Hannah 
(Bordner) Moughler, the former a native of Lucas 
County, Ohio, and the latter of Westmoreland 
County, Pennsylvania. They grew up in Wayne 
County, Ohio, were married there and in the fall 
of 1852 came to DeKalb County, settling a mile and 
a half south of Butler in Wilmington Township. 
They spent the rest of their lives on that farm 
and the father cleared up and put in cultivation most 
of the land. The mother was a member of the 



70 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Christian Church. Jacob Moughler was affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Butler and was a democrat in politics. In the fam- 
ily were seven children : Amanda, deceased ; John ; 
Mary, who became the wife of Orlando Bratton; 
Emma, deceased; Daniel, of Butler; Amos, de- 
ceased, and Charles, who died when two years old. 

John Moughler grew up on the homestead south 
of Butler and attended the common schools. One 
of the schools he attended was kept in a log house. 
He played an industrious part helping his father 
clear and cultivate the farm, and lived at home to 
the age of thirty-one. 

September 23, 1880, he married Alice Hendershot. 
She was born March 6, 1857, a daughter of B. F. 
and Susanna (Miller) Hendershot, the former a 
native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ashland 
County, Ohio. The parents were married in Will- 
iams County, Ohio, and began housekeeping in De- 
fiance County, and spent the rest of their lives 
there. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Moughler 
rented the old Yoey Farm not far from his father's 
home. Two years later they moved to another 
farm in Wilmington Township and from there came 
to Troy Township. A distinctive feature of Mr. 
Moughler's career as a farmer is that for twenty- 
two years he lived on and rented one farm. This 
farm during this time had three different owners. 
He reared his family there and eventually put away 
enough to enable him to buy his present place of 
forty acres in the southwest corner of Troy Town- 
ship. He keeps good grades of livestock, and is 
still busy with farming. Mr. Moughler is a demo- 
crat in politics. 

He and his wife have two sons. Burl and Glenn. 
Burl is one of the leading young farmers of Troy 
Township, while Glenn has an eighty-acre farm six 
miles east of Auburn. 

L. A. KiNTNER is one of the most progressive of 
the modern farmers of Steuben County. He has 
worked hard, has made several changes, each one 
for the better, has" adapted himself and his methods 
to changing conditions, and his place in Richland 
Township reflects well ordered prosperity at every 

He has lived most of his life in this county, but 
was born at Edon in Williams County, Ohio, Febru- 
ary 10, 1868. His father was George Kintner, who 
was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, September 24, 
1830. When a young man he moved to Williams 
County and located in a rather wild and primitive 
district southwest of Edon, where he improved a 
tract of land bought direct from the Government. 
He had previously operated a sawmill at Edon. 
About 1872 he sold his Ohio property and came to 
Steuben County, buying ninety-three and a fraction 
acres in Richland Township. This is the land now 
owned and occupied by his son L. A., and it has been 
under cultivation by members of the Kintner fam- 
ily nearly fifty years. In 1880 George Kintner built 
the large brick house which is still in a good state 
of repair and furnished an excellent home for the 
son and family. George Kintner retired and rented 
his farm in 1890, and lived in Angola until his death 
in 1007. He married Almira Garwood, who was 
born in Williams County, Ohio, January 30, 1840. 
She died in 191^, the mother of three children, 
H. P., L. A. and E. M. Kintner. 

L. A. Kintner attended public school at Metz 
and took commercial courses in the Tri-State Nor- 
mal College at Angola. All the time he was also 
acquiring practical experience as a farmer. One 
winter term he was teacher of a district school, and 
for three years or so worked out at monthly wages. 



January 30, 1895, was an important date in his 
career, marking his marriage to Miss Permilie M. 
Bockey, daughter of Sylvester Bockey. The fol- 
lowing eight years he rented his father's farm. Mov- 
ing to Fremont, he became a partner in the Fre- 
mont Lumber & Coal Company, but in January, 
1906, left town to resume farming on the old Aleck 
McClue place south of Fremont, where he lived 
about a year and a half. In February, 1907, he made 
a formal purchase of the old Kintner homestead. 
His ownership has brought him prosperity and has 
resulted in many notable improvements, the building 
of good barns and other facilities, and everything 
is now well arranged and equipped for the general 
purpose farm. He feeds a number of stock every 
season. 

Mr. Kintner is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge 
and Chapter at Angola and with the Knights of 
Pythias. He and his wife have two children and 
one grandchild. Mildred A., the daughter, is the 
wife of Peter Dick, and their son is named Robert. 
The son is Maurice G. Kintner. 

Seth Dunham. If any man has a thorough and 
authoritative knowledge of changing conditions in 
Otsego Township from pioneer times to the present 
it is Seth Dunham, a farmer there for over sixty 
years, and a witness of passing events and circum- 
stances for fully three quarters of a century. 

Mr. Dunham, who is still living on his farm at 
the venerable age of eighty-seven, was born in the 
City of Buffalo, Erie County, New York, August 7, 
1832, a son of Samuel and Sophia (Wilber) Dun- 
ham. His mother was born in New York State 
and died there at the age of thirty-two. The father 
was born in Delaware County, New York. Samuel 
Dunham brought his children to Indiana in 1844, 
traveling overland with wagons and two yoke of oxen. 
After a journey of four weeks he reached Steuben 
County and settled in Otsego Township. He bought 
160 acres of land from his brother, Charles Dun- 
ham, a previous settler, and during the next ten 
years did a great deal to make his land productive 
and a part of the growing community of homes and 
farms. He died at Hamilton April 28, 1856, at the 
age of fifty-two. He was a whig in politics and he 
died about the time the republican party was or- 
ganized. He and his wife had eight children, Pan- 
ama, Seth, Mary, Oliver and Oliva, twins, Harriet, 
Sophia and Ella. 

Of this large family Seth Dunham is the only 
survivor. He was in his twelfth year when brought 
to Steuben County. Prior to that time he had at- 
tended public schools in New York State, and he 
also went to school some in the backwoods schools 
of Otsego Township. He adapted himself to the 
pioneer conditions, and became a good himter as 
well as a good farmer. As late as 1852 Mr. Dun- 
ham killed fifteen deer in Otsego Township besides 
a large number of wild turkeys. At the time of 
his marriage he bought eighty acres of land where 
he lives today, and his increasing resources enabled 
him to improve his possessions until today he owns 
280 acres. Along with good crops he has for many 
years handled livestock, not only raising cattle 
and hogs but buying and selling and feeding. Mr. 
Dunham has lived an interesting though not a 
conspicuous life, has done his duty quietly by his 
family and his neighbors, but has never sought the 
distinction of public office. He is a republican, 
having been identified with that party from the 
time of its organization, and his wife is a member 
of the Christian Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunham are one of the oldest 
married couples in Steuben County. The date of 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



71 



their marriage was November lo, 1859. Her maiden 
name was Mary Ann McEntarfer/ She was born 
in Stark County. Ohio, August 2, 1837, and was an 
infant when licr parents, Daniel and EHzabeth 
(Getel) McEntarfcr, accomplished a pioneer over- 
land journey with ox team and conveyance to In- 
diana in 183S. They settled in Franklin Township 
of DcKalb County, where her fatlier died in i860, 
at the age of sixty. Her mother spent her last 
days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dunham and 
passed away in 1872. Five children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunham. Caroline, the oldest, is 
the wife of Clark Tingler and had three children, 
Guy, Lloyd and ^label. Ellen is the wife of Free- 
man Cary, and her family consists of Irina, Seth 
and Irvin. The son Seth married Zelma Teegardin, 
daughter of Thomas Teegardin. Viola Dunham is 
the wife of Edward Hand, and has six children, 
named Dorris, Kenneth, Dunham, Artis, Theodore 
and Donald. 

Alexander Thompson came to Steuben County 
during the Civil war, enlisted shortly afterward in 
an Indiana regiment, and at the close of the war 
returned and resumed his civic status as a farmer. 
He gave nearly half a century to the management 
of his business affairs, and is now retired. 

Mr. Thompson, was born in Crawford County, 
Ohio, September 27, 1846, a son of William Cannon 
and Harriet (Ferguson) Thompson. William 
Cannon Thompson was born in Indiana County, 
Pennsylvania, April 2, 1807, a son of Hugh S. 
Thompson. He married April 16. 1844, Harriet Fer- 
guson, who was born in Richland County, near 
Mansfield, Ohio, April 10, 1819. After their mar- 
riage in Richland County they settled in Crawford 
County, and in 1864 moved to Steuben County, 
locating on the farm which their son Alexander 
now owns in Clear Lake Township. William C. 
Thompson died there May 31, 1890, and his widow 
at the home of her daughter Harriet in Hillsdale 
County, Michigan, in December, 1899. William C. 
Thompson was a republican, and he and his wife 
were United Presbyterians. Their children were : 
Hugh F., who was killed by a horse in Crawford 
Count}', Ohio, at the age of six years ; Alexander ; 
Mary Elizabeth ; Harriet F. ; John Franklin ; and 
Effie, who was killed by a horse in Steuben County 
at the age of eight years. 

Alexander Thompson lived in Crawford County 
until he was seventeen years of age, and acquired 
his education there. When he came to Steuben 
County in 1864 he rode horseback, and in the fol- 
lowing February he enlisted at Fremont in the One 
Hundred and Fifty-Second Indiana Infantry, in 
Company C. He was with that regiment in serv- 
ice until the close of hostilities. On returning to 
Steuben County he bought sixty acres in Clear Lake 
Towhship. He farmed for many years, owned con- 
siderable property in Ray, where he had his home 
for twenty years, and he also owns the old home- 
stead of eighty-five acres. Mr. Thompson is affil- 
iated with the Independent Order of Odd FelJows 
and the Grand Army of the Republic. For a tirne 
he lived in Branch Count.v, Michigan, and while 
there served as deputy sheriff of Branch County 
under William H. Herendeen. 

In 1875 Mr. Thompson married Alice Ellis, of 
Branch County, a daughter of Daniel Ellis, now 
deceased. Mrs. Thompson died in 1901. She was 
the mother of six children, and a number of grand- 
children now survive her. The oldest was Effie, 
who died when six years old. Madge is the wife 
of Dr. Lee H. Dugand, of Ludington. Michigan, 
and they have two children, named Muriel Margaret 
and George. Irene Thompson married C. S. 



Stephens, of Portland, Oregon, and has a son, Ken- 
neth. Ross A. is a railroad agent at Rose Lawn 
in Newton County, Indiana. He married Rose 
Swartzel. John Rollo Thompson is a well known 
citizen of Fremont and has a son, John R., Jr. 
The youngest of the family, Kenneth, died when 
six years old. 

Francis Leason. In the early days of DeKalb 
County a substantial English family was established 
in Troy Township by the name Leason. A number 
of its representatives are still found in that vicinity, 
one of them being Mr. Francis Leason, who still 
goes about his daily vocation as a farmer on the 
east half of the northwest quarter of section 8. 

He was born in Erie County, Ohio, February 2, 
1854, a son of Joseph and Mary (Sharp) Leason. 
His father was born in England December 2, 1810, 
a son of Francis Leason, while the mother was born 
March 2, 1819. in the same country. The father 
grew up in Derbyshire and the mother in Notting- 
ham, and they were married in June, 1848. The 
following week they set out for the United States 
and at once located in Erie County, Ohio. Joseph 
Leason rented a farm there a short time, then re- 
turned to England for two years, after which he 
again became an Erie County farmer and in 1856 
made his second return to England. In 1862 he 
was again in Erie County, Ohio, and continued 
farming there until 1867, when he removed to 
Indiana and bought sixty acres in section 8 of 
Troy Township. He lived there until his death in 
1879 his wife having passed away in 1872. He 
was one of the leading members of the United 
Brethren Church in the community. He never took 
out his papers to become an .'Kmerican citizen. 

Francis Leason was the only child of his parents 
and since he was thirteen years of age has lived in 
Troy Township. He acquired his education in the 
common schools and on December 5. 1879. married 
Mary E. Stearns. She was born "in Trov Town- 
ship July 20. i8S9. a daughter of John and Nancy 
(Ward) Stearns. Her father was born in Morrow 
County. Ohio. December 3. 1S29, and her mother 
April II. 1833. in Ashtabula County of the same 
state. They were married July 13. 1856, and Mrs. 
Leason is their only daughter. 

■ Mr. and Mrs. Leason have three children: John, 
Charles, born February 17. 18S3. married and living 
at Monroe. Michigan ; and Carrie, born February 
6. 1887. still at home with her parents. The latter 
are active members of the Zion United Brethren 
Church, and ^[r. Leason is a republican. He and 
his wife have six grandchildren. 

John Leason. son of Francis and Mary (Stearns) 
Leason. is a member of the third generation of this 
family and has a valuable farm in section 8 of 
Troy Township. He was bnrn May 6, 1881. on a 
farm adjoining his present home, and he grew up 
and received his education in that localitv. Tune 
8. T904, he married Mildred C. Hammond. She 
was born in Franklin Township of DeKalb County 
(Dctober 29, 188.,, a daughter of George and Caro- 
line Hammond. She was reared in her native 
township and received a common school education. 
Aiter their marriage John Leason and wife lived 
on the home farm for about five years and then 
came to their present place, where they have eighty 
acres devoted to general farming and stock raising. 
They are active members of the West Zion United 
Brethren Church, Mr. Leason being on the official 
boards and finance committee. He is a republican 
in politics. To their marriage have been born five 
children, Violet, Martin, Mildred and Dorothea and 
Doris, twins. 



72 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



WrLLiAM GoRsucH lias the reputation of being the 
wealthiest citizen of Sparta Township in Noble 
County. He is a very extensive land owner, and 
during his long life has used his industry and energy 
to such good advantage that accumulations have 
followed as a matter of course. An interesting fact 
and one that is significant is that he had only $30 
when he came to this county more than fifty-six 
years ago. 

He was born in Delaware County, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 25, 1842, son of Thomas and Anna (Crager) 
Gorsuch. His parents spent all their lives in Dela- 
ware County. Of their six children only three are 
now living: Noah and John E., of Licking County, 
Ohio, and William. 

William Gorsuch grew up in his native county and 
had little opportunity to attend school. He came to 
Noble County in 1863 to look after a tract of 240 
acres of land in Sparta Township. He has made that 
county his permanent home. April i, 1866, he mar- 
ried Mary E. Smith, She was born in Scotland 
County, Missouri, and came to Noble County with 
her parents during the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gorsuch had three children, and the two still living 
are Thomas A. and John P., both farmers in Sparta 
Township. Mrs. Gorsuch, who was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, died April 16, 1915. 

Mr._ Gorsuch at the present time owns 458 acres of 
land in Sparta Township, and for many' years has 
been a successful trader in land and other property. 
He has been a director in the Cromwell State Bank 
smce it was organized, also a stockholder in the 
Kimmell State Bank, and in politics is a democrat. 

George B. Maxton has lived in Steuben County 
since he was about four years old. He has led a 
quiet, unostentatious, but exceedingly busy and use- 
ful life, mainly on one farm in Otsego Township, 
and is raising crops today on the same land that 
his father cultivated half a century ago. 

Mr. Maxton was born in Richland County, Ohio, 
August 30, 1856, a son of John and Christina (Rals- 
ton) Maxton. His parents were both born in Penn- 
sylvania, his father October 22, 1822, and his mother 
December iq, 1826. His grandparents, John and 
Anna (Clark) Maxton, spent most of their lives in 
Green County, Ohio. They were the parents of ten 
children. All these children were living and at- 
tended the funeral of their father, and at that time 
their combined ages were 709 years. John and 
Christina Maxton brought their family to Otsego 
Township, April i, i860, and settled on a farm of 
141^ acres. John Maxton cleared much of this 
land, put up some good buildings, saw his efforts 
prosper, his children grow to useful manhood and 
womanhood, and in these peaceful surroundings he 
died January 2, iQoo, his wife passing away October 
20, 1902. He was a democrat in politics and in 
religious views adopted a liberal attitude. The 
children were: Mrs. Jane Burch ; Mrs. Lydia Gil- 
bert, deceased; Mrs. Martha Beebe; George B.; 
Mrs. Mary Tasker ; Joseph, who died in infancy; 
and Mrs. Anna Shefifler. 

George B. Maxton grew up on the home farm, 
acquired a common school education and as a boy 
assisted his father in clearing more land for fields 
and tending the fields already in cultivation. He 
has always lived on the same place and is now 
proprietor of a farm with splendid improvements 
and of great productiveness. Mr. Maxton is a 
democrat, is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias at Angola 
and is a member of the Hamilton Co-operative Ship- 
pers Association. 



In 18S0 he married Miss Cassie Tingler. She 
was born in Hancock County, Ohio, May 25, 1858, 
and was about four years old when her parents, 
Michael and Nellie (Opp) Tingler, came to Steuben 
County and settled in Otsego Township. Her par- 
ents lived here upwards of half a century. Her 
mother died in 1906 and her father in 1910. Mrs. 
Maxtori has one sister, Mrs. Phoebe Badger. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Maxton, Hugh 
and Nellie. Hugh, born May 16, 1881, was edu- 
cated in the common schools and in recent years 
has assumed many of the responsibilities of man- 
aging his father's farm. He married Miss Georgia 
Boyles, and their four children are Carroll, Denver, 
Lewis and Ruth. The daughter Nellie, who was 
born June 29, 1883, is the wife of Roy Orewiler, a 
son of Adam Orewiler, of Steuben County. Two 
sons comprise the family of Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Orewiler, named Russell and Keith. 



Adolph E. Lambright, member of an old family 
of LaGrange County, has in his own right and in 
his own career achieved a dignified success as a 
farmer and good citizen, and while he has never 
been in politics has exercised a good influence in 
the community where he lives. His farm is in 
Johnson Township, three and a half miles north 
and one half mile west of Wolcottville. 

He was born in Clear Spring Township of the 
same county January 2, 1866, son of Michael and 
Augusta (Snitzer) Lambright. His father was 
born in Germany March g, 1839, and came to the 
United States with his father in 1847, being one of 
eight children, all of whom grew up in Holmes 
County. Ohio. Holmes County was the birthplace 
of Augusta Snitzer, who was born October 18, 
1839. She and Michael Lambright were married 
in August, i860, and in 1865 brought their family 
to Indiana and settled in Clear Spring Township, 
two and a half miles southwest of LaGrange. In 
1871 be moved to Johnson Township and spent 
the rest of his active years as a farmer there, but 
late in life moved to Wolcottville and died there. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Church. Of their eight children six are still living; 
William J., of Wolcottville; Adolph E.; Ella, wife 
of William Rowe ; Miles, of Elkhart, Indiana; 
Carrie, wife of Frank Eddy; and Alvin E., of John- 
son Township. 

Adolph E. has spent all his life in LaGrange 
County. He supplemented the advantages of the 
common schools by work in the Normal School at 
LaGrange and for twelve years was a teacher, and 
his former pupils credit him with being one of 
the best teachers of Johnson Township. While 
teaching he also engaged in farming. In April, 
1898. after his marriage, he bought the farm where 
he now resides, consisting of 140 acres. Mr. Lam- 
bright is well known locally as a breeder of Duroc 
hogs. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Church, and in politics he is a democrat. 

Mj-. Lambright was married April 21, 1891, to 
Emma Shuman, and they have six children. Agnes 
is a graduate of the LaGrange High School and 
a graduate dietitian of the Battle Creek Sani- 
tarium and is now the wife of Edgar Vasser. 
Mildred is a graduate of high school, and had a 
two-year college course. Harold graduated from 
high school and is now a student of electrical en- 
gineering in Purdue University. Clyde finished 
his high school course and was also a student of 
the Fort Wayne Business College. Lois is now 
in the high school at Wolcottville, while Julia is 
in the grade school. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



73 



Roy a. Van Fossen, though identified with 
Steuben County only a few years, is a member of 
a family which has been related with the com- 
munities of Northeast Indiana and across the state 
line in Williams County, Ohio, since pioneer times. 
Mr. Van Fossen, whose farm is in Millgrove 
Township, was born in Williams County, Ohio, July 
12, 1874, a son of John W. and Eliza J. (Gillis) 
Van Fossen. His paternal grandparents were Wil- 
liam and Marj' (Sloss) Van Fossen. More than 
eighty years ago they removed from Ohio to Dear- 
bornville, Michigan, and in 1838 returned to Ohio 
and settled in Williams County. Williams County 
at that time was practically a wilderness. William 
Van Fossen took up Government land in Florence 
Township. He was identified with the clearing and 
improvement of that land the rest of his life. He 
and his wife had si.x children, named Elizabeth, 
Rachel, William, Margaret, Jane and Thomas. 

John W. Van Fossen, who was born at Newark, 
Ohio, February 11, 1834, grew up from the age 
of four years in Williams County, acquired his 
education in public schools, and after attending the 
Northeastern Indiana Institute at Orland went 
west to Iowa and was one of the early teachers in 
that state. Returning to Williams County about 
the beginning of the Civil war, he enlisted October 
31, 1862, in the Fifth Independent Company of Ohio 
Sharpshooters. After that until the close of hos- 
tilities he was "with the Army of the Cumberland 
and was never absent a single day from duty. He 
participated in many engagements and after the 
battle of Chickamauga he was detailed for duty for 
six weeks in gathering up and burying the dead. 
The war over he returned to Williams County, and 
on February 22, 1866, married Eliza Jane Gillis. 
Her parents were William and Jane (McLaren) 
Gillis, the latter a native of Ireland. Mary Sloss, 
noted above as the wife of William Van Fossen, 
was also born in Ireland. William Gillis and wife 
were early settlers in Morrow County, Ohio, and in 
1845 rnoved to Williams County, spending the rest 
of their days in Florence Township, where their in- 
dustry cleared up a homestead. 

After his marriage John W. Van Fossen bought 
a farm in Florence Township, then moved to an- 
other place in Northwest Township in the same 
county, and in 1891 came to Northeast Indiana, set- 
tling in LaGrange County, on the Dr. Thomas B. 
Sloss farm. He made his last move in 1900, when 
he came to Orland, where he died November 2, 
1912. His widow survived him until November 27, 
1918. The late Mr. Van Fossen was a republican 
and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and he and his wife were Presbyterians, though 
in LaGrange County they worshipped in the Con- 
gregational Church at Orland. He was at one time 
ruling elder of the West Eagle Creek Church in 
Williams County. Their children were seven in 
number: Arthur A., deceased; Harvey G. ; Floy; 
Roy A.; Dr. William S., of Columbus, Ohio; 
Jeanette ; and Ella. 

Roy A. Van Fossen attended the public schools of 
Northwest Township in Williams County until he 
was sixteen years of age, when he came with his 
parents to LaGrange County. He subsequently 
graduated from the Orland High School. Since 
leaving school the burden of his activities has been 
as an agriculturist. He bought a farm of eighty 
acres in Millgrove Township in 191 1, and for the 
past eight years has done much to give that place 
modern improvements, and he has it well stocked 
and equipped for general farming purposes. He 
has a number of pure bred Duroc Jersey hogs. Mr. 
Van Fossen is a republican and attends the Con- 
gregational Church. 



In 1900 he married Miss Alice Casebeer, of James- 
town Township, daughter of Samuel and Gelain 
(Lucas) Casebeer, of Millgrove Township. Two 
children were born to their marriage: Arline, born 
November 10, 1902, graduated with the class of 1919 
from the Orland High School. Wayne, born June 
7, 1906, was just enjoying the promise of youth and 
the prospects of manhood when he died July 2T, 
1918. 

William M. Digcins has lived all his productive 
years in Noble County, and his interests in farming 
and as a public spirited citizen of Wayne Township 
have made him well known and highly esteemed in 
that community. 

Mr. Diggins, whose fine farm is a mile and a half 
west of Kendallville, was born June 14, 1859, son 
of Artemus and Caroline (Ottman) Diggins, the 
former a native of New York State and the latter 
of Ohio. Artemus Diggins came to Indiana when 
a boy, his people locating four miles north of Ken- 
dallville. The Ottman family came to Indiana from 
Ohio, the parents of Caroline Ottman having been 
born in Germany. Artemus Diggins and wife were 
members of the Christian Church and in politics he 
was a republican. There were five children : Wil- 
liam M. ; Elmer E., a farmer on the old home- 
stead ; Carrie, unmarried, now living in Los Angeles 
and formerly a teacher; Lin ford W., a railway 
mail clerk on the New York Central Lines ; and 
George T^., a contractor at Kendallville. 

William M., Diggins has spent his entire life in 
Noble County, was educated in the district schools 
and lived at home until he reached his maturity. 
.\fter two years in North Dakota Territory he re- 
turned to Indiana and bought a farm. September 
29, 1886, he married Miss Tillie M. Pierce. She 
was born in Noble County February 10, 1862, 
daughter of E. Clark Pierce. Her father was born 
in New York State and her mother in Ohio, and 
both families were early settlers in Indiana. E. 
Clark Pierce was brought to this state when only 
a year old. 

After his marriage Mr. Diggins began house- 
keeping on the farm where he now resides, and he 
has made all the improvements. His place com- 
prises 196 acres, and is the home of good live stock 
and of thrifty enterprise in every direction. 

Mr. and Mrs. Diggins have two children and one 
grandchild. Frank C., born in July, 1887, married 
Inez C. Black and they live on the home farm. 
Harold H., born September 4, 1892, attended the 
Kendallville High School and spent two years in 
Purdue University. He married Ruth Needham. 
The family are members of the Christian Church. 
Mr. Diggins is affiliated with Kendallville Lodge 
No. 276, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
is a republican. 

Ray Clark is one of the progressive farmers of 
Scott Township in Steuben County, having a fine 
farm of 140 acres in that locality. 

He was born in Scott Township, June 22, 1876, 
a son of Arby and Louisa J. (Dygert) Clark. His 
mother was born in York Township, September 2, 
1850, a daughter of Benjamin and Phoebe Anne 
(Carpenter) Dygert, one of the old and very prom- 
inent families in Steuben County. Arby Clark was 
born near Jamestown, New York, October 29, 1843, 
and was not yet eighteen years old when the Civil 
war broke out. He went all through that struggle as 
a member of Company A of the Forty-Ninth New 
York Infantry. After many battles he was cap- 
tured and was a prisoner of war for three months 
in Libby prison, was then transferred to Bell Isle, 
and two weeks later made his escape and swam 



74 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



down the James River all night and after many 
perils and adventures reached safety within the 
Union lines. Soon after the war he came back and 
settled in York Township of Steuben County and 
in 1877 took his family to Arkansas, where he lived 
five years. On returning to Steuben County he set- 
tled on forty acres in Scott Township, a tract of 
land that is now included in the farm of his son 
Ray. He continued farming there the rest of his 
life and died in December, 1915. His wife passed 
away June 30, 1915. They were the parents of six 
children : Clara, who was born in York Township 
in 1873 ; Ray ; Nina, who was born January 6, 
1879, in Arkansas and died at the age of eighteen 
years, three months and eight days ; Ina May, born 
October 12, 1881, in Arkansas; Leah, born in Scott 
Township of Steuben County, June 20, 1883; and 
Aria, born in Scott Township, March 14, 1888. 

Ray Clark had his first recollections of his parents' 
home in Arkansas and was about six years old when 
the family returned to Steuben County. He ac- 
quired his education in the local schools, and even- 
tually acquired the homestead of his father and has 
added to its area 100 acres, giving him the 140 acres 
as above noted. He has made good improvements, 
has tiled much of the land, and devotes his enter- 
prise to general crops and livestock. He feeds hogs, 
cattle and sheep every year. He is a republican 
voter, is affiliated with North East Lodge of the 
Masonic Order and Steuben Lodge No. 231 of the 
Odd Fellows at Fremont. 

April 4, 1914, Mr. Clark married Miss Luella Mc- 
Clue. She was a daughter of Thomas and Helen 
(Farnham) McClue and granddaughter of Erastus 
Farnham, one of the very early settlers of Steuben 
County. 

Wesley Weaver, whose affairs as a farmer of 
Noble County have long prospered, is a member 
of one of the old families of that section of North- 
east Indiana, and his people have always done more 
than merely make a living, and have upheld all 
those moral forces which give character to a com- 
munity. 

Mr. Weaver was born on the farm where he 
now lives in section 30 of Orange Township July 8, 
1861. His parents were Christian and Susanna 
(Towns) Weaver. Christian Weaver was born 
in Columbiana County, Ohio, January i, 1826. In 
1849, when twenty-three years of age, he journeyed 
overland to Northeastern Indiana and bought 180 
acres in Noble County, now the home farm of 
Wesley Weaver. After making the purchase he 
returned on foot to Ohio, and the following year 
came to Indiana with the Towns family. He went 
to work in the woods, cleared away a spot and 
built a log house, and on September 20, 1851. mar- 
ried Susanna Towns. She was born in Stark 
County, OhiOj February 11, 1824. The Towns 
family settled in Steuben County in 1850. Chris- 
tian Weaver, though starting life with limited 
means, has prospered far above the ordinary, and 
at the same time was extremely liberal of time and 
means in behalf of church and other worthy causes. 
His prosperity was represented by the ownership 
of about 300 acres of land. Soon after coming to 
this county he and his family joined the Spring- 
field Church of the Brethren, and in 1855 he was 
elected an elder in this church. He was a deep 
student of the Bible, and as a preacher was un- 
remitting in his devotions and work. During his 
life he officiated at many marriages and preached 
many funerals. He was a stanch democrat but 
never held any office. Christian Weaver died March 
16, 1907. His good wife, who .was the soul of 



generosity, died January 10, 1897. Six children were 
born to them, and two are still living, Sylvanus, 
of Orange Township, and Wesley. 

Wesley Weaver grew up on the old farm and 
was well educated in the district schools. He lived 
at home until his marriage. 

Mr. Weaver married Miss Barbara Frick. She 
was born in Elkhart Township of Noble County 
and was educated in the local schools. Since their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Weaver have occupied the 
old Weaver homestead, containing 108 acres, and 
he also has 180 acres in Elkhart Township. He 
followed general farming and has good grades of 
livestock of all kinds. Mr. Weaver is also a 
stockholder in the Kendallville Motor Truck Com- 
pany. He is a democrat, keeps well informed on 
all current affairs, and with his family is active in 
the Church of the Brethren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Weaver have three children : Grover 
is a graduate of the common schools and married 
Mary Pickett; Olive is the wife of Lee Franks; 
and Wilber married Mary Chapman. 

R.\LPH A. Morse, a prominent young farmer of 
Steuben County, is the active manager of the Morse 
farm in Jamestown Township, where his father lived 
for many years. The family came to Steuben County 
over sixty-five years ago, and the name has always 
been associated with industry and. sound citizen- 
ship. 

Mr. Morse was born in Jackson Township Sep- 
tember IS, 1883, a son of Orrin L. and Alice (Cor- 
bett) Morse, and a grandson of John Morse, who 
came in 1852 to Steuben County, first settling in 
Pleasant and later in Jackson Township, where he 
died. The children of John were George, Sanford, 
Francis, Hortense, Louisa, Jerome, Orrin and John. 

Orrin L. Morse was born in Michigan June 5, 
1847, and his wife was born the 25th of June of 
the same year. He grew up in Pleasant and Jackson 
townships, and after getting his education went west 
to Nebraska and homesteaded a quarter section. 
Later he returned to his home county and first had 
a farm of forty acres in Jackson Township. He 
sold that and in the spring of 1884 bought eighty 
acres in Jamestown Township, where his son Ralph 
now lives. He made many good improvements on 
this farm, building a substantial brick house in 
1892. He lived on the farm and was active in its 
work until 191 1, when he moved to Hamilton. In 
later years he has made his home at Mason, Mich- 
igan. His wife died on the old farm May 3, 1907. 
Orrin Morse is a republican and a member of the 
Methodist Church. He and his wife had two daugh- 
ters and one son: Lillie, wife of C. W. Hertz, of 
Michigan ; Daisy, wife of Ira Bowerman, of Jack- 
son Township ; and Ralph A. 

Ralph A. Morse grew up on his father's farm 
and had a public school education, supplemented 
by courses in the Tri-State College at Angola. He 
has since been a farmer and now leases the home 
farm from his father. He handles good live stock. 
Mr. Morse is a republican and his wife is a Meth- 
odist. August 27, 1908, he married Miss Eva Tubbs, 
a native of Branch County, Michigan. 

John F. Cameron, M. D. A native of Steuben 
County, Doctor Cameron chose this county as the 
scene of his life work, and as a physician and sur- 
geon for thirty years he has gained real distinction 
in his profession and rendered a service that is 
appreciated. 

Doctor Cameron was born in Richland Township 
May 8, 1855, a son of John and Mary (Carlin) 
Cameron. His maternal grandfather, was Robert 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



75. 



Carlin. John Cameron was born in Scotland, son 
of George and Janet Cameron. George Cameron 
brought his family from Scotland in 1834, and after 
several years in Canada three of his children came to 
Indiana. John Cameron came to America six months 
previous to the family's immigration. He was 
nineteen years of age when he came to America, 
and on leaving Canada he went to the State of 
New York and took some sub-contracts for work 
on the Erie Canal. Later the same business brought 
him to Indiana as a contractor on the Wabash 
Canal. During a year and a half at that work he 
saved money sufficient to enable him to take up a 
homestead in Richland Township of Steuben 
County in 1841. He acquired 160 acres of timbered 
land, and lived there until his death in 1878. He 
was a man of prominence in that locality, serving 
twelve jears as a justice of the peace, and was in 
his second term as a county commissioner when he 
died. He was also trustee of Richland Township two 
terms, and was very active and made his experience 
as a contractor count for public benefit in laying 
out and surveying public roads. 

Doctor Cameron received his early education in 
the public schools of Richland Township, graduated 
from the academy at AngoFa, and spent one term 
in Hillsdale College of Michigan. He paid his way 
and earned the money for his medical course by 
teaching school. He began the study of medicine 
with his brother, Dr. J. G. Cameron, at Edon, Ohio, 
and then entered Rush Medical College at Chicago, 
where he graduated in 1880. On December 12, 1880, 
he married Elnora Powers, daughter of Hon. Clark 
Powers. She died in 1886, and her only child, J. 
Clark, died in infancy. 

Doctor Cameron began practice at Hamilton on 
April 29, iSSo, and has practiced medicine steadily 
in Steuben County ever since with the exception of 
the time he has been in school during post-graduate 
work. He still enjoys a large professional business 
at Hamilton and the surrounding country. He took 
post-graduate courses in the Medical School of New 
York, and was in Columbia University Medical Col- 
lege during the winter of 1886-87. Doctor Cameron 
was one of the first directors after the organization 
of the First National Bank at Angola, and has 
been steadily on the board of that institution ever 
since. Since 1887 he has frequently attended annual 
clinics in Rush Medical College at Chicago, and is a 
member of the County, State and American ^Medical 
associations. He is a charter member of Hamilton 
Lodge Knights of Pythias, which was organized in 

37, Doctor Cameron married 
Don Franklin, the older son 



On November 6, i 
Mary Jane Haughey. 
of Doctor Cameron, is a graduate of the Hamilton 
High School, the Tri-State Normal College at An- 
gola, received his Bachelor of Arts degree from 
the Indiana State University at Bloornington, and 
took his Master's degree at Chicago University, and 
has a Fellowship in the University of Minnesota. 
His major studies were chemistry and physics. He 
finished his undergraduate medical course in Johns 
Hopkins University, where he graduated in 1913 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He had 
one year as interne in St. Luke's Hospital at Chi- 
cago. He then served as an interne in Johns Hop- 
kins University, and there took examination for a 
medical officer in the navy, receiving a reserve com- 
mission. For one year and a half he worked under 
the direction of Doctor Y'oung, an eminent urologist 
at Brady Institute. He also did three years of 
post-graduate work in the Minnesota State Univer- 
sity, but in the meantime, before receiving his degree, 
was called into the navy and at present is at the 



Kansas City Recruiting Station with the rank of 
first lieutenant. 

Angus Lavern, the second son, completed the 
high school work in Hamilton, attended the State 
Normal at Terre Haute two years, and is also a 
graduate of the Indiana State University, taking 
one year of his medical work there. He received the 
degree Bachelor of Arts frotn Indiana University, 
and has his Master's degree from the University 
of Chicago, where he did special work in pathology 
and bacteriology. He graduated in med'cme from 
Rush Medical College in 1916. For one year he 
was connected with the staff of the Children's 
Memorial Hospital, and the second year was con- 
nected with the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago 
in the capacity of assistant house surgeon. He went 
to France as a first lieutenant with Base Hospital 
No. 13, one of the first units of the American 
forces to go overseas. At present he is serving a 
three-year surgical fellowship at the University of 
Minnesota. 

Mrs. Cameron's father was Timothy Haughey, 
who was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, November 
5, 1824, and died June 28, 1914. Her mother was 
Mary Catherine Gerst, who was born November 
29, 1823, in North Bavaria, Germany. Timothy 
Haughey was a pioneer of Steuben County, locat- 
ing in Otsego Township in 1843. He spent prac- 
tically all the rest of his life there as a farmer. 
During his first years in the county he also taught 
school during the winter terms. He and his wife 
had the following children: Christiana, Hannah 
Louise, William D., Phoebe Eliza, Mary Jane, 
Emily, Laura Rumina and Frances G. Mrs. Cam- 
eron is a graduate of Valparaiso University, and for 
eight years before her marriage taught school in 
Steuben County. She is a granddaughter of Robert 
and Hannah (Wyckoff) Haughev, both natives of 
eastern states. They settled in DeKalb County in 
1846. 

Sherman O. Cole. The ability with which he 
has directed his private affairs as a farmer and all 
around good citizen has commended him so strong- 
ly to the confidence and good will of his fellow 
citizens in Scott Township that Mr. Cole is by 
choice of the people serving as township trustee. 
He is a native of his present township and repre- 
sents one of the old and prominent families of 
Steuben Township. Other references to the Cole 
family are found on other pages of this publication. 

Mr. Cole was born in Scott Township, September 
24, 1867, a son of Nelson and Eliza f Phenacie) Cole. 
He grew up on his father's farm, and the advantages 
of the public schools were supplemented by courses 
in the Tri-State College. From college he returned 
home and began farming, and his independent career 
was started with a small place of thirty acres. After 
keeping that for several years he sold it and bought 
a larger place of eighty acres situated just east 
of the farm of his brother, Frank Cole. He sold 
that in 1904 and then bought the l6o-acre Kinney 
farm. Mr. Cole is in every way progressive and has 
given his farm some high class modern improve- 
ments. In T916 he built a large barn 40x100 feet 
and also a hay and straw barn 40x60 feet. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising, and 
he owns two other farms in Scott Township, eighty 
acres in each and both improved with good build- 
ings. 

Mr. Cole has interested himself in local affairs 
and was elected township Trustee in roi8 for a 
term of four years. He is a republican, is affiliated 
with the Lodge of Odd Fellows at Metz and the ' 
Knights of Pj'thias at Fremont. He attends the 
Christian Church. 



76 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



November zj, 1890, he married Mary Dotts, who 
was born in Scott Township, March 7, 1870, a 
daughter of John and Louisa (Sage) Dotts. Her 
father was born in Hancock County, Ohio, March 
28, 1835, and her mother in Lorain County of the 
same state July 12, 1842. John Dotts was brought 
to Steuben County in 1847 by his father and step- 
mother, and he grew up here and was long well 
known in the citizenship of northeast Indiana. He 
died August 30, 1915, and his wife April 21, IQ15. 
Mrs. Cole is one of four living children, the others 
being Elmer, Lena and Carl. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cole also have four children. Wavel, 
born July 29, 1891, died February 13, 1900. Ora 
Nelson, born February 13, 1897, went to the com- 
mon schools through the eighth grade, attended the 
Angola High School two years, and is now at home. 
Wilma, born April 20, 1901, graduated from the 
Tri-State College. Joyce, born March 15, 1908, is 
now in the grammar school. 

Reuben B. Walb. One of the hard working 
farmers and respected citizens of LaGrange County 
is Reuben B. Walb, who has spent nearly fifty 
years in cultivating crops and raising livestock, and 
now has a tine farm and country home in Johnson 
Township, in section 17. 

He was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, 
November 21, 1850, a son of Reuben and Eliza 
(Beaver) Walb. ' The Walb family originated in 
Switzerland. On coming to America they settled 
in Pennsylvania. Reuben Walb after his marriage 
to Eliza Beaver moved to Huntingdon County, 
Pennsylvania. Reuben B. Walb grew up there and 
became acquainted with Susanna Norris. They 
were married July 22, 1875, and continued to live 
in Pennsylvania several years. 

April 5, 1878, Mr. Walb came to LaGrange 
County, Indiana, and settled in Clay Township. 
He owns forty acres of land there and worked it 
at the same time he followed his trade as a car- 
penter. In 1898 he moved his family to Johnson 
Township, where he has lived now for over twenty 
years. Mr. Walb is a republican, and is a trustee 
of the Valentine Methodist Church, where all his 
family attend worship. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walb have five children: Ira B., 
who was born in Pennsylvania and is now livmg 
at LaGrange, Indiana; Clyde A., who was born m 
Clay Township, is a former county surveyor and a 
banker and contractor; Bertha P., born July 16, 
1880, is a deaconess in the Methodist Church in 
Chicago; Vera, born in April, 1882, is the wife of 
Irvin Cook, of Johnson Township; and Ray, born 
June 8, i88s. is helping his father farm. Mr. and 
Mrs. Walb also have nine grandchildren. 

Zeotus p. Keeslar, whose home is in Millgrove 
Township, is a member of the rather numerous 
and specially prominent and influential Keeslar fam- 
ily, whose name is identified with the early settle- 
ment and affairs not only of Steuben County but 
of Branch County, Michigan. 

Mr. Keeslar was born where Dan Pocock now 
lives in Millgrove Township, April 29, 1855. His 
grandfather was Peter Keeslar. Some more extended 
reference to members of the family, including Peter, 
is made on other pages. The parents of Zeotus 
were Dr. George and Mary (Green) Keeslar.^ Mary 
Green was born in Seneca County, New York, a 
daughter of David and Maranda Green. David 
Green, who died in Coldwater, Michigan, was one 
of the eminent citizens of Branch County. His 
wife died at Orland, at the home of her son. Dr. 
George Keeslar. Dr. George Keeslar was born in 
New York in 1829 and was a small child when he 



went to Steuben County, Indiana, with his parents. 
He had a public school education, studied medi- 
cine with a physician at Orland, and in 1854 began 
a busy and successful practice at Auburn. His suc- 
cess and reputation as an able physician continued 
after he returned to Orland in 1869, and altogether 
he put in fifty busy and useful years in his pro- 
fession. He died in 1905, having retired from 
practice about a year previous. He was a repub- 
lican and a Knight Templar Mason. Doctor Kees- 
lar's wife died in 1898. Their children were Zaida, 
who died in 1918; Zeotus, and George C. 

Zeotus P. Keeslar attended school in Auburn, also 
the Orland Academy, and since early manhood his 
time and energies have been taken up with the prac- 
tice of agriculture. He owns a good farm of eighty- 
two acres in Millgrove Township, and has paid much 
attention to stockraising, particularly the breeding 
of draft horses. He is a republican in politics. 

March 10, 1885, Mr. Keeslar married Mary Alice 
Gamble, widow of Richard W. Gamble, and daugh- 
ter of Evan A. and Elizabeth E. (Philips) Rogers. 
The Rogers family came to Steuben County, and 
her parents both died there. Mr. and Mrs. Keeslar 
had one son, George Evan, born in 1888. He lived 
only eleven months. 

David A. Borntrager. It is by no means an in- 
dividual opinion but one based upon the consensus 
of a community that David A. Borntrager is an ex- 
ceptionally good farmer and an equally high class 
citizen. The offices of honor and trust he has filled 
in his township and county show that, while his farm 
is a model in arrangement and business like effi- 
ciency. This farm where he lives in Newbury Town- 
ship was the scene of his birth December 30, 1864. 
He is a son of Amos and Lydia (Miller) Born- 
trager. The Borntragers are an old and numerous 
family in Northeast Indiana and several of the 
branches have been described in this publication. 
Amos Borntrager was born in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania, November 20, 1826. 

David A. Borntrager attended public school in 
Newbury Township and when a young man rented 
his father's farm for three years and then bought 
the old home place. All his activities have been 
centered around the farm where he was born. He 
now owns 240 acres comprising the homestead and 
has acquired additional land until his total holdings 
aggregate 355 acres. On this land he has built a 
new modern home, has rebuilt the barn, and his 
buildings are very substantial and well arranged 
for all the demands made upon them. During the 
past twelve years Mr. Borntrager has been a breeder 
of pure bred Duroc Jersey hogs and Hereford 
cattle. His farm is known as the Sunny Ridge 
Stock Farm. 

In 1887 Mr. Borntrager married Mary Hostetler, 
a daughter of Jacob Hostetler. The children are 
four in number : Earley, a farmer in Newbury 
Township, married Delcie Mishler and has two 
daughters, Alice Hilda and Glenola Ruth; Flora 
Amcda, who is the wife of Neri Borntrager and has 
three children, named Ruby Minerva, Lorene Mar- 
jorie and Glenden Lamar; Amos Timothy, who has 
served with the American Expeditionary Forces in 
France and at present is engaged in reconstruction 
work, being still in service there ; and Fannie Anna. 
Mr. and Mrs. Borntrager also took into their home 
Lester Paul Hostetler when he was three years 
old, and he is still with the family, being fourteen 
vears of age. The son, Earley, was educated in 
the high school at Shipshewana, in the Goshen Nor- 
mal College and for five years was a teacher in 
Newbury Township. The son, Amos Timothy, 
likewise graduated from the Shipshewana High 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



77 



School and did normal work at Goshen, after which 
he taught for two years in his home township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Borntragcr are members of the 
Mennonite Church. Active in public affairs, he 
served twelve consecutive j-ears as a member of 
the Township Advisory Board and for four years 
was a member of the LaGrange County Council. 

Frank M. Tuttlr. The conditions surrounding 
the operation of land in the fertile regions embraced 
in northeastern Indiana are so satisfactory that 
many of the most representative citizens have prac- 
tically spent their lives here, being perfectly con- 
tent with the results accruing from their investments 
in land and time. One of these alert farmers is 
Frank M. Tuttle of Pleasant Lake, who owns and 
operates a fine farm of 120 acres one mile west of 
town. He was born near Pleasant Lake in Steuben 
Township October 31, 1857, a son of Lemon Tuttle, 
born in New York State in 1813. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Felora Gould, was born 
in New York State in 181 8, a daughter of Keah 
and Mehitable (Sturges) Gould. In 1838 Lemon 
Tuttle came to Indiana and in 1840 located in Steu- 
ben Township, Steuben County, where he lived 
until his death in June, 1881. His wife died De- 
cember 25th of the same year. Their children were 
as follows : Lorana, Emeret, Chester V., Frank, 
Alptha, Sylvester, Arad and Byron, the last three 
dying in infancy. ' 

Frank M. Tuttle attended the district schools of 
Steuben Township, and was then given the addi- 
tional advantage of two terms at Angola Academy. 
After attaining his majority he began farming on 
the old Tuttle homestead, where he remained until 
1902, leaving it in that year to go to Colorado. 
Since then he has made five trips to that state, 
crossing the Rocky Mountains ten times. With the 
exception of these trips Mr. Tuttle has spent his 
entire life in Steuben Township. In the spring of 
1919 he sold the Tuttle homestead and bought his 
present farm, one mile west of Pleasant Lake, 
which he is devoting to general farming. 

In 1882 Mr. Tuttle was married first to Dora 
Lower, a daughter of Jacob Lower, and they had 
three children, Clair V.. Carrol H., and Lower, the 
latter of whom died at the age of three months. 
Mrs. Tuttle died in 1901, and Mr. Tuttle was later 
married to Mildred Lemon, a daughter of Bert 
Lemon. Mr. Tuttle belongs to the Baptist Church 
of Pleasant Lake and gives it a generous support 
of time and money. He is prominent as a Mason 
and Knight of Pythias, taking a sincere interest in 
both fraternities. Since locating at Pleasant Lake 
he has become one of its representative citizens, 
and is ready to lend his influence to bring about 
any necessary improvements. An experienced 
farmer, he has known how to make his efforts yield 
him a good profit, and at the same time raise the 
standard for his neighborhood. 

Walter A. Ross has spent his life in Northeast 
Indiana and owns one of the many excellent farms 
found in this part of the state. While he never 
attended a scientific school of agriculture, Mr. Ross 
has made a thorough study of agricultural methods, 
illustrated in the splendid farm of which he is 
proprietor, known as Maple Shade Stock Farm, 
comprising 187 acres. This farm is two and a 
half miles west of Wolcottville on the county line, 
with thirty acres in Orange Township of Noble 
County. 

Mr. Ross was born in Noble County, near Brim- 
field, November 13, 1870, son of William and Mary 
(Bear) Ross. His father was born in Morrow 
County, Ohio, in 1833, while his mother was a na- 



tive of Pennsylvania. They were married in Mor- 
row County, then moved to Noble County, Indiana, 
and settled near Brimfield, and the father spent 
the rest of his life there as a farmer. The mother 
is still living on the old homestead. She is a mem- 
ber of the Mennonite Church and the father was 
a democrat. Of their si.x children three died young. 
Frank is a farmer in Orange Township, and Jennie 
is the wife of George Strater, of Wayne Township, 
Noble County. 

Walter A. Ross grew up on the old farm, at- 
tended country schools and the schools at Brim- 
field, and lived at home to the age of twenty-one. 
He worked out by the year and by hard work, 
thrifty saving and good management accumulated 
the capital which finally enabled him to purchase 
eighty acres of his present splendid farm, where 
he has lived since April, 1905. 

In 1892 Mr. Ross married Addie E. Dallas. She 
was born on the farm where she now lives, a 
daughter of James and Eliza E. (Young) Dallas. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross have five children, who are an 
honor to their parents. Cecil D., the oldest, grad- 
uated from high school, spent three years in the 
Indiana State University, and was a teacher in 
the high school in Iowa when he enlisted, in June, 
1917, in the Army Ambulance Service. He was 
assigned to duty with the French army and was 
overseas for sixteen months. He received his 
honorable discharge April 15, 1919- He saw real 
fighting, and was in the battle of Argonne, where 
the Americans gained the greatest triumph of the 
war, and in the Champagne offensive and defensive. 
Elmer, the second son, is a graduate of Purdue and 
has taken a mechanical engineering course in Pur- 
due University. The three youngest children are 
Robert, Margaret and Raymond, the two forrner 
in the grammar schools. Mr. Ross is affiliated with 
Ionic Lodge No. 380, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of which his sons Cecil and Elmer are also mem- 
bers. He is a past master of this lodge and is 
past worthy patron of the Eastern Star, of which 
his wife is a member. The Maple Shade Stock 
Farm has gained considerable local note for its 
spotted Poland China hogs. 

Frank F. Lewis is the fortunate owner of one 
of the well cultivated and valuable farms of Steuben 
County, land that has responded to his efforts as an 
agriculturist for a number of years. He was for- 
merly a traveling man, but in the environment of 
his farm has found that true contentment and pros- 
perity that is associated with the ownership of a 
portion of Indiana soil. 

He was born at Orland August 29, i8()9, and is 
a son of Hiram and Sallie Jeanette (Fuller) Lewis 
and grandson of Harvey and Elizabeth (Bassett) 
Lewis. His grandparents were early settlers in 
Salem Township of Steuben County, the land they 
owned and developed being now owned by the widow 
of their son, Dwight Lewis. Harvey Lewis returned 
to New York State for a time, but after 1855 lived 
in Steuben County until his death. He and his wife 
had the following children : Hiram M., Newel 
Pomeroy, Laura Ann, Frank B. and Dwight B. 

Hiram Lewis was born in Coventry County, New 
York, in 1834. He acquired his education in New 
York and also in the Northeastern Indiana Institute 
at Orland. He was a teacher in the early days at 
Orland. By trade he was a carpenter, and he con- 
structed the old boarding hall connected with the 
academy at Orland, and was a carpenter for the 
Kimball buildings on East Street, the two buildings 
now the hotel and bakery, and the homes of Hib- 
bard Roberts, Ziba Roberts and John Roberts. A 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



very busy man always, he lived a brief but simple 
life and "died in 1873, at the age of thirty-nine. He 
was a republican and his wife was a charter mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church at Orland. His 
wife was born in 1842 in Branch County, Michigan, 
in a log house along the banks of Gilead Lake. She 
survived her husband forty years, passing away in 
1913, at the age of seventy-one. He had two sons, 
Homer, who died at the age of six months, and 
Frank. 

Frank F. Lewis attended the public schools of 
Orland, graduated from the high school in 1887, and 
soon took up the business of traveling salesman. 
For fifteen years he sold buggies and did business 
in twenty-six states and in parts of Canada. In 191 1 
he returned to Steuben County and resumed farming 
and stock dealing. In 1904 he bought fifty acres, 
erected a good farm home in 1907, and also a barn, 
which was subsequently burned and replaced by a 
large and well appointed structure in 1915. Air. 
Lewis now owns 176 acres in Millgrove Township. 
He is a republican in politics and has been affiliated 
with the lodge of Odd Fellows at Orland for tlie 
past twenty-four years. 

November 27, 1890, he married Anna Carrie 
Twitchell. She was born in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County, September 22, 1869, a daughter 
of George and Laura (Scoville) Twitchell, and a 
granddaughter of Benjamin and Sabria (Rogers) 
Twitchell, the former born in 1805 and the latter in 
1804, a daughter of Jonathan Rogers. Benjamin 
Twitchell and wife came to Steuben County in 1836, 
being among the earliest pioneers. He was a brother 
of Jonas Twitchell, Sr., one of the very first set- 
tlers in the county. Benjamin Twitchell was a 
blacksmith in Orland and also bought forty acres 
of land in Millgrove Township and another farm of 
120 acres in Jackson Township, and died at Orland 
in 1868. He and his wife had the following chil- 
dren: Mary Jane, Henry, William, Homer, Betsy 
Ann, George Warren and Julia Viola. Betsy Ann 
Twitchell w^as the first white girl born in Steuben 
County. 

George Twitchell was born in Steuben County m 
1840, in Millgrove Township. His wife, Laura Sco- 
ville, was born in Richland Township in 1843. He 
was educated in the Northeast Indiana Institute at 
Orland, was a farmer and bought the old homestead 
of 120 acres in Millgrove Township. His wife died 
there in 1899, and he passed away in 191 1. He was 
a republican and a Mason, and his wife was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church at Orland. Mrs. 
Lewis was one of four children, named Clyde Sco- 
ville, Anna Carrie, Cora Bell and Bertha Laura. 

Mrs. Lewis graduated from the Orland High 
School, and she and her husband were the first 
graduates from that school to be married. For 
some 3'ears she was a teacher and she comes of a 
family of teachers, her brother and sisters having 
taught, as well as their mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis became the parents of five 
children. Anna Laura was born December 29, 
1891, graduated from the Orland High School in 
191 1, attended Hillsdale College in 1912-13 and is 
a milliner by profession, spending tw-o and a half 
years in her work at Bronson, Michigan. Marion 
was born in 1893, and died when six and a half 
years old. Ella Marie was born in December, 1896, 
and died ten weeks later, Hiram Twitchell, born 
January 22. 1898, is a graduate of the Orland High 
School, and lives at home with his father. Clyde 
Scoville was born January S, 1901, and has a fine 
record as an athlete in the Orland High School, 
having won prizes for running and being a good 
baseball player. 



John W. Long. One of the rural places that 
stands out conspicuous for its improvements, extent 
of acreage, and well ordered management in Noble 
County is the Ideal Farm in York Township. The 
farm proper comprises 400 acres, and its proprietor, 
John W. Long, also owns an additional 152 acres in 
another part of the township. His home is a mile 
west of Albion. 

That Mr. Long is a very successful farmer and 
business man needs no proof beyond what has al- 
ready been stated, but it is interesting to know that 
he has gained that prosperity practically through 
his own unaided efforts. He was born in Shelby 
County, Ohio, January 30, i860, son of John S. 
and Delila (Harvey) Long, his father a native of 
Pennsylvania and his mother of Maryland. They 
were married in Ohio and on December 23, 1863, 
located in Elkhart Township of Noble County. The 
father bought land there and spent the rest of his 
days in that community. The mother died at the 
home of her son John W. John S. Long had a farm 
of a 120 acres. He was a democrat in politics, and 
he and his wife were active members of the Chris- 
tian Church. In their family were fourteen children, 
divided equally between sons and daughters. The 
five still living are: Sarah, wife of Henry Conway; 
Permelia, widow of Daniel Whitmore ; John W. ; 
George, of Detroit, Michigan ; and Frank, of Gar- 
rett, Indiana. 

John W. Long grew up on the home farm in Noble 
County, acquired a district school education, an(} at 
tlie age of nineteen started out without a dollar and 
put in the next five years at hard work and monthly 
wages. In that time he had saved and accumulated a 
modest capital of $600. 

Thus fortified and with some degree of assurance 
for the future he married Catherine A. Stokes. Mrs. 
Long inherited forty acres, and they at once moved 
nn that land and began farming. With that excep- 
tion and with the money Mr. Long had saved before 
his marriage, all the subsequent prosperity has only 
been a just reward for their efforts and good judg- 
ment. Mr. Long has always been a stock raiser. He 
has also traded a number of farms and has made 
money in every such transaction. As a stockman he 
is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs 
and Percheron horses. Besides his farm he is vice 
president of the Albion Bank, is a stockholder in 
the Albion Roller Mills, and has a number of other 
interests that identify him prominently with his 
locality. On November 5, 1918, he was elected a 
member at large of the County Council. In politics 
Mr. Long is a republican. 

He and his wife have four children: Fred is a 
graduate of high school and is a farmer on his own 
account ; Orlando is also an independent farmer ; 
Reed has a farm at Albion ; and Ecil is still attend- 
ing school. 

James C. Wicoff, of Clear Lake Township, has 
spent his entire life in Steuben County as a pros- 
perous farmer, a member of one of the old families 
identified with Northeast Indiana and Northeastern 
Ohio. 

He was born in York Township September 4, 1871, 
a son of Peter Bruce and Jane (Hathaway) Wicoflf. 
Jane Hathaway was born at Bryan, Ohio, in 1840, 
a daughter of Richard and Lurinda (Bates) Hatha- 
way, both natives of Morrow County, Ohio. Richard 
Hathaway was born in 1813 and his wife in 1818. 
When their daughter Jane was a small child they 
moved to Williams County, Ohio, where Richard 
Hathaway died in 1885 and his wife in 1893. The 
Hathaway children were: Doctor Calvin; Jane; 




MR. AXD MRS. jollX W. I.oxc 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



79 



Doctor Albert, of Ohio; Sarah, wife of Burtoa 
Donovan, of Fremont, Indiana; Charles, who was 
a railroad engineer and was killed while building 
a road in New Mexico ; Horace, of Fremont, In- 
diana ; Caroline, deceased; and Judson, deceased. 

The grandfather of James C. Wicoif was John 
Wicoff, who married Margaret Castle. John Wicoff 
located in Williams County, Ohio, in 1844, and in 
1864 moved to Berrien, Michigan, where Margaret 
Wicoff died November 21, 1805, at the age of sixty. 
John Wicoff lived to advanced years and was long 
a resident of Steuben County. 

Peter Bruce Wicoff was born in Holmes County, 
Ohio, ilarch 12, 1837, went as a boy with his parents 
to Williams County and was married on June 2, 
1864. He and his wife at once removed to Berrien 
Springs, Michigan, and after one year returned to 
Williams County and settled in Northwest Town- 
ship. Four years later they moved to Missouri and 
then to Kansas. In 1874 they settled in Steuben 
County on a farm of seventy-five acres in York 
Township. They later resumed their residence in 
Kansas, where Peter B. Wicoff owned 160 acres 
of land. In 1880 they located permanently on a 
farm in York Township, where Peter Bruce Wicoff 
died in 1907. His widow is now living at Fremont 
with a daughter. Peter B. Wicoff was a republi- 
can, and he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He had a record as 
a Union soldier, having enlisted in 1861 in Com- 
pany H of the Third Ohio Cavalry. He was in 
service until the close of the war. The record of 
the children of Peter Bruce Wicoff and wife is as 
follows : Lurinda is the wife of William Hutchins, 
of Steuben County. Zoa E., a prominent educator, 
completed her work in the public schools of Williams 
County, also attended school in Jewel City, Kansas, 
the Angola High School, took the scientific course 
in the Tri-State College at Angola, and for a num- 
ber of years taught in the country school district of 
Steuben County, was in the grade schoo) at Crystal, 
Michigan, and for fourteen years has been con- 
nected with the schools at Fremont. She owns a fine 
home in that city. Her mother lives with her. 
Charles A, Wicoff is a farmer in York Township. 
He married Mary Reed, and they have seven chil- 
dren, named Helen, Harold J., Lucile, John, Milton, 
Arthur and Dale. The fourth of the family is 
Sarah Wicoff, who attended the State Normal 
School at Terre Haute, taught in Steuben County 
and at Angola for si.x years, and finally went to 
Battle Creek, Michigan, where she took the nurse's 
training course and for the past five years has 
been a trained nurse in the Battle Creek Sanitarium. 
John R. Wicoff after finishing his work in the 
Tri-State College taught three years and then took 
up railroading, and was killed in a railroad accident 
at Logansport in 1899. He married Sylvia Shertz. 
The si.xth of the family' is Harry J., unmarried and 
owner of a large ranch in Alberta, Canada. Archie 
B. died at the age of two years. 

James C. \\'icoff is the youngest of the family. 
He grew up on the home farm in York Township, 
attended the public schools, and for a number of 
years has devoted his best energies to farming. 
He bought a farm of seventy-five acres in York 
Township and recently sold that and on March i, 
1918. bought the Sam Bailey place of 100 acres 
in Clear Lake Township. This is one of the good 
farms, and under his management its resources 
are completely devoted to crops and livestock. 
Mr. Wicoff is a republican and attends the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

In 1908 he married Miss Vera Hall. She was 
born in Hillsdale County, Michigan, October 21, 



1876, a daughter of Thomas and Keziah (Weaver) 
Hall, formerly residents of York Township, Steu- 
ben County. Mr. and Mrs. Wicoff have one daugh- 
ter, Esther, born September 21, 1910. 

JoN.\THAN A. HoNTZ. The ownership of no 
acres of land in northeast Indiana constitutes a 
competence which would satisfy the man of ordinary 
ambition. In the case of Jonathan A. Hontz the 
ownership of that body of land in Washington 
Township of Noble County is the product of his 
own energies and labors carried on through a period 
of thirty years or more, since he left home to take 
up the battle of life on his own account. His farm 
is nine miles south of Cromwell. 

He was born in Sparta Township of the same 
county November 11, 1862, and has been a lifelong 
resident of Noble County. The parents, Jacob and 
Hannah (Hoak) Hontz, were both born in Ohio, 
his father in Stark County and his mother in Cham- 
paign County. Both families came to Noble County 
in early days, and Jacob and Hannah grew up and 
married here and then settled on a farm north of 
Cromwell, but in 1882 moved to the southeastern 
part of Washington Township, where they spent 
the rest of their lives. They were good Christian 
people, hard working and honest, and reared a fam- 
ily worthy of their names. The father was a demo- 
crat and quite active in the party. Of eleven 
children eight are still living: William, of North 
Webster, Indiana ; Jonathan ; Jennie, widow of 
Horace Scott; Daniel S., a dentist at North Web- 
ster; Harriet A., wife of Noah S. Stump; Lewis 
C, of Washingtoii township; Effie, wife of Norvel 
Metz; and Mabel, wife of Joseph Luckey. 

Jonathan Hontz attended the district school near 
his father's home, and after his education took his 
place in the fields, and lived on the home farm 
most of the time until he was twentv-cight years 
old. In September, iqoo, he married Pearl C. "fodd, 
who was born in Dallas County, Iowa, but came to 
Indiana before her marriage. Mr. and Rlrs. Hontz 
have seven children: Mary O., wife of Leroy 
•Ringenberg; Alildred M., who is a student in the 
high school at Etna, Indiana ; Ermel L., Sedrick D., 
Neva, Mabel L. and Thomas M. The family are 
members of the Baptist Church and Mr. Hontz is 
affiliated with Etna Lodge of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, he and his wife both being mem- 
bers of the Rebekah Lodge. In politics he is a 
democrat. 

William W. Hosllr. Good citizenship is not 
measured altogether by a man's success in his own 
business, but also by the interest he shows and the 
part he takes in the larger and broader affairs of 
tlie community in which he lives. While William 
W. Hosier is one of the most successful farmers 
of Orange Township, Noble County, his name is 
known and respected in that communitv fully as 
much for the valuable part he has taken at differ- 
ent times in the promotion of schools, good roads, 
and the raising of the standards of country life. 

Mr. Hosier is the proprietor of what is known 
as the Maple Hill Farm, comprising 210 acres, lo- 
cated two and a half miles east of Brimfield. He 
has lived in Noble County nearly all his life but 
was born in Morrow County, Ohio, April 22. 1846, 
a son of Samuel R. and Barbara (Kifer) Hosier. 
His parents were married in Ohio, and in 1850 
came to Noble County and located in Orange Towm- 
ship, where they were among the industrious and 
respected citizens the rest of their lives. The 
mother died in 1910, and the father, who was a re- 
publican, died in 1915. There were four children: 



80 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



J. H. Hosier, deceased; William W. ; Catherine 
M., wife of Thomas L. Imes ; and Ella B., wife 
of Admiran Imes. 

William W. Hosier was four >ears old when his 
parents came to Noble County. As a boy he at- 
tended the district schools, which were then far 
below the state of efficiency found in the country 
schools of this day and age. He also attended a 
commercial college in Chicago. For about a year 
he was employed as a clerk and bookkeeper at 
Brimfield, and then returned to the old farm. On 
December lo. 1874, Mr. Hosier married Mary E. 
Imes. She was born in Noble County in 1856, 
and died in 1916, at the age of si.xty years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hosier had only one daughter, Maude, 
who was a graduate of high school and spent three 
years in Oberlin College. She is now the wife 
of Edward H. Rhoades, of Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. 
Hosier was an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Brimfield. Mr. Hosier is a 
republican. One item of his public service which 
deserves especial record was his term as trustee 
of Orange Township. He was in that office four 
years, from 1884 to 1888. He was one of the 
original stockholders of the East Indiana Agricul- 
tural Fair Association when it was organized in 
1883, and for many years has been a director and 
is now its general superintendent. 

Stillman L. Collins is a grandson of the first 
permanent white settler in lamestown Township, 
and his individual record has been in keeping with 
that of the two preceding generations. Mr. Collins, 
formerly a merchant at Jamestown, is now looking 
after the old homestead place where he was born. 

Many of the interesting early chronicles of James- 
town Township might be described as the experi- 
ences of the Collins family. His grandfather, Bar- 
ton Collins, was, like many other early settlers of 
Steuben County, a Vermonter. He was born in 
Richland County, Vermont, February 23, 1794. His 
wife was born in Rhode Island January 2, 1797, and 
they were married in 1820. Barton Collins first 
came to the West in 1834, visiting LaPorte, Indiana. 
In the spring of 1835 he sold his property in the 
East, and with his wife and six daughters and three 
sons came west by wagon and team, shipping his 
goods by water to Detroit and not recovering them 
for a number of weeks. He traveled through South- 
ern Michigan to Coldwater and to Bronson, and then 
came south to the Vermont settlement at Orland. 
He was attracted to what is now Jamestown Town- 
ship, and on the third of July, 1836, entered land 
at the Fort Wayne land office. Some days later all 
the men from the Vermont settlement came and 
helped him put up the first log house in Jamestown 
Township. He and his family lived isolated from 
neighbors, and when their supply of provisions ran 
out they had nothing to subsist upon except pota- 
toes and salt. The nearest milling point was Burr 
Oak, Michigan, and Barton Collins before raising 
a crop of his own had to pay $2 a bushel for wheat 
and $1 a bushel for corn. Late in the fall of 1836 
he bought an ox team and went to Detroit to get 
his goods. Barton Collins was a hard worker, a 
man of fine influence in the community, but his life 
was spared only a few years after coming to Steuben 
County. He died in January, 1849. His widow 
survived him many years and was one of the best 
known of the early settlers. She died July 16, 1882, 
when past eighty-five years of age. She was the 
mother of eleven children, and undoubtedly derived 
a great deal of satisfaction from the worthy places 
her sons and daughters attained in life. 

The old homestead in Jamestown Township be- 
came the property of George W. Collins. He was 



born in Vermont in 1829 and was six years of age 
when his parents came to Steuben County. He at- 
tended some of the first log cabin schools, and for 
over half a century was identified with the social 
and business life of Jamestown Township. In 1856 
he married Avis Walter, whose parents, Seymour 
W. and .Orra (Coe) Walter, came from Vermont 
to Steuben County in 1846. George W. Collins died 
in 1912, and his wife in March, 1918. They were 
the parents of five children: Stillman L., Seymour 
B., Orra, Lydia (who became the wife of Fred 
Baker), and Bert L. 

Stillman L. Collins acquired his education in the 
district schools of Jamestown Township, also at- 
tended school at Orland and Angola and remained 
at home with his parents assisting in the work of 
the farm until he was twenty-six years old. For 
about twelve or fourteen years Mr. Collins con- 
ducted a general merchandise business at James- 
town. In 1914 he retired to the old home, where 
he owns 91^ acres and is giving his time to its 
management, and has it equipped with all the facili- 
ties for general farming and stockraising. 

September 15, 1880, Mr. Collins married Frances 
J. Wooster, a daughter of Dennis K. and Sarah 
jane (Hammond) Wooster. Her father was born 
in Onondaga County. New York, March 30, 1824, 
and her mother was born in England May i, 1828. 
Dennis K. Wooster moved to Branch County, Mich- 
igan, about 1869, and a year later settled in Mill- 
grove Township of Steuben County and spent his 
last years in Springfield Township of LaGrange 
County. He died in December, 1917. He and his 
wife had eight children: John, Frances J., Lyman 
H. (who died in childhood), Rupert L., Herbert 
and Helen, twins : Jennie E., and Dennis C. 

Mr. Collins is afliliated with Lodge No. 261 of the 
Knights of Pythias at Fremont, and Mrs. Collins 
is a member of the Pythian Sisters of the same 
place. To their marriage were born four children, 
and they also have four grandchildren. Lois M., 
the oldest of their children, was a successful teacher 
for about twelve years and is a graduate nurse from 
the Homeopathic Hospital at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
Mamie L. also taught school for about twelve years 
and is now a clerk in the War Department at Wash- 
ington. Una is the wife of Clyde Berry, and her 
three children are named Thelma, Elmore and Owen. 
Grover, the only son, married Elva Darr and has 
one child, Dale. 

George F. Ott is a well known farmer of Green 
Township, Noble County, lives on and has the active 
management of the Jesse Lock Farm, and is also an 
aggressive business man and especially active in 
the field of insurance. 

Mr. Ott was. born in Preble County, twelve miles 
north of Eaton, Ohio. June i, 1870, son of John A. 
and Susanna (Gangler) Ott, both of whom were 
born and reared in Preble County, Ohio. The 
grandfather, John Ott, though he spent most of 
his active life in Preble County, came to Noble 
County, Indiana, at an early day and invested heavily 
in the new lands of that district. Mrs. John A. 
Ott died in 1874 in Noble County and her husband 
afterward spent his last years in Noble County, 
Indiana. He was an active member of the Lutheran 
Church. John A. Ott by his first marriage had three 
children: Matilda, who died at the age of fourteen; 
George F. ; and Minnie, born December 29, 1873, 
is the wife of Carious Lock, of Ligonier, Indiana. 

George F. Ott was eight years old when brought 
to Noble County and received his education here in 
the public school. On December 13, 1890, he married 
Corilla Locke. Mrs. Ott was born on the farm 
where she now resides August 31, 1873, a daughter 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



81 



of Jesse A. and Sarah A. (Moore) Locke. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Ott lived in Preble 
County, Ohio, during 1894-95, a"d then returned 
to Green Township and have since had their home 
on the Locke farm. Mr. Ott in addition to farming 
is solicitor in Green Township for the Farmers 
Mutual Insurance Company. He is a democrat, is 
present township assessor, and is a member of the 
Christian Chapel. His sons W'illard and Carl are 
both active members of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ott had six children, five of whom 
are still living: Carl, who is now serving in the 
United States Navy; Willard, unmarried and liv- 
ing in Illinois; Lulu, wife of Alfred H. Rider, of 
Whitley County, Indiana ; Jessie and Harley, both 
at home. 

Orl.\ndo Fifer. The agricultural interests of 
Steuben County are many and varied, and the 
farmers of this and other counties in northeastern 
Indiana are justly numbered among the most repre- 
sentative citizens of the state. One of these de- 
serving of special mention is Orlando Fifer of 
Otsego Township, who was born in Pleasant Town- 
ship, this county, March 14, 1873, a son of Lewis 
Fifer and grandson of Adam Fifer. The birth of 
Adam Fifer occurred in Pennsylvania in 1817, and 
his wife, Elizabeth, was born in Germany February 
15, 1821. She was brought to the United States 
by her parents, who located in Ohio in i8j6. The 
marriage of Adam and Elizabeth Fifer occurred in 
Ohio, and on March 28, 1861, they came to Steuben 
County, Indiana, locating in Steuben Township, 
where he died November 2, 1883. He and his wife 
had the following children : Elizabeth, Lewis, 
Margaret, Lydia, Mary J., Justinna, William, Hattie, 
Addison, Loretta, Franklin and one who died in 
infancy. 

Lewis Fifer was born in Columbiana County, 
Ohio, October 13, 1842. On March 22, 1S65, he was 
married to Mrs. Martha (Harpman) George, and 
they had five children, as follows : Elva Jane, 
Margaret Leonora, John Adam, Orlando and Jessie 
A. Lewis Fifer became a landowner of Otsego 
Township when he bought 100 acres in section 18, 
in 1873. and on it he erected good buildings and 
made other substantial improvements. He and his 
wife were consistent members of the United Berth- 
ren Church, and active in its good work. His 
political views made him subscribe to the policies 
and support the candidates of the republican party. 
A man of the utmost probity, Lewis Fifer carried 
on all of his business operations with scrupulous 
uprightness, and was known far and wide as a man 
of his word. 

Orlando Fifer grew up on his father's farm, mak- 
ing himself useful from boyhood, and at the same 
time he attended the local schools. When, he 
attained to sufficient years he began farming for 
his father, and in March, 1904, he bought his father's 
farm and owns 100 acres of fertile land, on which 
are excellent buildings. Here he carries on general 
farming and stock raising, and is noted for the 
efficient manner in which he carries on his work. 

On March I, 1904. Mr. Fifer was married to 
Minnie Swift, born in Otsego Township, a daugh- 
ter of David and Anna (Strubble) Swift. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fifer have the following children : Lewis D., 
Grace A. and Leona L. Mr. Fifer belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, the order of Moose and the 
Gleaners. Always interested in public matters, he 
has rendered valuable aid in securing improvements 
in his township, and holds the confidence and 
esteem of his neighbors. 



Walter J. Needham is one of the older residents 
of Noble County, having come here when a boy, 
and is a prosperous farmer with a home on Maple 
Street, two miles east of the Sanitarium, in section 
II of Orange Township. 

Mr. Needham was born in Chicago, Illinois, No- 
vember 2, i86q, son of Walter and Martha (Clews) 
Needham. His parents were both born in Eng- 
land and were married there. After their mar- 
riage they emigrated to Australia and lived there 
several years, where the father followed his trade 
as a butcher. He then went back to England, and 
soon afterward sought a new home in Canada, 
going from there to Chicago, and not long after- 
ward coming to Noble County, Indiana. The fa- 
ther died in Noble County, and his widow is still 
living at Wolcottville. Of their thirteen children 
seven are still living: William B., who was born 
in .\ustralia and is now living in Kendallville ; 
Emma, wife of Carson Marker; Jennie, wife of 
Allen Hassinger; Anna, wife of George Holsinger; 
A. L. Needham; Walter J.; and Fannie, wife of 
Armel Gault. 

Walter J. Needham was brought to Noble County 
when a boy and grew up on a farm and attended 
district schools. He helped farm the home place, 
and afterward bought the 160 acres contained 
therein. 

November i, 1892, he married Miss Julia B. Dye. 
Mrs. Needham was born in Orange Township, a 
mile east of Brimfield, and is a graduate of the 
Rome City High School After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Needham lived for five years in 
Rome City, where he was a railroad man, being a 
brakeman'on the Lake Shore. He then moved to 
the farm where he now lives, and has his large 
place well cultivated, improved and managed as a 
valuable farm property. 

Mr. and Mrs. Needham have two sons. Basil E. 
is a graduate of the Rome City High School and 
married Inez Rimmel and lives near his father's 
home. Bruce B. was born August 15. 1909. The 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Rome City and Mr. Needham is a re- 
publican. Mrs. Needham is affiliated with the 
Eastern Star Chapter at Rome City. 

Charles S. Shutts, a former assessor and trus- 
tee of Jamestown Township, was born in that local- 
ity of Steuben County, and has been successfully 
identified with farming there for the past thirty 
years. 

Mr. Shutts was born in Jamestown Township 
August 24, 1866, a son of Herman C. and Mary 
(Collins) Shutts. His mother was born Novem- 
ber 28, 1844, a daughter of Samuel and Betsie 
(Bush) Collins. Herman C. Shutts was born in 
Sandusky County, Ohio, June 6, 1839. a son of 
Charles S. and Susanna (Richey) Shutts. Charles 
S. Shutts was born July 6, 1809, died November 30, 
1859, and was married January 19, 1832. Susanna 
Richey was born in 1808. They spent most of their 
lives in Sandusky County, Ohio, and their children 
were Mary Jane, Eliza, Herman C, .'Mmira and 
Lucy S. Herman C. Shutts, only son of his parents, 
moved from Sandusky County. Ohio, to Jamestown 
Township in i860, buying a farm in sections 19 and 
18. All the improvements on that land were put 
there by his hands or at his direction, and he made 
a good farm out of the 120 acres, and resided there 
until his death. His children were: Charles S. ; 
Lucy M., wife of Charles Turner; Jennie, wife of 
Horace Davis ; and Erva L., who was married to 
Frank Mallory. 



82 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Charles S. Shutts attended public school in James- 
town Township, and was a little past twenty-two 
years of age when on March 12, 1889, he married 
Libbie M. Rubley. She is a graduate of the Collins 
District School, also attended the Tri-State College 
at Angola, and afterward taught school. She is a 
daughter of John and Mary (Frick) Rubley, her 
father, born in Richland County, Ohio, September 
8, 1837. John Rubley came with his parents, J. J. 
and. Margaret Rubley, to Jamestown Township of 
Steuben County in 1848, and during his mature life 
was known as one of the prosperous farmers of this 
section. He died September 27, 191 1, at the age 
of seventy-four. John Rubley and wife had two 
children: John H. and Libbie M. 

Soon after his marriage Mr Shutts removed to 
his present farm in section 29 of Steuben Township. 
He owns 120 acres, devoted to general farming and 
stockraising, and has made most of the improve- 
ments which give the land value, including a set of 
substantial buildings. His public record includes his 
four-year term of service as assessor from 1900 to 
1904, while from 1904 to 1908 he was trustee of the 
township. Mr. and Mrs. Shutts have two children, 
Harry C. and Helen E. 

Benjamin Franklin Griffith, an honored 
veteran of the Civil war, was for upwards of half 
a century successfully engaged in farming in Otsego 
Township, Steuben County, and is now a retired resi- 
dent of Hamilton. 

He was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, May 
16, 1846, a son of John and Jemima (Gossage) 
Griffith. Further reference to his parents and their 
pioneer efforts at home-making in Northeast In- 
diana are made on other pages. The family came to 
Indiana in 1850, when Benjamin Franklin was four 
years old. He lived in their pioneer home in De- 
Kalb County until 1857, when his parents moved 
to Otsego Township in Steuben County. In these 
localities he acquired his education in the common 
schools, and in February, 1864, at the age of eighteen, 
enlisted in Company K of the One Hundred and 
Fifty-Second Indiana Infantry. He saw some hard 
service during the last year of the war, most of the 
time in the Shenandoah Valley. He returned from 
the army to take charge of the homestead and cared 
for his widowed mother until her death in 1884. He 
bought a part of the old farm, 128 acres, and had 
a busy life as an agriculturist until 191 1, when he 
moved to Hamilton, where he owns a comfortable 
home. Mr. Griffith is a republican, has been stanch 
in his party affiliations for over half a century, and 
at one time was trustee of Otsego Township. For 
a number of years he was affiliated with the Odd 
Fellows Lodge at Angola and is a member of the 
Grand Army Post. 

December 25, 1868, he married Miss Julia Car- 
penter. She was born in Huron County, Ohio, 
April 28, 1850, and was a small child when her 
parents, Harlow J. and Fanny (Merry) Carpenter, 
moved to Indiana in the fall of 1851 and settled in 
the woods of Otsego Township, just across from the 
old Seth Dunham place. Her father did much to 
improve his land there and died in 1883, at the 
age of sixty-eight. Her mother passed away in 
1893, at the age of seventy-six. Mr. Carpenter was 
a republican, though in early life he had voted as 
a democrat. In the Carpenter family were six 
children: Jesse, former auditor of Steuben County; 
Sarah, wife of Robert Humphreys; George; Betsey, 
widow of Lewis Griffith, of Hamilton; Julia A.; 
and Caroline, wife of Levi Brown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griffith have had the following 
children: Eugene, died in 1894. Harlow, a resident 



of Hamilton, married Samantha McClish, and they 
have four children, named Walter, Eugene, Isabel 
and Don. Walter was a soldier in the World war, 
spending most of his time at Fort Bliss, Texas, and 
Fort Jackson in North Carolina. He was in the 
service from May, 1918, until February, 1919. Maud 
the third child of Mr. and Mrs. Griffith, is the wife 
of Owen Garver, of Montana, and has two children, 
Valti and Fred. Lee is a resident of Tipton, In- 
diana. He married Nellie Knouse and has one 
son, Frank. 

Ferdinand Knappe. who has passed the age of 
fourscore and has been a resident of Noble County 
for over sixty years, has been one of the most 
active as well as one of the most useful citizens of 
his community. He has built a solid structure of 
community esteem by his work and influence, and 
no one has more sturdily upheld the elements of 
Christianity, education and morality than this octo- 
genarian citizen. 

Mr. Knappe, who is still living on his farm in 
Washington Township, six miles south of Kimmell, 
was born in Pike County, Pennsylvania, March 9, 
1838, a son of August and Anna M. (Wetzel) 
Knappe. His father was born in Prussian Poland 
and his mother in Baden, Germany. Both came by 
diverse^ routes to America about 1830, landed in 
New York City, and there became acquainted and 
married. They remained there about seven years, 
where August followed his trade as a cabinet maker. 
Later he followed the same occupation in Pennsyl- 
vania, then moved to New Jersey and lived in 
Sussex County until 1850. when he pioneered into 
the western country and located in Washington 
Township of Noble County, Indiana. Here he 
acquired eighty acres, and his first home was a 
cabin in the midst of the woods. He spent the rest 
of his life as a practical farmer, and acquired con- 
siderable land in that section. He was a man of 
distinctive leadership in his community. Both he 
and his wife for many years were active members 
of the Christian Church, though August was reared 
a Lutheran and his wife a Catholic. He was also 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and began voting as an American citizen with 
the whig party, later becoming a republican. In a 
family of nine children five are still living : Ferdi- 
nand ; Joseph E., of Washington Township ; Amelia, 
wife of Aaron King; Cecelia, twin sister of Amelia, 
wife of Jasper Gerken ; and William, a farmer on 
the old homestead. 

Ferdinand Knappe was about twelve years old 
when brought to Indiana. He grew up here, and 
since boj'hood has sustained a career of active use- 
fulness. In 1862 he married Eliza A. Long, and 
they had a long married companionship of more 
than fifty years, broken by the death of l\Irs. Knappe 
on July 7, 1918. To their marriage were born two 
children. Joseph A., the older, died at the age of 
six years. Sarah, the only surviving child, was 
born' October 25, 1864, and is the wife of George 
W. Stults. Mr.' and Mrs. Stults have five children, 
namely: Nellie M., wife of Lester Sechrist; Ernest 
R., who is the present assessor of Washington 
Township; Flosse, wife of James Sparrow; Nona, 
wife of Glen Bailey; and Florence, unmarried. 

Mr. Knappe has been a member of the Christian 
Broadway Church since 1863, as was also his wife, 
and he has been one of its most active leaders. 
He began teaching in the Sunday school when only 
fourteen years old. in 1852, and steadily served as 
teacher and superintendent and at one time was 
president of the Christian Sunday School Associa- 
tion of the Eel River Conference. Mr. Knappe 
owns a good farm of a hundred acres and still 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



83 



gives this his active superintendence. He is re- 
membered as one of the veteran scliool teachers 
of the pioneer days of Noble County. He began 
teaching in 1858, and did his last 'work in the 
schoolroom in 1880. At one time his wages were 
$16 a month, and he boarded around among the 
families of his pupils. His highest wages as a 
teacher was $30 a month. His terms of school 
were usually three or four months. He was elected 
and served as justice of the peace for a number 
of years and for two terms he was trustee of his 
township, from 1884 to 1888. Mr. Knappe is a 
republican in politics. 

OwEX L. Iddixcs is one of the prosperous and 
successful farmers of Orange Township, Noble 
County, and has one of the most interesting homes 
in that locality. His farm is on the Fort Wayne 
road, five miles northwest of Kendallville, and com- 
prises 100 acres. It is known as the Seldom Rest 
Farm. The farm has much local history connected 
with it. In the early days it was the haunt of a 
gang of counterfeiters and thieves, who made it 
their headquarters, from which they conducted 
raids upon the surrounding country, stealing horses 
and disposing of the spurious coin wliich they 
manufactured. All traces of these early uses have 
long since disappeared, and under ^Jr. Iddings' 
proprietorship it is a peaceful and productive land- 
scape, the farm being devoted to general crops and 
livestock. 

Mr. Iddings was born in Green Township of 
Noble County January 10, 1851, son of Jackson 
and Barbara (Dingman) Iddings. His people were 
pioneers and helped found the City of Kendall- 
ville and County of Noble. His father was born 
near Cleveland, Ohio, January 13, 1813. His mother 
was born near Dayton, Ohio, and was a member 
of the prominent Dingman-Forker family, who for 
a number of years has held family reunions and 
makes up one of the largest family relationships 
in this section of Indiana. The Dingman family 
came to Noble County in 1833, and bought eighty 
acres of land in section 33 of Wayne Township, 
now within the city limits of Kendallville. The 
first frame residence within the city limits was 
built by that family. Jackson Iddings arrived at 
Kendallville September 10, 1836, with his father, 
Henry Iddings. Henry Iddings entered a tract of 
land on which a part of Kendallville has since been 
built, and he developed it as a farm and lived there 
the rest of his life. All his children are now de- 
ceased. 

Jackson Iddings after his marriage bought eighty 
acres two miles south of Kendallville, and after 
living there two or three years and making a num- 
ber of improvements lost the land by reason of a 
defective title. He then removed to Green Town- 
ship, buying 160 acres near Green Center, and 
cleared up that land and made it his home until 
1853. He then moved a mile and a half northeast 
of Albion in Jefferson Township, where he ac- 
quired eighty acres, but after nine years sold that 
and bought a place two and a half miles west of 
Kendallville in Wayne Township. It was on that 
farm that Jackson Iddings spent his last days. 
He was a democrat and served as a justice of the 
peace in Green Township. His wife was a devout 
Baptist. In their family were thirteen children, 
six sons and seven daughters, and the four still 
living are : Asa, a farmer in Missouri ; Owen L. ; 
Ruth, wife of Willis Eckles ; and Ida, widow of 
Fred Strater. 

. Owen L. Iddings lived at home with his parents 
until he was about thirty-five years of age. He 



acquired a district school education and was well 
versed in farming before he made it his independ- 
ent vocation. 

December 30. 1886, he married Miss Ida Johnson. 
She was born in LaGrange County, Indiana, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1861, and was educated in the common 
schools of that county. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Iddings rented his father's farm and 
later bought it, and it has been under his proprietor- 
ship for the past eighteen years. Mrs. Iddings is 
an active member of the United Brethren Church. 

Four children were born to their marriage: Scott 
is manager for the Indiana Oil Company at Ken- 
dallville, and married Gladys Newman. Bessie is 
a graduate of the common schools and is the wife 
of Holly Leemaster, of Wayne Township. Nellie, 
the third child, died at the age of two years and 
twenty-one days. Russell is a graduate of the 
Rome City High School and is now handling most 
of the responsibilities of the home farm. Mr. Id- 
dings is a democrat in politics. 

George M. Rowley has figured not only as pro- 
prietor of one of the fine farms of Millgrove Town- 
ship in Steuben County, but also for his usefulness 
in public affairs. He has been township trustee and 
is present township assessor, and is proprietor of 
one of the finest farms around Lake Gage. 

Mr. Rowley was born in Oneida County, New 
York, November 15, 1850, but has spent most of his 
life in Steuben County. He is a son of Francis A. 
and Almira A. (Rockwell) Rowley, both natives of 
New York State, and a grandson of Abner Rowley, 
who in the early days entered a tract of land in 
Steuben County but never came here to make his 
permanent home. The land which he took up was 
a tract of timber around Lake Gage. Its develop- 
ment was left to his son, Francis .\. Rowley, who 
reached Millgrove Township in May, 1856. He 
rnade the first opening among the trees on the north 
side of Lake Gage, put up a frame house, gradually 
cleared land for cultivation, and he and his wife 
lived there the rest of their days. His first farm 
comprised ninety-six acres, and the property grew 
under his management until he owned an adjoining 
160 acres. Frances A. Rowley and wife had three 
children: Charles J., who married Alice Birce and 
has four children, named Frank B., James. Lee and 
Servetus. George M. is second in age. Cora B. is 
unmarried and lives at Los Angeles, California. 

George M. Rowley acquired his early education 
in the schools of Millgrove Township, where he 
has lived since he was six years old. He also at- 
tended the Orland Academy and for one term was 
a teacher. His youthful strength was given to farm- 
ing his father's place, and in 1872 he married Ella 
M. Hastings, a daughter of John and Lydia (Sher- 
wood) Hastings. 

After his marriage he bought a farm adjoining 
the old homestead near Lake Gage, and his land has 
been wonderfully improved under his ownership of 
forty-five years. Practically all the buildings have 
been put there by him. His original farm comprised 
sixty-nine acres. He inherited ninety-eight acres 
of the old homestead, and has the complete tract of 
165 acres devoted to general farming purposes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rowley have four children: Iva 
M. is the wife of Ralph Sperry, lives in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and has one daughter, Ruth : Matie 
IS unmarried and lives in Detroit ; Ned married Ella 
Haskms. and his family consists of Harold, Helen 
and James; Nellie is the wife of Frank Gav. of 
Angola. 

For twenty years or more Mr. Rowley has given 
part of his time to public affairs in public office. 
From 1895 to 1901 he was assessor of Millgrove 



84 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Township. From the duties of that office he gave 
his time to the trusteeship of Millgrove Township 
from igoi to 1905. In 1914 he was again honored 
with election as assessor, and was re-elected in 
1918. 

Benjamin Smith Grogg. The traveler through 
Richland Township whose attention is caught by 
the name "Progressive Farm" on substantial, well 
kept buildings, is not surprised to find in the owner 
of this property an unusually intelligent, well edu- 
cated, thoughtful man whose farming enterprises are 
successful and profitable. Benjamin Smith Grogg, 
owner and proprietor of Progressive Farm, was 
born November i, 1848, in Stark County, Ohio, and 
was brought to DeKalb County a babe in his 
mother's arms in 1849. His parents were Peter and 
Eliza (Smith) Grogg, whose other children were 
as follows : Amy Ann, who died in early woman- 
hood ; Lucinda, who is the wife of David Feagler ; 
Jacob W., who married Mary Fair; James H., who 
married Ida Showers ; Mary, who is the wife of 
J. A. Whittington ; Daniel S., who is deceased, 
married Elizabeth Imler ; Ellen, who is the wife 
of George Rakestrow ; and Elmer E., who is de- 
ceased, married Ida Smith. The family of the 
last named live where Peter Grogg located when 
he first came to Indiana. 

While there is a combination of French, Scotch, 
Irish and German blood in the Grogg ancestry, the 
history of the family in the United States centers 
in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. Peter Grogg, 
father of Benjamin S., was born March 2, 1821, in 
Stark County, Ohio, and was the seventh son born 
to Solomon and Mary (Snyder) Grogg, and his 
brothers were : John, Abraham, Solomon, George, 
Jacob and Daniel, and he had a sister, (Catherine. 
On September 2, 1846, he was married to Eliza 
Smith, who was the fifth in a family of nine chil- 
dren born to Benjamin and Rachel (Bender) Smith, 
whose other children were as follows; Aaron B., 
Lucinda, Harriet, Susan, Caroline, Ephraim, Hiram 
and Catherine. Two children were born to Peter 
and Eliza Grogg before they took up their residence 
in DeKalb County. When Mr. Grogg located on 
his first quarter section of land there were only 
two acres cleared, and it was through his industrial 
efforts that the wild land was changed into one of 
the most productive farms in this county. 

The parents of Benjamin S. Grogg belonged to the 
English Reformed Church at Tamarack, near their 
home, but they contributed to the building of 
churches at Waterloo and Fairfield Center, but 
later, under changed conditions, they united with 
the Lutheran, known to all as Si.xteen Church, in 
Richland Township, a present day old landmark of 
the county. The old family burying place was in 
Union Cemetery, the younger members of the 
family owning crypts in the mausoleum in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery. 

As indicated above, Benjamin Smith Grogg is a 
man of progressive ideas, many of which he has 
introduced in the management of his farm. He 
merely superintends, however, having a capable 
tenant, for Mr. Grogg has not been an agriculturist 
all his life, in fact has been something of a traveler 
and perhaps has seen more of the western part of 
the United States than the majority of his neigh- 
bors. He has been in every state west of the Missis- 
sippi River and has traveled the whole length of 
Canada frorn Detroit to Vancouver, spending time 
in both mining and logging camps. He made the 
round trip from DeKalb County to the Pacific 
Coast four times while his parents were living. In 
these years of travel he has met with accident and 
adventure. At one time he was confined in a hos- 



pital at Santa Fe, New Mexico, for eighty-four 
days. Like most men who have really done brave 
things, he is modest in telling of them. On one oc- 
casion he undertook the dangerous task of crossing 
the Columbia River on thin ice in order to carry 
a telegram to a family announcing the death of a 
soldier son in the barracks at Vancouver, being the 
only man to volunteer for this hazardous mission. 
He succeeded in crossing the cracking ice on Nor- 
wegian snow shoes, but had to remain at his des- 
tination for a week on account of the breaking ice, 
and then returned by means of a row boat. 

Mr. Grogg owns a well tilled farm with excep- 
tional improvements. His residence is of cement 
blocks, with sanitary plumbing and a heat, light and 
water system and with separate apartments for 
himself and for his tenant and family, the latter 
being Guy Myers, who married Gladys Grogg, a 
relative. They make Mr. Grogg exceedingly com- 
fortable and he passes the most of his time at 
Progressive Farm. By careful plan he has the 
barn basement adapted to the care of livestock, 
having ample room and crib capacity, with a stor- 
age tank for water in the bank driveway, gravity 
forcing the water in a constant stream by the open- 
ing of a valve. When the wind pump fails, there 
is a gasoline engine to use in emergency, hence 
water is plentiful at all times, which is one of the 
greatest desideratums in successful agricultural in- 
dustries. 

Mr. Grogg's interest in public affairs is that of a 
well informed, public-spirited citizen. In national 
rnatters he is a zealous republican in his political 
views, but in local campaigns, when some specific 
issue is at stake, he allows himself to follow his 
own good judgment and consider the man rather 
than the party. 

Seth S. Avery. Every community has several 
families which are regarded as most representative 
of its best characteristics, generally because of the 
lives of the founders of them, who by setting up 
high standards have so shaped the morality of the 
neighborhood. Steuben and Otsego townships 
claim the Avery family as belonging to this class 
and to them, and no one living here disputes the 
fact that Jesse Whitcomb Avery and his beloved 
wife, Eliza (Shumaker) Avery, exerted a powerful 
influence for good in this part of Steuben County. 
They were quiet, unostentatious people, who by the 
very simplicity and sincerity of their lives impressed 
their assoicates with their goodness and natural 
wisdom, and they so brought up their children that 
the present generation are being trained in the same 
admirable manner. 

Seth S. Avery, the third born in their family, is 
one of the substantial men of his community, and 
is numbered among the reliable farmers and business 
men of Otsego Township. He was born in this 
township, July 28, 1859. A man of unusual intel- 
lectual development, Mr. Avery realized the im- 
portance of pFacing in definite form some record 
of the several old families from which he sprung, 
and in 1905, while both his parents were in full 
possession of their faculties, he led them to talk 
of their ancestors, setting down all the facts as 
he learned them. These facts he has embodied in 
a very interesting pamphlet from which the fol- 
lowing has been gleaned. 

The Avery family is of English descent, and 
documents in the family prove that it was located 
in the American Colonies many years ago. The 
first of the Averys of whom there is definite men- 
tion is Samuel Avery, who died in Dearborn Town- 
ship, Kennebec County, Maine, where he had been 
married to Sarah Fall, and where their four children 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



were born. These children were as follows : John 
Hutcherson, of whom mention is made below; 
Amanda, who married Alexander Britton, and they 
had two danghters, Betsy and Emily ; Dolly, who 
married David Chard, and they had the following 
children : George, Sarah, Susan, Amanda, Lydia 
and Rhoda ; and Sarah, who married John K. 
Van Fleet, and they had the following children : 
Joshua, Samuel, John, Elizabeth, Anna, Ruth, Mal- 
vina and Thomas. Mrs. Sarah (Fall) Avery was 
a woman of strong character, and after the death 
of her husband she sought better opportunities for 
her children, first in Marion County, Ohio, and 
later in Steuben County, Indiana, arriving in the 
latter during the fall of 1836. Not long after she 
had located in Otsego Township she was married 
to George Quick, and they had two sons, Avery 
and Henry. Mrs. Avery was a sister of the mother 
of Aaron Taylor, another of Steuben County's 
prominent men. 

John H. Avery, a son of Samuel and Sarah 
(Fall) Avery, was married first to Maria Whit- 
comb, and after her death, at the age of twenty-five 
years from dropsy, caused by the birth of her 
second child, Maria, who died at birth, he was 
married to his sister-in-law, Louisa Whitcomb. In 
addition to the infant daughter who did not sur- 
vive, John H. Avery had by his first marriage a 
son, Jesse Whitcomb, and he was the father of Seth 
S. Avery, and was born February 18, 1833, at Big 
Island, Marion County, Ohio. 

The Whitcomb family is another old established 
one of this country. Major Benjamin Whitcomb 
having served his country during the American 
Revolution, and as he was the father of Maria 
(Whitcomb) Avery, and consequently the grand- 
father on the maternal side of Jesse Whitcomb 
Avery, he was entitled to a life pension from the 
government. In fact his papers were placed in 
order and had it not been for the outbreak of the 
Civil war, and its long continuance, he would have 
doubtless received it. As it was this still remains 
an unpaid claim. 

Jesse Whitcomb Avery lost his father in 1840, 
and as his stepmother received all the money left 
by him Mr. Avery only had as his portion an out- 
lawed quit claim deed to real estate which had 
belonged to his paternal grandfather, Samuel Avery, 
and the west half of section 18, township 36, north, 
range 14, east, Steuben County, Indiana. Although 
he was early bereft of a father's protection, his 
grandmother looked after little Jesse Whitcomb 
Avery until a guardian was appointed, and through 
the latter. Elder Miner, an excellent home was 
secured for the lad with James Johnson, grand- 
father of Mrs. Mina (Johnson) Sutherland, of 
Otsego Township. 

On February 19, 1854, Jesse Whitcomb Avery 
was united in marriage with Eliza Shumaker, and 
they located on the farm his father had entered 
from the government many years before, and which 
constituted practically his only inheritance. Here 
they resided for nearly sixty years, and on this 
farm all of their children were born and reared, 
they being as follows: Edward. .Amro, Seth S., 
Mary, who is deceased, Emma, Lida and Jesse 
Whitcomb, who is also deceased. Mr. .\very and 
his wife were born in the same year, and they went 
to school together. Their tastes were similar, and 
they both held in the highest reverence truth, honor 
and upright living. Such a couple could not help 
but diffuse a highly moral atmosphere that was 
felt by all who came within the family circle. 
Children brought up in such a home could not help 
but develop into desirable citizens, for these parents 
did not simply teach the various virtues, they prac- 
ticed them, and never by word or deed lowered 



themselves in the estimation of their children or 
neighbors. Jesse Whitcomb Avery preceded his 
wife into the other world, but they lie side by side 
in the beautiful cemetery of Circle Hill. He died 
at his home in Otsego Township April 28, igi2, 
aged seventy-nine years, two months and ten days, 
and she died November ig, 191 5, aged eighty-one 
years, eleven months and fourteen days. Having 
been for forty-seven years active in the Odd Fellows 
Lodge of Angola, his fraternity was in charge of 
the funeral services. He was a brunette, with 
brown eyes and straight black hair and had a 
Roman nose. His height was five feet, seven 
inches, and his weight was about 145 pounds. He 
died of hardening of the arteries. No man of 
Steuben County ever commanded more respect, and 
he was recognized as the epitome of honesty, 
sobriety and fair dealing. 

His wife, Eliza (Shumaker) Avery, was equally 
notable and is remembered with tender affection 
by many outside her own family who are indebted 
to her for innumerable acts of kindness. She was 
born in Hardy County, West Virginia, December 5, 
1833, and when she died she was the only survivor 
of the nine children born to her parents, Michael 
and Elizabeth (Myers) Shumaker. These children 
were as follows: Lydia, who became Mrs. John 
Raker : Sarah, who became first the wife of Tohn 
Mills and later of Henry Secoir ; John, who mar- 
ried Amanda Chard, mentioned in the records of 
the Avery family; Katie; Rosana ; Amanda, who 
became the wife of Aaron Taylor, also mentioned 
in the Avery records ; George, who became the 
husband of Katherine Lininger, was married first to 
Mary Bland; Eliza, who became Mrs. Avery; and 
Betsy, who became the wife of Henry Secoir, men- 
tioned above. 

A brother of Michael Shumaker, John Shumaker 
married and had five children, namely : Margaret, 
Rachael, John, James and Harvey. A sister of these 
two brothers, Mrs. Mary (Shumaker) McClain, had 
two children, George and Dorcas. 

The Shumaker faiuily. finding the confines of 
the old home in West Virginia too small for the 
young life growing up in it, set forth across the 
country, stopping for a time in Licking County, 
Ohio, which they left in 1845 intending to go to 
the Rock River region in Illinois. However, by 
the time they reached Steuben County the good 
father was so ill that they were forced to stay in 
a little log cabin schoolhouse which stood on the 
present farm of Frank Jackson, but then on the 
old Peter Russell Farm in Steuben Township. Here 
Michael Shumaker died a few days after his arrival, 
but his widow survived him many years, finally 
passing away in Steuben County in 1863. With his 
death the plans of his family were changed, and it 
was decided that they remain in Steuben County. 
They were poor and they worked hard, the girls 
going into the fields and woods and wresting a 
living from nature. Eliza Shumaker became noted 
for her skill in dropping corn, being able to keep 
up with the horse drawing the marker, something 
all men did not accomplish, and she also dug for 
ginseng and other roots which were used for 
medicinal purposes. She also performed all of the 
arduous household tasks of her day, many of which 
are scarcely known to the present generation, and 
developed into one of the finest women God ever 
made. Sweet of disposition, her sunny temperament 
never allowed her to show temper, if she ever even 
felt it. Under the most discouraging circumstances 
she could always detect the silver lining, and she 
did not possess a single selfish thought. With her 
her home and family came first, but she had such 
a superabundance of Christian charity and kindly 



86 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



affection that she was a beneficent presence in her 
community, and children and grandchildren rose up 
to call her blessed. During the last nine years of 
her life she could not be induced to leave her home, 
although no one would have been more welcome 
in the families of her children, and her thoughts, 
freed from domestic burdens, dwelt on beautiful 
subjects, showing that had she been spared some 
of the hardships which fell to her lot she would no 
doubt have developed artistic or literary talents 
of no mean order. Indeed there is no doubt but 
that her son Seth S. Avery inherits his undoubtedly 
clever ideas and literary tastes from his mother. 
When she was a girl educational opportunities were 
not many, and the schools were wide apart, but 
this undaunted young soul would walk two and 
one-half miles each way to school, and then in the 
evening repeat the walk in order to participate in 
the old-fashioned spelling matches, many of which 
she won, for she was a speller hard to "down." In 
her younger years she is described as being a 
blonde, with grey eyes and brown curly hair. In 
height she was five feet, four inches, and weighed 
about the same as her husband, 145 pounds. Her 
death was caused by valvular trouble of the heart. 

Seth S. Avery first attended the public schools 
of Otsego Township, but his parents realizing that 
this son possessed unusual attainments sent him to 
the Angola High School, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1880. Mr. Avery then began teaching 
school during the winter season and attended Hills- 
dale College in the spring and fall for two years. 
Then he turned all of his attention to his educa- 
tional work and was one of the popular instructors 
of the young in Steuben County until ,1892. He 
then began selling fencing for the Peerless Fence 
Company, and is still its representative in this 
locality. He is a member of the Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity of his alma mater. 

Mr. Avery and his sister, Mrs. Swift, live together, 
as he never married, and her late husband, Carl 
Swift, is deceased. Mrs. Lida Swift was born 
Januarv 10, 1867, and she superintends the operation 
of the "farm. Jesse Whitcomb Avery and his wife 
have passed from this life, but the weight of their 
upright and honorable lives remains, and their 
effect upon their contemporaries is going to be felt 
to the third and fourth generation. 

J. Burton Lemmon is member of an old and 
prominent family of Steuben County, and the 
family has an interesting military record. _ Mr. 
Lemmon himself fought as a Union soldier in the 
Civil war, had a son with the colors in the World 
war, while his grandfather was in the War of 1812 
and his own father was a captain of militia in the 
early days. 

Mr. Lemmon was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, 
in Green Creek Township, March 22, 1838, a son 
iof Morris and Lucinda (Rathburn) Lemmon. His 
father was born in New York State in 1813 and 
his mother in the same state in 1820. Their settle- 
ment in Steuben County dates from 1843. The 
land they located on is now owned by Martin Lem- 
mon in Otsego Township, comprising sixty-two and 
a half acres. Morris Lemmon increased his hold- 
ings here until he had 210 acres. Morris Lemmon 
was accompanied on his migration to Indiana by 
his father, John Lemmon. whose wife, a member of 
the Tuttle family, died in Sandusky County, Ohio. 
John Lemmon died in 1847. His four children 
were Morris, David, Laura and Mrs. Luretta Wick- 
wire. Mr. Lemmon did not live long after coming 
to Steuben County, passing away in 1845. His 
widow survived until 1868. Their four children 



were J. Burton, David Riley, Chaplin Brace and 
Henry Clay, the last two now deceased. The 
widowed mother married for her second husband 
David Lemmon, a brother of her first husband, 
and by that union had four children, Lavina, Mor- 
ris A., Mildred and Saxton B. Morris Lemmon 
was a whig in politics and liberal in his religious 
views. 

J. Burton Lemmon grew up on the homestead 
farm, acquired such educational advantages as were 
available, and from youth upward has been a factor 
in the farming affairs of Steuben County. On 
August 7, 1862, at Angola, he enlisted in Company 
H of the Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry, and was 
in the army until honorably discharged June 14, 
1865. He was in the battles of Chickamauga, 
Missionary Ridge, Jonesboro and many of the skir- 
mishes in the Atlanta campaign. He was taken 
prisoner in Georgia in 1864 and for six months was 
confined at Andersonville. Mr. Lemmon has been 
a stanch republican in his political views. 

November 20, 1867, he married Miss Celestia Car- 
ter, a native of Steuben County and daughter of 
Samuel Carter. She died November 22, 1879, the 
mother of three children. Mildred, Zoa and Frank. 
October 20, 1883, Mr. Lemmon married Miss Ma- 
linda Fee. She was born on the farm where she 
and her husband now reside in Otsego Township 
February 28, 1866, and is a daughter of Richard 
and Zilla (Avery) Fee. Her parents came from 
Ohio and settled in Otsego Township in 1856, and 
the farm now occupied by Mr. Lemmon and wife 
has been in the ownership of the Fee family for 
over sixty years. Mrs. Lemmon's mother died in 
ini6. at the age of eigthy-three, while Mr. Fee 
passed away in January, 1870. There were six 
cliildren in the Fee family: Maria, Almina, Dwight, 
Clarinda, Horace G. and Malinda. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon have three children : 
Ruth is the wife of Melvin Updyke and the mother 
of two children, Mildred and Keith. Err married 
Edna Musser, and their children are Harvey Bur- 
ton. Gertrude, Richard Wier, Isabel and Dwight. 
Riley Avery, the youngest child, married Edith 
Rettabaugh and has a daughter, Reva. Riley A. 
was the soldier representative of the family in the 
World war, going into the army in August, 1918, 
and serving at Camp Sherman. 

John W. Palmer began life about the same place 
that many young men of the present day have to 
begin, with hardly better circumstances and with no 
better prospects, and his success is measured in the 
ownership of the Palmer Stock Farm, comprising 
385 acres in York Township, one mile west and one 
mile north of Albion in Noble Countj'. All of this 
he has made by his hard work and good judgment, 
and when taken in connection with his high standing 
as a citizen there are few who would deny that it is 
a complete measure of success and achievement. 

Mr. Palmer was born in Tuscarawas County, 
Ohio, September 15, 1854, son of Henry and Hannah 
(Peffer) Palmer. His father was born in West- 
moreland County, Pennsylvania, August 30, 1828. 
His mother was born in Tuscarawas County, March 
3, 183,=;. They were married on January 11, 1852, 
and five years later, in 1857, arrived in Noble County, 
Indiana. Henry Palmer was one of the well-to-do 
and well thought of men of his generation, and 
before his death owned a farm of 185 acres in Noble 
County. He died January 8, 1894, and his wife 
passed away December 3, 1914. He was a republican 
in politics. Of the five children only two are now 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



87 



living, John \V. and Saloma. The latter is the 
widow of J. G. Steele and lives in York Township. 

John W. Palmer was between three and four years 
old when brought to Noble County, and he has spent 
practically all his life within its limits. As a boy 
he attended the district schools, and learned farming 
under the eye and direction of his father. On 
November 15, 1881, he married Miss Alice Flanagan. 
Mrs. Palmer was born in Allen County, Indiana, 
February 27. 1858, daughter of John and Alice 
( Murphy) Flanagan. She spent her early girlhood 
near Ligonier, and had a district school education. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Palmer moved 
to the old Palmer homestead, and in 1882 he bought 
eighty acres of this farm and has since kept his 
possessions growing and expanding until he now has 
a well proportioned farm of 385 acres, and has built 
the comfortable house and the barns and other stock 
buildings. For a number of years he was a breeder 
of Shorthorn cattle. Mr. Palmer is a stockholder 
in the Farmers Bank at .'Mbion. He is an active 
republican, has served as committeeman and as dele- 
gate to state conventions, and for four years was 
trustee of York Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Palmer had two children : Carlos 
C. and Mabel. Carlos is a graduate of the Albion 
High School and the Fort Wayne Business College, 
spent one year at Purdue University and is now 
field man representing the Iowa Homestead and 
lives at Des Moines, Iowa. He married Addie Kitt 
and has two children, John and Jane. The daughter 
Mabel graduated from the Albion High School and 
married Carl R. Cobbs. She died in July, 1914. 
She became the mother of one child, Kenneth P. 
Cobbs. 

John Wagnek has been a resident of DeKalb 
County for over half a century, spent many industri- 
ous years as a farmer, and is now enjoying his 
well merited comfort and retirement on his home 
place in Franklin Township. 

He was born in Germany October 8, 1842, a son 
of Jacob and Elizabeth (Jacobs) Wagner. His 
parents on coming to America spent a short time 
in Ohio and then settled in Indiana, north of Water- 
loo, and their last years were spent in Franklin 
Township. They were buried at Hamilton, Indiana. 
Both were active members of the Reformed Church, 
and the father voted as a democrat. 

John Wagner is the only one of eight children still 
living. He was twelve years old when he came 
to this country and received most of his education 
in the common schools of Germany. He began 
earning his own living as a youth in DeKalb County 
and has pursued a straightforward and industrious 
career. 

In 1869 he married Catherine .\nthonj', who was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, and was educated in 
the district schools there. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Wagner settled on a farm in DeKalb 
County, and their home life was uninterrupted until 
her death more than thirty years later, in 1901. Mr. 
Wagner still lives on the home farm of eighty acres. 

There were seven children, six of whom are still 
living: Sarilla, wife of John Timbleson ; Lewis; 
Minnie E., wife of William Sanders, of Fort Wayne; 
Charles ; Clarence, who married Lottie Walter and 
has five children, named Homer, Frank, Bessie, John 
and Dorothy, and Vernie, wife of Glenn Moughler, 
of Wilmington Township. Mr. Wagner is a demo- 
crat in politics and has served as a member of the 
Township Advisory Board of Franklin Township. 

MiLO Thompson- has played a varied and useful 
part in the affairs of Steuben County, is a lawyer 



by profession, has been a farmer, is present trustee 
of Millgrove Township, and is one of the best 
known and influential citizens of Orland. 

He was born in Gilead Township of Branch 
County, Michigan, January 8, 1862, a son of Melvin 
and Orsena P. (Brown) Thompson, both natives 
of New York State. His grandfather, James 
Thompson, brought his family from New York to 
Southern Michigan and settled in Branch County 
in the early days. Melvin Thompson after reaching, 
manhood moved over the state line from Branch 
County to Millgrove Township in 1867, and spent 
the rest of his life in that township as a farmer. 
He died in 1907. Milo Thompson has a younger 
sister, Delia, wife of Moses Latta. 

Mr. Milo Thompson grew up on his father's farm 
m Millgrove Township, attended the district schools 
there and later the public schools at Orland. One 
of his early experiences was teaching, a vocation he 
followed for three terms. After that he was a 
farmer m Mdlgrove township and in 1896 left the 
farm and engaged in the practice of law at Bron- 
son m his native Michigan county. He remained 
Vl^u^ ^^ ^^^""^ ^"'^ '" ^901 returned to the farm in 
Millgrove. His home has been at Orland since 
1909, and he is the man consulted by most of the 
people in that community in matters of law and 
he has developed a good practice. Mr. Thompson 
was elected trustee of Millgrove Township in 1908 
and served a term of six years, until 1914. Then 
alter an interim of four years he was again elected 
trustee in 1918 Besides the duties of that office 
he IS clerk of the Village of Orland. Mr. Thomp- 
son IS unmarried, is a member of the Masonic Lodge, 
Star Lodge No. 225, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, at Orland. 

Alfred Haxtz has been a resident farmer of 
Meuben County forty-five years, and since 1890 his 
tarm operations have been conducted on a place 
across the township line between Scott and York 
townships. He is enjoying a well-earned prosperity, 
IS a man of substantial character, and his work 
and activities have commended him to a large 
group of fellow citizens. 

He was born in Williams County, Ohio, December 
20, 1852, a son of Jesse and Mary Ann (Gorman) 
Hantz. His father was born in Wilkesbarre, 
Pennsylvania. His mother was the daughter of 
Abraham Gorman. Jesse Hantz was a Williams 
County farmer, but in the spring of 1865 moved 
to Scott Township, Steuben County, and spent the 
rest of his life there. He was the owner of 240 
acres. He and his wife were members of the 
German Reformed Church. He had a family of six 
children: Sarah, who married Joshua Metz; 
.'\ trcd; Jane, wife of Nicholas Bontrigger: George- 
Eh: and .'Vnna, who died in childhood. ' 

Alfred Hantz attended the public schools of 
Scolt Township and learned his business as a 
farmer while on his father's home. He remained 
at home until the age of twenty-five. 

In 1871 he married Maria Lahman, who died in 
August, 1874. Her only child, Martha, is wife of 
Sherman Goodrich. Thcv had a large familv of 
eight children, named William, Gertrude Maude 
Jessie, Ford, Edith, Herman and Martha. 

March 21, 1875, Mr. Hantz married Mary A 
Kaufman, daughter of Joseph and Anna Kaufman. 
He and his wife had eight children: Jesse, James, 
Fred, .'Knna, Charles, Ella, Robert and Irvin. The 
son Jesse was drowned July 4, 1808. James died 
at the age of fourteen, Fred married Ethel Hemry, 
and they have five children, Clarence, Orville, 
Dorothy, Cecil and Clinton. Anna is the wife of 
Nelson Barron and the mother of two children. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Mildred Mary and Roscoe A. Charles married 
Ethel Krantz, and they have a son, Robert. Irvin 
married Olie Teegardin and has two children, Karl 
W. and Lois Mary. 

Mr. Alfred Hantz in 1873 moved to a tarm m 
the south part of Scott Township and lived there 
until 1890. In that year he removed to his present 
place, where he has 17S acres, ninety-five acres 
being in York Township and eighty acres in bcott 
Township. His house is in York Township while 
his barn is across the road in Scott Township. 
Mr Hantz does general farming and stock raising, 
has remodeled the house and put up many sub- 
stantial buildings. 

George H Webb. The records of the Webb fam- 
ily in Steuben County runs back for over seventy 
years George Webb, representing the third gen- 
eration, has for many years been a successful farmer 
in Jamestown Township, where he was born, and 
beginning with little more than his bare hands and 
with a rented farm he has achieved a position of 
prestige and influence in that community. 

Mr Webb was born March 3. 1872, son of Henry 
and Nancy (Parker) Webb, and a grandson of John 
and Grace (Harrison) Webb. His grandparents as 
well as his father were natives of England. His 
grandfather was a pioneer in Steuben County, rte 
brought his family from England in 1830, lived for 
several years in Michigan, and in about 1845 came 
to Steuben County, where he acquired a large 
amount of land and was very successful in all his 
business affairs. Henry Webb came to manhood in 
Steuben County and in 1850 went with his brother 
Arthur to California. They traveled west by mule 
team, and on returning came back by way ot the 
Isthmus of Panama. He was in the gold mines 
and other districts of California for about hve years. 
On returning to the States Henry Webb began farm- 
ing in Jamestown Township, lived here many years, 
and the last twenty years of his life were spent at 
Angola, where he died in May, ipM- His wife 
passed away in 1916. The children were : Ida, who 
married Theron Summers; Grace, who became the 
wife of Silas Bressler; George; and Edna, who 
married Frank Wert. , j .- • fV,„ 

George Webb acquired his early education m the 
district schools of Millgrove Township, also attended 
school at Angola, and for thirty years has occupied 
his present farm in Jamestown Township, begin- 
ning his independent career as a renter and now 
owning 160 acres. . . 

He has followed general farming and stockrais- 
ing and all the improvements, comprising a set of 
substantial farm buildings, were made under his per- 
sonal direction. ,.. . . 

Mr. Webb married April 3, 1^95, Viimie Lucas, 
a daughter of Thomas Lucas. They have two chil- 
dren ■ Helen Arlene, born in 1904, and died April 
10 1909, and George Harley, born April 16, 1910. 
Mr. and Mrs. Webb are Methodists and members 
of the church at Nevada Mills. 

Thomas Lucas, a retired resident of Orland, was 
for many years a man of conspicuous enterprise in 
the farming and stockraising interests of Steuben 
County. He has been progressive, has sought to 
better conditions in the community as well as those 
affecting his own life and circumstances, and he and 
his family are among the most respected members 
of that community. 

Mr. Lucas was born in Ohio March 21, 1849, a son 
of Israel and Betsey Elizabeth (Bailey) Lucas. His 
mother was born in Ireland. Israel Lucas was born 
July 5, 1795, and his birthplace is of special interest. 
He was born in the stockade at Marietta, Ohio. 



Marietta was the first point of settlement in the 
State of Ohio when the emigrants from New Eng- 
land floated down the Ohio River and established 
their first foothold in the Northwest Territory there. 
When at the age of fourteen his father died the 
responsibility of looking after the rest of the family, 
including two younger brothers and two sisters, 
devolved upon him. He bound out these children 
and then bound himself out. In 1854, when well 
advanced in years, he moved to Waterhouse Cor- 
ners, Kinderhook Township, Branch County, Mich- 
igan, and in 1864 located in Jamestown Township 
of Steuben County, where he spent the rest of his 
life. He and his wife had seven children: James 
H., Robert, Zevolenia, Theodore, Israel, Girard and 
Thomas E. 

Thomas E. Lucas acquired his early education in 
the district schools of Kinderhook, Michigan, also 
attended school at Nevada Mills in Steuben County, 
and during his youth learned the miller's trade. 
He worked five years in the grist mill at Nevada 
Mills, and after that engaged in farming in Mill- 
grove Township. He was on his farm until Feb- 
ruary, 191 5, since which date he has made his home 
in Orland. Mr. Lucas still owns 382 acres in Mill- 
grove Township. For a number of years he was 
recognized as one of the leading sheep raisers in 
Northeastern Indiana, making a specialty of the 
blooded Delaine and Merino sheep. He was a mem- 
ber of the American Sheep Growers' Association. 
It is his distinction to have introduced the culture 
of peppermint in Steuben County, one of the big 
money-making crops in that part of the state. Mr. 
Lucas is affiliated with the Masonic bodies at Or- 
land, including Lodge No. 225, and the chapters of 
the Royal Arch and Eastern Star. 

November 27, 1870, Mr. Lucas married Sarah 
Helen Chrystler, a daughter of Abraham and Martha 
Chrystler. To their marriage were born five chil- 
dren : Vinnie, wife of George Webb ; Ora D., who 
married Ella Showater ; Ella, wife of Elmer Grabell ; 
Jesse E., who married Mattie Murray; and Harley 
S., who married Libby Murray. 

John Oesch. On leaving home and venturing 
upon his own responsibilities John Oesch had about 
$300. His active career as a farmer, spent chiefly 
in LaGrange County, has brought him much to sat- 
isfy his ambition, and he has no fear of the wolf 
at the door nor even of the tax collector. His 
farm in Eden Township is often called the home 
of the Percherons, and his breeding stock of those 
horses represent some of the finest in Indiana. 

He was born in Huron County, Ontario, Canada, 
January 29, i860, a son of Daniel and Barbara 
(Roth) Oesch, the former a native of Canada 
and the latter of Germany, but brought to Canada 
by her parents when only seven years old. They 
were married in Waterloo County, Canada, and in 
1869 moved to Hickory County, Missouri. They 
bought land, but after living there four years 
through some technicality lost title. Daniel Oesch 
then brought his family to Howard County, In- 
diana, locating and living near Kokomo for a year 
and a half. He next moved fifteen miles northeast 
of Fort Wayne and bought forty acres, where he 
spent the rest of his days. He died at the age of 
eighty-one. He and his family were Mennonites 
in religion and in politics after coming to the 
United States he was aligned with the democratic 
party. There are three living children: Christian, 
of Allen County, Indiana; Leah, wife of Joseph 
Delegrange, of Allen County; and John. 

John Oesch lived with his father during the dif- 
ferent moves above recorded and acquired a com- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



mon school education. On leaving home at the age 
of twenty-five he possessed the modest fortune 
above noted. December 18, 1884, he married Mary 
A. Troyer. For a year he rented a farm and then 
bought thirty-four acres, across the road from 
where he lives today. He traded this thirty-four 
acres for seventy-five acres included in his present 
farm. He bought fifteen acres adjoining and also 
has eighty-two and a half acres in Newbury Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Oesch has been a horse breeder for thirty- 
three years. He began with the Clyde horses, 
changing to the Shire, and now for many years 
has been a specialist in the Percheron. In the 
spring of igig he had six registered mares, three 
registered stallions and other young stock, giving 
him thirteen head of full bloods. He is regarded 
as one of the wealthy men of Eden Township. He 
is a stockholder in the State Bank of Topeka and 
also the Farmers State Bank of the same place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oesch had fourteen children, one 
of whom died in infancy. Those still living are: 
Levi, Jennetta, Daniel, Amanda, William, Lester, 
Freeman, Artie, Erma, Chauncey, John and Tru- 
man. The family are members of the Mennonite 
Church. Mr. Oesch is a republican in political 
affiliation. 

Ira Schlotterback. One of the historic colonies 
planted in Noble County in the earliest pioneer days 
comprised several families from the vicinity of 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, including the Engles, 
Hostetters, Wolfes and Teals, all of whom came 
in 1832 and all settled in the same neighborhood, 
living in the midst of wild conditions, with Indians 
as neighbors, and enduring with the patience typical 
of real frontiersmen the hardships of their time. 

One of this group of early settlers was Gideon 
Schlotterback, who was born near Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, in 1812. He was about twenty years 
of age when he came to Noble County, and shortly 
afterward, in the same year, he married Mary Engle, 
member of one of the families just mentioned. 
They settled on a farm, and were long prominent 
and substantial residents of Noble County. Gideon 
Schlotterback as a result of his long continued 
labors accumulated an estate of 440 acres. He and 
his wife had twelve children, three of whom are 
still living: Amelia, wife of C. G. Fait, living in 
North Dakota; Amy, wife of A. B. Koontz, of 
Goshen, Indiana, and Ira. 

Ira Schlotterback was born in Perry Township, 
a mile east of where he now lives, February 10, 
1850. For over forty years he has borne his share 
of responsibilities as a farmer in that locality. His 
farm is located in section 33 of Perry Township 
on the line between that and Sparta Township, 
where he own 136 acres. The first school he at- 
tended was kept in a log schoolhouse, and he lived 
with his parents and helped with the farm work 
until after he was twenty-one years of age. On 
February 11, 1875, he married Sarah J. John. She 
was born at Ligonier, Indiana, November 19, 1854, 
and grew up in Perry Township. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Slotterback managed the old 
farm, and he now lives on what is known as the 
Engle Farm. He is engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. 

He and his wife have the following children: 
Leon is married and lives at Ligonier; Lulu is the 
wife of Eugene Swinehart and lives near Mongo 
in LaGrange County; Thomas is married and lives 
near Noblesville, Indiana; Willis is managing the 
old home place of 136 acres in Sparta and Perry 
townships, is married and is a republican in politics ; 



and Ina, the youngest of the family, is the wife of 
O. G. Bowen, an electrician at Ligonier. 

Pharaoh Hones.s, Steuben County with its 
beautiful topography is an attractive place for 
people to spend their declining years as well as a 
country that repays effort and youthful enthusiasm. 
Pharaoh Honess spent many years of his life in 
the service of the New York Central Lines. When 
he retired from railroading he sought a home in 
the country, and selected his present place in Scott 
Township, where he is carrying on a systematic 
business as a farmer. Mr. Honess is a man of 
interesting personality, and is father of a very 
brilliant and scholarly family. 

He was born in Kent County, England, February 
22, 1852, a son of William and Margaret (Seeley) 
Honess. His parents spent all their lives in Eng- 
land, and in their family of twelve children Pharaoh 
was the third of age. The latter remained at home 
until he was twenty-one years of age, and is largely 
self-educated. Arriving in New York without 
money, he had to make shift to earn a living at 
different occupations for a time, and soon went to 
the vicinity of Cleveland, Ohio. While working 
there in 1875 he studied music in night classes at 
Baldwin University, and spent part of his time 
composing two pieces of music each week for the 
Baldwin University. In 1880 Mr. Honess went to 
work for the New York Centra! Lines, was night 
yard master, was soon made check clerk in the 
freight house, later was waybiller in the office, and 
then bookkeeper and collector and chief clerk. He 
collected millions of dollars for the railroad com- 
pany and never filed a bond. After twenty years 
of faithful and efficient service he resigned and in 
April, 1900, came to Steuben County and bought 
thirty-eight and one-half acres of land where he 
lives in Scott Township. He has since added ten 
acres, and has made a good home and made a 
living as a farmer and stock raiser. He keeps a 
small herd of Shorthorn cattle. Mr. Honess is a 
member of the Congregational Church. 

July 5, 1884, Mr. Honess married Anna Riddles. 
She was born at Cuyahoga, near Cleveland, August 
20, 1863, a daughter of William and Sarah 
(Nichols) Ford. Her father was born in Kent 
County, England, in 1804, and her mother in Broome 
County, New York, in 1822. The family settled in 
Cuyahoga County, Ohio, where her father died in 
1886 and her mother in 1804. Both were laid to 
rest in the Monroe Street Cemetery of Cleveland. 
Mrs. Honess' father was in the meat business at 
Cleveland for many years and later was a farmer. 
Mrs. Honess was one of four children: Charles, 
deceased ; Edward, of Lorain, Ohio ; Mary, de- 
ceased ; and Anna. A half sister of Mrs. Honess 
is Mrs. Sarah Dunham, of Angola. 

Mr. and Mrs. Honess have five children. Charles, 
the oldest, born June 28, 1885, was educated at 
Berea in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, also at the Angola 
High School, and graduated from Oberlin College, 
Ohio, in 191 2. He won a scholarship in Cornell 
University, where he took his Master's Degree in 
1913. He also won scholarships at Yale and the 
University of Chicago and received a Fellowship 
in Columbia University. He is now geologist for 
the State of Oklahoma. He is a member of the 
Sigma Psi Chi Fraternity. Arthur P. Honess, the 
second son, was born August 10, 1887, is a graduate 
of the Angola High School, finished his work at 
Oberlin College in 1914, and won a Fellowship in 
Princeton University, valued at $1,000 a year. He 
remained in Princeton three years, receiving his 
Master of Arts Degree. He has since been con- 



90 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



nected with the Pennsylvania State College, where 
he is now professor of mineralogy and of other 
subjects. The third child, Edith, born January 21, 
1893, is a graduate of Angola High School, grad- 
uated from Oberlin College in June, 1918, and is 
now teacher of science in the Scott Township High 
School. Thus Mr. Honess' three oldest children 
have achieved when still young noteworthy dis- 
tinction in the field of scholarship. The fourth 
child, Clayton, was born March 19, 1895, completed 
the grammar school work and is a mechanic. He 
was drafted in the World war, went into the army 
in July, 1918, as a private and was promoted to 
top sergeant in the Heavy Artillery. He received 
his honorable discharge in January, 1919- Leon 
Honess, the youngest of the family, was born m 
November, 1904, and is now in the freshman year 
of the Scott Township High School. 

Herbert Fenton Newnam. It has been said that 
at no time in history has opportunity been so bounti- 
ful to the tenant farmer and renter as within the 
last two or three years. The estate of Herbert 
Fenton Newnam is one which shows what was 
possible to the industrious and capable farm tenant 
in the years of more restricted opportunity, since 
he made steadv progress and while a tenant bought 
and paid for a farm of his own, which he still oc- 
cupies and which gives him a place among the fore- 
most agriculturists of Noble County. 

Mr. Newnam, whose home is in the northwest 
corner of Wayne Township in that county, has a 
lar£;e amount of land under cultivation, and has a 
home equipped with all the modern improvements, 
including a lighting plant and heating system. He 
was born on a farm in Milford Township, La- 
Grange Countv, Indiana, November 10, 1872. His 
parents were Joseph E. and Isadora (Spaulding) 
Newnam. His father was born in Wayne Town- 
ship of Noble County and his mother in Brushy 
Prairie. After their marriage they settled on a 
farm across the road from where Herbert now 
lives, later lived in Ohio two years, and then re- 
turned to Noble Countv. They now reside at 
South Milford. The father is affiliated with Lodge 
No. 380 of Masons, of which he is a past master, 
is also a Knight of Pythias, and is a republican 
in politics. There were just two sons, Herbert F. 
and Vern I. The latter is a machinist with the 
Alliance Steel Foundry at Alliance, Ohio. 

Herbert Fenton Newnam grew up on a farm 
joining the one where he now lives, and attended 
the public schools at South Milford. For three 
years he clerked in a store. On April i, 1895, he 
married Miss Mattie I. Gross. She was born near 
the center of Milford Township in LaGrange 
County April 21, 1870, daughter of William and 
Isabelle (Frances) Gross. She was educated in 
the common schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Newnam 
started housekeeping at Greenfield Mills, lived there 
two years, and at Brushy Prairie one year, and 
then came to the farm which they now own. For 
twenty years they worked and saved as renters, 
and used the proceeds of this long period to buy 
and construct the splendid farm of 334 acres which 
they now own. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newnam have one daughter, 
Grossie Joe, born February 18, 1897. She grad- 
uated from the South Milford High School with 
the class of 1915, and in December of that year 
married John Wible. Mr. Wible was born in Ken- 
dallville, Indiana, graduated from the South Mil- 
ford High School in 1911, and he and his young 
wife lived happily together for only a little more 



than a year, until their marriage was broken by 
his death on January 7, 1917. 

Mr. Newnam is affiliated with Wolcottville Lodge 
No. 380, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, with 
South Milford Lodge No. 619, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past noble grand, 
and has been a member of the Grand Lodge and 
is also a member of the Encampment. Mrs. New- 
nam is a Rebekah and has held all the chief offices 
in that order. The daughter Grossie Joe belongs 
to the Eastern Star Chapter at Wolcottville and 
to the Rebekahs at South Milford. Mr. Newnam 
in politics is a republican. 

S.\MUEL A. Stout. His friends and neighbors 
regard Samuel A. Stout as one of the fortunate men 
of Steuben County, though his good fortune, repre- 
sented in the ownership of what is known as the 
"Otter Lake Stock Farm," has been the product of 
long years of capable management and labor, good 
judgment and that all around character which the 
good farmer represents. 

Mr. Stout was born on the farm which he now 
owns in section 32 of Jackson Township, September 
II, 1859. He is a son of Hervey B. and Sarah 
(Alcott) Stout, his mother a native of Ohio and a 
daughter of Samuel Alcott, who married a Miss 
Collins. Mr. Stout's grandfather, George Stout, 
married for his first wife a Miss Bliss. He was 
an early settler in Michigan, and from that state 
came to Salem Township of Steuben County and 
settled on a farm along the county line between 
Steuben and DeKalb counties, but spent his last 
years in Jackson Township. The children of his 
first marriage were Aaron, Orville, Hervey B., 
George, Edward, Caroline and Nancy. He married 
for his second wife Cassie Shaddock, and they had 
four daughters, named Mary, Anna, Olive and 
Emma. 

Hervey B. Stout, who was born in Lenawee 
County, Michigan, in December, 1827, and died in 
1880, began his career as a farmer in Salem Town- 
ship, lived there several years, and then bought the 
land in Jackson Township comprised in the Otter 
Lake Stock Farm. When it came into his posses- 
sion it was practically all wild land. He cleared 
away a space for his log cabin house and barn 
and made many good improvements before his 
death. He cleared up eighty acres out of the 120. 
He and his wife had eight children : Ellen, wife 
of T. K. Miller; Charles L- ; Jane, who married 
William Lock; Orville M. ; Samuel A.; Lydia A., 
vvfho married M. K, Hall ; Dora B., who became 
the wife of James Parsell; and Frank B. 

Samuel A. Stout had the educational advantages 
supplied by the district schools of Jackson Town- 
ship. When a young man he went out to work 
on farms at monthly wages, and continued in that 
way for eleven years, gaining experience and also 
some meager capital which enabled him to start for 
himself. 

In April, 1892, Mr. Stout married Miss Kate Velie, 
a daughter of Tunis and Margaret (Kroutz) Velie. 
In August following his marriage Mr. Stout came to 
his present farm, and during his proprietorship of 
more than a quarter of a century has erected all the 
substantial buildings, has equipped his place espe- 
cially for stockraising, and now has the ownership 
and supervision of 303 broad acres. 

He and his wife have three daughters, Clara B., 
Ruth M. and Mabel G. The two older daughters 
are both graduates of the Flint High School, and 
Clara is also a graduate of the Tri-State Normal 
College at Angola, and Ruth has spent two terms 
in that institution. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



91 



James D. Rowley is one of the oldest residents 
of Butler Township, DeKalb County, and for nearly 
half a century has been identified with its farming 
interests. His home place is in section 36 of that 
township. 

Mr. Rowley was born in Henry County, Ohio, 
March 23, 1S45, a son of Thomas and Ellen (Davis) 
Rowley. His father and mother were born in 
County Antrim, Ireland, and after their marriage 
came to the United States. They made their first 
home in Henry County, Ohio, where the father 
worked in the construction of the canal between 
Lake Erie and the Ohio River, and his wife boarded 
other workmen. Later he followed different lines 
of emplojment in Illinois and Southwestern Indiana, 
and eventually settled in Jackson Township of De- 
Kalb County, where he and his wife spent the rest 
of their years. As a farmer he cleared up eighty 
acres of land. He was a democrat, and he and his 
wife were faithful Catholics. Of their eight children 
three are still living : James D., Catherine, wife of 
Samuel Surface, and John, of Fort Wayne. 

James D. Rowley grew up from early boyhood 
in Jackson Tow'nship, attended public schools, and 
has made industry the keynote of his life and by 
that means has found prosperity sufficient for all 
his requirements. He is still engaged in general 
farming and stock raising and owns 215 acres in 
Jackson and Butler townships. He and his family 
are members of the Catholic Church. 

Mr. Rowley myried Ella Surface on February 
23, 187 1. They have nine living children, named, 
Thomas, Charles, Carl, Elizabeth, Catherine, Mabel, 
Grace, Walter and Ralph. The son, Carl, is a phy- 
sician at Boston. Massachusetts ; Elizabeth is the 
wife of Martin Schaaf, of Fort Wayne; Catherine 
is the wife of Thomas Kavanaugh, and Mabel is 
the wife of Forest Sheets. 

EuGENB Van Auken. 'Some of the thrifty char- 
acter of his ancestors has been exemplified by 
Eugene Van Auken in the management of his farm- 
ing enterprise in Otsego Township of Steuben 
County. He is one of the men who make farming 
pay, and does so by able and progressive manage- 
ment of every detail. 

Mr. Van Auken was born in Steuben Township 
September 23. 1872. and is a son of Elton and Sarah 
(Dutter) Van Auken and a grandson of Everet 
Van Auken. This is one of the oldest and most 
prominent family names in Steuben County. Elton 
Van Auken was born in Portage County, Ohio, and 
his wife in Pennsylvania, a daughter of George and 
Anna Dutter. Elton Van Auken as a young man 
worked in a freight house at -Angola, but aside 
from that experience spent his life as a farmer in 
Steuben Township. His children were Lena, 
Eugene, Paul and Carl E. Only Eugene and Carl 
are now living. 

Eugene Van Auken attended public school at 
Angola and the district schools of Steuben Town- 
ship, and has been farming steadily since early 
manhood. In 1897 he moved to Otsego Township, 
and for seven j-ears rented land. His present pros- 
perity is the more creditable for the fact that he 
began with a minimum of capital and proved his 
ability as a renter before he became an independent 
owner. In IQ04 he bought his present place of 120 
acres in sections i and 12. He has kept improve- 
ments steadily going forward, and even in the 
midst of war times in the summer of 1918 he built 
a large bank barn, 40 by 80 feet, one of the best 
barns in the township. 

Mr. Van Auken is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Metz. He married No- 
vember 2, 1893, Dora George, a daughter of Robert 



and Ann (Smith) George. They have two children, 
Ralph and Mildred. 

Otis G. Gates is proprietor of a farm in Otsego 
Township of Steuben County around which the 
associations of the Gates family center covering a 
period of over three quarters of a century. Mr. 
Gates is able to appreciate the remarkable changes 
and transformations made in the seven decades 
since his grandparents settled here. As he goes 
about his fields he doubtless often thinks and is 
grateful for the labors done by the earlier genera- 
tions, and his own career has been a part of the 
substantial character of the Gates family. 

He was born on this farm October 25, 1864, a 
son of Ransom and Abbie (Ellis) Gates and a 
grandson of Levi and Sallie Gates. Levi Gates 
brought his family from New York State in 1840. 
Their place of settlement was in the midst of the 
heavy woods of Otsego Township. Indians were 
still found in that locality, and wild animals 
abounded in the woods. Levi Gates built a log 
house for the shelter of his family. On the east 
side of a big tree he put up a shelter which he 
called a barn, the trunk of the tree forming one 
side of that structure. He pursued his industrious 
labors until called away by death a few years after 
coming to the county. His wife survived to a good 
old age. Ransom Gates was born in New York 
State in 1834. He grew up on the home farm, 
attended the primitive district schools, and during 
his mature career followed a busy life as a farmer 
and threshermsn. He owned 130 acres of the farm 
now occupied by his son Otis. He died in 191 1. 
He was a republican and a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. His wife, who was born 
in Ohio in 1837, died in 1913. Their children were 
five in number: Van Rennselaer, who died in in- 
fancy, Blanche, Otis, Pearl and Burr. 

Otis G. Gates attended the public schools when 
a bo}', learned farming under his father, and is now 
proprietor of 170 acres, devoted to good crops and 
good livestock. Mr. Gates is a republican and 
attends the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

August 22, 1886, he married Miss Sarah Den- 
man. She was born near Rome City in Noble 
County, a daughter of Smith and Nancy Denman, 
early settlers in that section of Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gates have two children, Blanche and Glenn. 
Blanche is the wife of Blaine Willoughby, living 
on the Gates farm, and their children are Celeta, 
Gaylor and Ivan. Glenn, who is also on the farm 
with his father, married Gladys Burkhart, of Wil- 
liams County. Ohio, and their two children are 
Otto and Max. 

Harvey C. Knight. While not the wealthiest 
man in Steuben County, Harvey C. Knight enjoys 
the ownership of a good farm, has paid for it out 
of his own efforts, and his record proves that he has 
been thoroughly able to fight his own battles and 
take care of himself and those dependent upon him. 
What he has he has earned, and beginning as a 
farm laborer he has steadily progressed toward the 
goal of independence. 

Air. Knight was born in Steuben Township of 
Steuben County March 8, 1867, a son of Austin and 
Mary Ann (Dahoff) Knight. His mother was a 
daughter of Peter Dahoff. Austin Knight was born 
in Stark County, Ohio, and came to Steuben County 
about 1858. For several years he was employed 
grubbing stumps and splitting rails. He then fol- 
lowed the carpenter's trade until 1872. and since then 
has been a busy blacksmith, being proprietor of a 
well patronized shop at Pleasant Lake. He and his 



92 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



wife had six children: Ella, who died in child- 
hood; Harvey; Emma; Elizabeth; Herman, who 
died when about five years old; and Charles, who 
died at the age of six months. 

Harvey C. Knight acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Pleasant Lake and was a boy 
helper to his father in the blacksmith shop, though 
he never took up that as a regular trade or occu- 
pation. For about twelve years he worked for 
farmers and other employers at monthly wages, and 
his next advancement was to renting farms, and in 
November, 1891, he bought his first property m 
Pleasant Lake. Five years later he bought sixteen 
and two-thirds acres in Steuben Township. This 
land had no improvements or buildings. He built 
a barn there in 1898 and about the same time ac- 
quired another forty acres. He had several other 
deals in real estate and in 1906 sold his property in 
Steuben Township and bought his present place of 
120 acres in Millgrove Township. He and his fam- 
ily lived there since 1907, and he has used his land 
for general farming and stockraising purposes. His 
farm is in sections 27 and 28 of Millgrove Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Knight married in iqoi Rosa Webb, a daugh- 
ter of Arthur and Rosa (Case) Webb. Her father 
was born in England and came to Steuben County 
about 1845. Some further reference to the Webb 
family wifl be found on other pages. Mrs. Knight 
is a member of the Methodist Church. She was 
the mother of five children : Bertice, who died at 
the age of four months; Walter, Vira, Myrlen, and 
Albert. 

Albert S. Hill. No man in Noble County stands 
higher in general esteem than Albert S. Hill, a sub- 
stantial farmer of Wayne Township and with many 
interests that identify him with the life and affairs 
of that community. Mr. Hill's farm is in section 13 
of Wayne Township. 

He was born in Noble County November 16, 1865, 
son of Nicholas and Mary (Kinney) Hill. Nich- 
olas Hill was born in Germany in 1824 and was six- 
teen years of age when his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Simon Hill immigrated to America and established 
their home in the wilderness of Noble County, In- 
diana. Nicholas Hill grew up there and spent his 
life as a successful farmer. He died April 5, 1902. 
He and his wife had the following children: Mary, 
unmarried; Lawrence, deceased; Arvilla, wife of 
William Wright, of Kendallville; Orange L., a 
farmer on the old homestead; Wilbur H. ; Charles 
R., of Richmond, Indiana; Albert S. ; Rilla, who 
died in 1918, the wife of Gottlieb Snyder. The 
father married for a second wife Frances Zim- 
merman, but her only child is deceased. 

Albert S. Hill grew up on the old farm which 
was entered by his grandfather from the Govern- 
ment. He was educated in the district schools and 
was at home until after his marriage. September 30, 
1886, he married Miss Emma C. Hovarter. She 
was born in DeKalb County, Indiana, November II, 
1866, daughter of Jacob and Mary Hovarter, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of 
Germany, but brought to the United States when 
only eight years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hill realized their ambitions after 
much denial and struggle and hard work. For seven 
years they were farm renters and moved to their 
present well kept farm in 1904. Mr. Hill owns 180 
acres, and all of it represents what he and his 
wife have gained since their marriage. They have 
two children: Verne R., born October 22, 1889, is 
a graduate of the common schools, is a farmer in 
Noble County, but by his marriage to Cora M. 
Uhl has two children, Ruth May and Don A. Rus- 



sell J., the second child, is a graduate of the com- 
mon schools and married September 11, 1918, Leone 
Lasho. 

Mrs. Hill is a member of the Methodist Church 
at Wayne Center. Mr. Hill is affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees Tent No. 52. Politically 
he has always been a steadfast republican. He uses 
his farm as a means of extensive operations in cattle 
buying and feeding. He buys carloads of sheep and 
cattle, feeds them for market on his farm, and 
thus does a larger stock business than the size of his 
farm would justify if he handled his animals through 
every stage of growth and development. He is also 
a stockholder in the Kendallville Fair Association. 

JosF.PH M. Shew was one of the citizens of Noble 
County whose memory deserve to be cherished long 
among his former associates and in the permanent 
records of the county. He was a man of great 
enterprise and usefulness, though physically a crip- 
ple, and did a great service as a teacher, an occupa- 
tion he followed many years, and also at one time 
held the office of county treasurer. 

He was born in Ohio May 21, 1841, and came 
with his parents to Noble County, Indiana, when a 
boy. The family located in York Township, three 
miles north of Albion, and in that locality he grew 
up, attending the common schools and also the 
college at Wolcottville. He had a well trained mind, 
and used it as a teacher in the public schools of 
this county for twenty-eight terms. All the time 
he was teaching he lived on the farm. In i88q he 
was elected county treasurer, and filled that office 
with signal ability for four years. He was always 
active as a republican and was a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Albion. 

He married for his first wife Melissa A. Niles, 
who died at the age of twenty-six. She was the 
mother of two children : Clarence W., cashier in 
Campbell & Felters Bank at Kendallville, and 
Bertha, wife of Clyde Bowman, a resident of Chi- 
cago. Mr. Shew married for his second wife Mrs. 
Almeda (Deater) Spencer, widow of Cliflford 
Spencer. Mrs. Shew, who is still living in Washing- 
ton Township, on the farm of no acres, which is 
cultivated by renters, was born at Albion, Indiana, 
in i860. By her first husband, Cliflford Spencer, she 
had one son, who died at the age of fourteen months. 
Mrs. Shew is the mother of three children : Paul 
N.. a mechanic at Warsaw. Indiana; Leila, wife of 
Floyd Fetters, of Noble County ; and William B., 
who lives with his mother. Mrs. Shew is a member 
of the Baptist Church and is affiliated with the 
Rebekah Lodge 

JoRDEN Priest, owner of a good farm in section 
17 of Washington Township in Noble County, was 
thrown upon his own resources at an early age, 
has fought the battles of life for himself ever since, 
and has earned material success and at the same 
time the substantial esteem of a large community. 

He was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 11, 
1855. son of George and Mary (Smith) Priest. 
His' parents were also natives of Licking County, 
and George Priest spent all his life in Ohio as a 
farmer. After his death his widow married Mat- 
thew Wright, and they came to Noble County, 
Indiana, where she died. She was an active member 
of the United Brethren Church. George Priest 
and wife had nine children, five of whom are de- 
ceased, and the four living are: Allen, a farmer 
in Sparta Township of Noble County; George, a 
retired farmer at Kimmell ; Jorden ; and Olive, wife 
of Lewis Schlabach. 




lOSEPH M. SHKW 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Jorden Priest had opportunities to attend school 
in Ohio until he was about thirteen years old. At 
that age, in 1868, he left home and coming to 
Indiana accepted any opportunity for honorable 
employment that would give him a livelihood. He 
worked out on farms and continued in that way 
until past thirty years of age. 

On November 28, 1889. he married Luella Pren- 
tice. She was born in Sparta Township of Noble 
County December 16. i860, daughter of Nathaniel 
and Catherine (Rice) Prentice. Her father was 
born in New York State July 8, 1808, and her 
mother in Pennsylvania in 1822. Both the Rice 
and Prentice families were early settlers in Noble 
County, and Nathaniel and Catherine after their 
marriage settled on a farm in Sparta Township and 
spent the rest of their days there. Both were 
active church members and Nathaniel Prentice for 
many years dispensed local justice as a justice of 
the peace. He was a democrat in politics. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Priest settled 
on their present farm of eighty acres, and have 
since achieved independence and prosperity. They 
have one daughter, Mary C, who is a graduate of 
the common schools and of the Cromwell High 
School. She is now the wife of Oscar Correll, of 
Washington Township. Mr. and Mrs. Priest have 
one grandchild, Charles Edward. The family are 
members of the United Brethren Church and Mr. 
Priest is a steward, while his wife has been super- 
intendent of the Sunday school for nearly thirty 
years. Politically he votes as a democrat, but 
never interests himself in politics beyond that. 

Tobias V. Yoder. At one time Tobias V. Yoder 
was known as a diligent and ambitious young farm 
hand, but long since he raised himself above that 
status into that of an independent farm owner 
and today he is regarded as one of the largest land 
owners and most extensive farmers and stock men 
in LaGrange County. His home place is in section 
2 of Eden Township, known as the General Grain 
Farm, a place of 231 acres. That, however, is only 
part of his e.xtensive holdings. 

He was born in Eden Township April g, 1870, a 
son of Valentine T. and Catherine (Schrock) Yoder. 
His parents were both born at Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, his father September 23, 1842, and his 
mother in March, 1843. His father died April 10, 
1913, and his mother July 23. 1918. Both the Yoder 
and Schrock families came to Indiana in early 
days, the former settling in Newbury Township 
and the latter in Eden Township of LaGrange 
County. Valentine Yoder after his marriage set- 
tled in section 4 of Eden Township, and spent the 
rest of his life there. He and his family were 
members of the Amish Mennonite Church. Of nine 
children eight are still living; John H., a farmer 
in Clear Spring Township ; Tobias V. ; Daniel V., 
a farmer in Clay Township ; Joseph E., of Eden 
Township; Moses V. and Levi L., both of New- 
bury Township; Henry H., of Eden Township; 
and Gertie, wife of Joseph Hooley, of Newbury 
Township. 

Tobias V. Yoder grew up on the home farm and 
attended the district schools to the age of fifteen. 
The following si.x years he worked as a hand for 
his father, and at the age of twenty-one had a 
team and some other property, which he used to 
run his father's farm for seven years. He then 
bought, rented, and for many years has lived at 
his present location. He began his land accumula- 
tions with 184 acres, and now owns 805 acres in 
LaGrange County, besides 160 acres in Kansas and 
240 acres in Oklahoma. Through all the years he 



has made much of his income by livestock. Mr. 
Yoder is a democrat and he and his family are 
active in the Amish Mennonite Church. 

To him and his wife were born ten children, 
and the eight now living are: Lydia A., wife of 
David Christner; Lizzie, wife of Emanuel P. Mil- 
ler; Rosa, widow of Brice Elliott; Rufus T., Valen- 
tine T., Mina E., Milo T. and Amsey T., all of 
whom are at home. 

George W. Logan. The record of George W. 
Logan, of Clear Lake township, Steuben County, 
is that of a successful farmer, a man who has made 
his own way in the world, and out of his industry 
and good management has achieved material circum- 
stances and civic esteem worthy of his many years 
of well directed efforts. 

Mr. Logan was born in Clear Lake Township 
October 26, 1870, a son of Robert and Caroline 
(Ovenhouse) Logan. His father was born in Wil- 
liams County, Ohio, in 1827, and his mother in 
Seneca County, Ohio, in 1838. They were married 
in that state and in 1869 came to Clear Lake Town- 
ship, where they established a home on fifty acres 
of land. The father died there in the midst of his 
labors in 1877, and his wife in 1874. He was a 
democrat in politics. Their children were Lizzie, 
Samuel, Maggie (deceased), Thomas, Lettie, George 
W., and Clyde. 

George W. Logan was only four years old when 
his mother died and seven when his father passed 
away. After that he grew up in the home of his 
sister Maggie, wife of Frank McElhenie.. From the 
McElhenie home he attended the neighboring dis- 
trict schools and was early schooled in habits of 
industry and thrift. For a number of years he 
earned monthly wages. In 1894 he went out to 
Nebraska, worked there for three years and then 
bought 160 acres and rented other land. He was 
in Nebraska about seven years, and on returning to 
Steuben County in 1901 bought forty acres. He 
has since added another forty and has his farm 
well improved with good buildings and is doing a 
prosperous business. 

Mr. Logan is a republican, and while living in 
Nebraska was affiliated with the Modern Woodmen 
of America. On October 26, 1893, he married Miss 
Alma Court. She was born in Salem Township of 
Steuben County in February, 1870, a daughter of 
Orrin and Mary (Brinker) Court. Her parents 
came to Steuben County from Marion County, Ohio, 
during the '60s. They settled in Salem Township 
and in 1873 moved to York Township, where her 
father^ died in 1887, at the age of fifty-four. Mrs. 
Logan's mother is still living and is now eighty-one 
years of age. In the Court family were ten chil- 
dren, named Fannie, Emma, John, Mary, Martha, 
Alma, George, William, Isora and Curtis. Mr. and 
Mrs. Logan have one son, Robert Q., born Mav 4, 
1907. 

Greely M. Zimmerman. Probably no one name 
has been longer or more continuously associated with 
the mercantile enterprise of Ligonier than that of 
Zimmerman. Sixty years ago one of the leading 
stores of the village, it was conducted by Jacob C. 
Zimmerman, and until recently one of "the largest 
establishments patronized by the general public had 
as one of the proprietors Greely M. Zimrnerman. In 
this enterprise he was associated with his brother 
and sister. In September, 1918, they closed out the 
business and are now engaged in real estate opera- 
tions and looking after various properties they own. 
In many other ways he has been actively identified 
with the social and civic affairs of his home city, and 
is one of the most popular citizens. 



94 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



He was born in Albion, Indiana, October 23, 1855, 
a son of Jacob C. and Sarah J. (Brown) Zimmer- 
man. His father was born in Switzerland in 1827, 
and was brought to the United States when four 
years old, growing up in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. 
He first came to Indiana and located in Elkhart 
Township in 1849, and was married in this county. 
His wife was a native of Ohio. For about five 
years Jacob Zimmerman was clerk in a store at 
Albion, Indiana, and in 1857 moved to Ligonier, 
where he engaged in business for himself. He was 
a merchant almost half a century, until his death 
in 1903. In politics a republican, at one time he 
represented the counties of Elkhart and Noble in 
the State Legislature. . He is the type of citizen 
who is frequently selected for places of trust and 
responsibility. He served eight j-ears as trustee of 
Perry Township, and was also a member of the town 
council. He was a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite Mason, and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. Jacob Zimmerman and wife had seven 
children, four of whom died in infancy. The three 
still living are: Greely M. ; Frank W. ; and Venona 
J., wife of S. C. Sackett. 

Greely M. Zimmerman was two years old when his 
parents moved to Ligonier, and he grew up in that 
city, acquiring his education in the public schools. 
At the age of fifteen he took his place in his 
father's store, and had an uninterrupted career of 
business activity for nearly fifty years. He owns 
one-third of all the Zimmerman estate properties, 
also has other real estate, and has two farms aggre- 
gating 346 -acres in Noble County. Like his father 
he has always affiliated with the republican party. 
He served sixteen years as treasurer of the City 
of L'gonicr. He is prominent in Masonry, being 
affiliated with the lodge. Royal Arch Chapter, Coun- 
cil and Commandery, and also the Scottish Rite Con- 
sistory. He is a past illustrious master of Ligonier 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, No. 59, and for 
the past twenty-six years has been treasurer of his 
lodge, council and cliapter. He is also affiliated with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

_ Mr. Zimmerman has two children by his first mar- 
riage : Beulah Z., a graduate of high school and 
wife of Henry D. Stone, living in Los Angeles, 
California; and Bonnie, wife of Capt. Charles A. 
Green, of Tampa, Florida. In TQ09 Mr. Zimmer- 
man married for his present wife Mrs. Sarah A 
Baker Ward, a daughter of William H. Baker, of 
Goshen, Indiana. 

Charles E. Piper. For over thirtv vears Charles 
E. Piper has been working his way steadily toward 
prosperity and improved conditions for himself and 
family, and is noted as one of the leading farmers 
in Washington Township of Noble County. He 
owns a fine farm in section 11 of that township, 
his acreage comprising eighty-eight and twelve-one 
hundredths, devoted to the staple crops and live- 
stock. 

Mr. Piper was born in the same township October 
3. 1S62, son of George and Samantha (Shelpman) 
Piper. His father was born in Springfield, Ohio, 
in 1828, and his mother in Pickaway County, Ohio, 
in 1830. Her parents died when she was a small 
girl, and her uncle. Doctor Jones, brought her to 
Noble Township and gave her all the advantages 
of his home, sending her to school, and she re- 
mained with the Jones family until her marriage. 
George Piper and wife settled on a farm, and 
remained identified with agriculture until his death 
on September 14, 1907. His widow is still living. 
George Piper was at one time one of the largest 
farmers in Noble County, his operations being con- 



ducted on 600 acres. He was especially a stock 
farmer. He finally divided his land among his 
children. He was active in every moral and religious 
cause, served for a number of years as a trustee 
of Washington Township, and one term as a mem- 
ber of the Board of County Commissioners, and 
during that term the present courthouse was con- 
structed. He was also prominent in republican 
politics. He and his wife had eight children, six 
of whom are still living; Charles E. ; William H., 
of Washington Township; Addie, wife of Harry 
Miller; George P., of Whitley County, Indiana; 
Dora, wife of Clarence Shew; and Delia, wife of 
Harry Beasley. 

Charles E. Piper grew up in the atmosphere of 
his father's large farm and early became acquainted 
with farm management and stock raising on an 
extensive scale. He contented himself with a com- 
mon school education, and on January 10, 1885, 
established a home of his own by his marriage to 
Viola Breninger. She was a dau.ghter of Daniel 
and Sarah Breninger, who died when she was a 
small girl, and she lived in the home of her sister 
until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Piper after their 
marriage lived on a place south of their present 
home, and since the fall of 1885 have had their 
home associations in one spot, and from that home 
and farm have radiated many influences and efforts 
that have been of benefit to the community. Mr. 
Piper is a stockholder in the Sparta State Bank, 
in the Kimmell State Bank and in the Ligonier 
Farmers and Merchants Trust Company. He is a 
republican, is serving as township assessor, and is 
a member of the Township Advisory Board. Mrs. 
Piper is a member of Stringtown Christian Church. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge at Wolf Lake and with Cromwell 
Lodge of Masons. 

They have two children. Ray, a graduate of the 
common schools, married Ethel Humes and lives 
on the farm with his father. Jennie is the wife 
of Samuel H. Galloway, of Sparta Township. 

Andrew J. Raber is one of the quiet, unassuming 
citizens but thoroughly successful farmer in Noble 
County. He has acquired by dint of much e.xertion 
and long continued years of .good management one 
of the good farms of Orange Township, located 
south of Rom.e City. 

He was born in Portage County, Ohio, in June, 
1849, son of Daniel and Alary (Dice) Raber. Both 
parents were born in Ohio, the mother in Trum- 
bull County. After their marriage in that state 
they cJfme to Indiana in 1854 and identified them- 
selves with the new community of Orange Town- 
ship in Noble County. Here the father after ten 
}^ears of hard work in making a farm passed away 
in 1864 at the age of fifty. His widow survived 
him many years and died in Minnesota at the age 
of ninety-two. They had four children : Joel D., 
of California; Andrew J.; Saloma, widow of Carl 
Risch; and Amos O., of California. 

Andrew J. Raber was five years old when brought 
to Noble County, and his memories of Orange 
Township go back fully fifty years. He attended 
the district schools of those days, and also com- 
pleted a course in the National Normal University 
at Lebanon, Ohio. For a time he was a teacher, 
doing his first work in that line in LaGrange 
County and later for four terms conducted a 
school in Noble County. With that exception his 
career has been that of a practical and progressive 
farmer. March 29, 1877, Mr. Raber married Miss 
Clara M. Dyer. After their marriage they rented 
for several years in Orange Township, and by hard 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



95 



work and careful saving then negotiated the pur- 
chase of sixty acres. Later they traded this for 
the farm where they now live and which contains 
eighty acres of well cultivated land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raber have five living children: 
Schuyler M., a graduate of the Huntington Business 
College in Indiana and now a traveling salesman 
with headquarters at Grand Rapids, Michigan; 
Henry F. is also a graduate of the Huntington Busi- 
ness College and is now manager of a business 
college at Huntington ; Leona is a graduate of 
high school, was formerly a teacher, and is now 
the wife of Grant Burkett, of Rome City; Nellie 
and Ronald E. are both unmarried. Ronald is a 
graduate of high school, and served during the 
war in the United States Navy. He was discharged 
in June, 1919. The family arc members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Rome City. Mr. 
Raber is a republican. 

Charles Motsolf. In a period of about fifty-five 
years a tract of land in Salem Township has under- 
gone great transformation and improvement under 
the ownership of the Motsolf family. Charles Mot- 
solf was only an infant when his father moved 
there, and under his ownership he has carried for- 
ward the work which his father begun, and is now 
one of the prosperous and well circumstanced citi- 
zens of his locality. 

Charles Motsolf was born at Ontario in LaGrange 
County, Indiana, September 12, 1862, a son of Jacob 
and Elizabeth (Noll) Motsolf. His mother was a 
native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of George 
and Nancy (Hall) Noll. George Noll was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1796 and came to Steuben County 
in 1839, living on a farm in section 11 of Salem 
Township until his death in 1862. The Nolls there- 
fore are one of the pioneer families of Steuben 
County. Jacob Motsolf was born in Germany and 
left that country when a young man in 1844. He 
was a cooper by trade and found employment in a 
brewery at Cincinnati. Later he moved to Steuben 
County and after his marriage went to Ontario. 
His wife died there in 1864, leaving seven children: 
Mary, Debold, Eva Jane, Peter, Charles, George 
and Lennie. Of these only two are now living, 
Mary and Charles. 

In the year of his wife's death Jacob Motsolf 
brought his children to Steuben County and bought 
the farm where his son Charles now lives. At the 
time of his death he owned sixty-seven and a half 
acres. He had begun with a log house, and had 
cleared up and put in cultivation a considerable part 
of the land. 

In that locality Charles Motsolf grew to manhood 
and after his education went to work helping his 
father and eventually succeeding to the ownership of 
the homestead. His father a short time before his 
death had built the good home which now adorns 
the farm, and Mr, Motsolf himself has^ added a 
substantial barn to the improvements. Politically he 
is independent and a member of the Reformed Luth- 
eran Church, the same faith which his father prac- 
ticed. 

IMarch 20, 1883, he married Ida Zimmerman, of 
LaGrange County, daughter of Oliver Zimmerman, 
formerly of Noble County. Mr. and Mrs. Motsolf 
have one daughter, Effie, born February 5. 1885, and 
now the wife of David Ritter. Mr. and Mrs. Ritter 
nave a daugliter, Opal, born May 22. 1907. David 
Ritter is a son of David Ritter and grandson of 
Henry Ritter and member of one of the old and 
prominent pioneer families of Steuben Count}'. 

Clement G. Routsong is proprietor of the only 
dry goods store at Wolcottville, and has been a 



popular and successful merchant of that town for 
many years. He is a thorough business man and has 
earned the trust and confidence of his entire com- 
munity. 

Mr. Routsong was born in Orange Township of 
Noble County September 13, 1874, a son of Benja- 
min and Julia (Routsong) Routzahn. His father 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, and his mother in 
Noble County, Indiana. Benjamin came to Noble 
County when a young man. bought a farm in Orange 
Township, and after selling it moved to Elkhart 
Township and acquired a place near Rome City. 
His last days were spent in Rome Citj', where his 
widow is still living. Both were active members of 
the German Lutheran Church. Benjamin Routzahn 
was a democrat and served as director of schools. 
Of his seven children the following brief record is 
given : Emory E., now retired from business and 
spending his summers in New Jersey and his win- 
ters in Florida; Sadie, wife of W. A. Hoke, of 
Hammond, Indiana; Ella, wife of Freemont Col- 
dren, of Canton, Ohio ; Clement G. ; Rose, wife of 
W. A. Myrick, of Newport, Arkansas; Tilla, wife of 
Ned Jennings, of Rome City; and Oscar, of Ham- 
mond, Indiana. 

Clement G. Routsong grew up at his father's 
home in Noble County and acquired a good prepara- 
tion for his business career. He attended the com- 
mon and high schools, and finished with a business 
course at Fort Wayne. While he has given closest 
attention to his_ business affairs Mr. Routsong has 
also been active in the democratic party. He received 
the nomination from his party for joint state sen- 
ator from LaGrange, Noble and Steuben counties, 
but that year the democratic ticket was defeated. 

Mr. Routsong married Lura De Owen, daughter 
of M. F.Owen, of Rome City, where she was edu- 
cated, being a graduate of the high school. They 
have two children, Pauline De, a graduate of high 
school and now attending Defiance College in Ohio ; 
and Maxine Jeannette, a high school girl. 

Mr. Routsong is affiliated with Ionic Lodge No. 
380, Free and Accepted Masons, is a past noble 
grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and his wife is a member of the Methodist Church. 

John H. Wilson. In Washington Township, 
Noble County, one tract of land and farm bears 
evidence of the labors and occupation of three 
generations of the Wilson family. John H. Wilson, 
of the third generation, is still living on a fine farm 
that was entered by his grandfather direct from 
the Government. The Wilson farm is six miles 
south of Cromwell. 

His grandfather was Thomas H. Wilson, who 
came into the county in pioneer times and acquired 
379 acres. He built a log cabin in the midst of the 
woods and for many years was busily engaged in 
making a home. All his efforts, however, were not 
confined to his farm, since he was one of the 
organizers and most active members of the Chris- 
tian Church. He and his wife had eight children, 
all of whom are now deceased. 

Thomas J. Wilson, father of John H., was also 
born on the Wilson farm in Washington Township. 
He grew up there, had a common school education, 
and spent his life as a practical farmer. He died 
in 1892. He was a democrat and served one term 
as township trustee. He married Nancy Rider, and 
both were very active members of the church. Mrs. 
Thomas J. Wilson is still living. She was the 
mother of three children, one of whom died in 
infancy. The two survivors are: John H. ; and 
Stella, wife of John P. Beaslev, and they still 
occupy a part of the old Wilson farm. 

John H. Wilson was born at his present home 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



in 1862 and has spent his entire life in that one 
locality. He owns 239 acres, and in addition to 
his extensive farming interests is a stockholder in 
the Sparta State Bank and in the Farmers State 
Bank at North Webster. He is a democrat, but 
has never taken much part in politics. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Church of God, 
and he is one of the deacons of the church at 
Wilmot. 

In October, 1885, Mr. Wilson married Barbara 
A. Huber. She was born in Washington Township 
March 29, 1865, daughter of Tira and Nancy E. 
(Black) Huber, the former a native of Virginia 
and the latter of Ohio. They were married in Ohio 
and were early settlers in Washington Township 
of Noble County. Mrs. Wilson's parents are both 
now deceased. They were loyal church members, 
and her father was a Mason, a democrat, and for 
many years held the office of justice of the peace. 
He and his wife had si.x children, two of whom 
died in infancy. The four still living are: Lewis 
C, of Ohio; Nancy E., wife of John W. Bouse; 
Barbara A., Mrs. Wilson; and Jennie A., wife of 
Bert Himes. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson had two chil- 
dren, one of whom died in infancy, and the other, 
Mary E., died at the age of fourteen. 

Richard Herrick is a native of Otsego Town- 
ship, is still living there, a prosperous and energetic 
farmer, and for nearly forty years has given the 
best of his energies and talents to his duties on 
the farm and in his community. 

He was born June 10, 1854, son of W. C. and 
Lucy (.A.very) Herrick. His father was born in 
Armenia Township of Dutchess County, New York, 
January i, 1812. and died on the farm now owned 
by his son Richard April 7, 1872. His wife was 
born in Cayuga County, New York, March 18, 
1813. W. C. Herrick was a son of James and Abi- 
gail (Castle) Herrick, who moved from Dutchess 
to Cayuga County, New York, where Abigail died. 
In 1833 James moved west to Sandusky County, 
Ohio, and spent the rest of his years there. W. C. 
Herrick came to Steuben County in 1840, settling 
in Otsego Township, on a tract of government land. 
Altogether he had 120 acres, and his individual 
labors cleared away the woods and made it produc- 
tive. His first home was a log house. He and his 
wife spent their last years there. She died in 
1882. He was a democrat in politics, but during 
Lincoln's time became converted to republicanism. 
His three children were Malinda, Rufus and Rich- 
ard. 

Richard Herrick lived at home with his parents 
to the age of twenty-four, and then went west 
and spent four years in different states and territo- 
ries. In 1881 he returned to Steuben County and 
located on his present farm, where he has done 
much to improve the condition of the land and 
erect new buildings. He and his wife together 
have 100 acres, devoted to general farming and 
stock raising. He is a raiser of Shorthorn cattle. 
Mr. Herrick has been quite active in republican 
politics, though never a candidate for office him- 
self. 

In December, 1881, he married Margaret Ann 
Willenner. She was born in Wood County, Ohio, 
in 1844, daughter of John and Mary (Crumb) 
Willenner. Her parents came to Otsego Township 
about 1863, and spent their last years here. Mr. 
and Mrs. Herrick have two children. Cordia is 
the wife of Earl Allwood, of Edgerton, Ohio, and 
she has three children, named Zeda, Bernice and 
Dorothy. Rufus Grant, who lives at Morley, Michi- 



gan, married Nettie Halverson, and they have three 
sons, named Richard M., Donaldson and Herbert. 

J.^MEs M. ScHLABACH is a member of a prominent 
and rather numerous family that has been identified 
with Noble County for over half a century. He has 
spent many years of his life as a practical and pro- 
gressive farmer, and is a stockman of good repute, 
well known as a horse buyer. His home is in Sparta 
Township, in section 33. 

Mr. Schlabach was born in Pennsylvania, April 
20, 1865, son of Henry and Mary A. (Young) Schla- 
bach, both natives of Pennsylvania. His parents 
came to Noble County, Indiana, in 1866, locating in 
Sparta Township. His father bought forty acres 
of land at first and later had a farm of seventy 
acres. He was for two years a Union soldier in the 
Civil war, but was always a democrat in politics, and 
he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Church in Kimmel. Henry Schlabach and wife had 
a large family of ten children, seven of whom are 
still living, namelj' : Emma, wife of Henry Sparrow; 
John, of Goshen, Indiana: Samuel, of Kimmel; 
Sarah, wife of Elmer Williams, of Fort Wayne; 
Ella, wife of Stephenson Schlantz, of Kimmell ; 
James M. ; and George, of Sparta Township. 

James M. Schlabach has lived in Noble County 
since early infancy, spent his early life on his father's 
farm and attended the district schools, and at the 
age of twenty started out to make his own living. 
For several years he worked on neighboring farms 
at monthly wages. January 23, 1886, he married 
Ida A. McFarren. She was born in Wabash County, 
Indiana, and had a public school education. Mr. and 
Mrs. Schlabach have had two children : Sylvia 
Schlabach, who was born October 28, 1886, died 
August 24, 1888, age twenty-two months. Walter E., 
born April I, 1895, married Minnie Saltz and had one 
daughter, Alecia, who was born in March, 1916, and 
died March 27, 1919. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schlabach are members of the 
Christian Church and in politics he is a republican. 
His home farm comprises fifty-four acres. 

Monroe Kemery, owner of one of the good farms 
of Salem Township, is a member of an old and well 
known famly of Steuben Township. They came 
to this part of Northeast Indiana more than sixty 
years ago and have been participants in business 
and public affairs as well as in agriculture. 

Monroe Kemery was born at Angola January 19, 
1869, a son of Absalom and Rowena (Robbins) 
Kemery, and grandson of Jacob Kemery. Jacob 
Kemery was a native of Pennsylvania and died in 
1838. His wife, Mary Loubert, was a native of 
Germany. Jacob and Mary had a family of six 
sons, two of whom died in infancy, one killed at the 
battle of Jonesboro in the Civil war, while all are 
now gone. One of them was Israel Kemery, long 
prominent in Angola as a landlord and also one of 
the county officials. He established the second har- 
ness shop at Angola in 1856. 

Absalom Kemery was born at Lancaster, Ohio, 
and in 1855, on moving to Steuben County, settled 
on a farm 3^ miles northeast of Angola in Pleas- 
ant Township. About i860 he left the farm and 
moved to Angola, and in 1861 enlisted in the Fourth 
Michigan Infantry. He was in service one year and 
was then discharged on account of disability. After 
the war he farmed until about 1872, and from that 
time until his death lived on a small place about 
a mile north of Angola. He died in January, 1919, 
and his wife in May, 1916. They were the parents of 
four children: Monroe, Carl, Lettie and Ernest D. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



97 



Absalom Kemery was affiliated with the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 

Monroe Kemery attended school at Angola and 
when a young man went to work in the sawmill 
of Croxton & Butz. He was with that firm for 
twelve years. Since then his activities have been 
directed to agriculture. In 1904 he bought forty 
acres of section 24, Salem Township, and in 1909 
sold that and bought eighty acres in section 23. 
He has improved his farm with good buildings, 
and is making steady progress toward independence 
and prosperity. He is affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias. 

In 1889 Mr. Kemery married Olive Huffman, 
daughter of Wilson and Maggie Huffman. They 
have two children, Odessa and Wilson. Odessa by 
her marriage to Arch Parker has two children, 
Monroe and Ulamda. Her second husband is Noah 
Angemyer. 

Emmet W. Black is a member of one of the best 
known families of Noble County, and his own 
efforts and enterprise have been chiefly directed 
along the lines of farming and today he is pro- 
prietor of what is known as the Old Home Farm, 
comprising 156 acres located three miles southwest 
of Albion in York Township. Besides the home 
farm he also has a tract of sixty-two acres in the 
same township. This gives him all the land that 
he can handle, and he has kept this farm producing 
maximum crops for a number of years. 

Mr. Black has spent most of his life in Noble 
County but was born in Stark County, Ohio, De- 
cember 14, 1862. His father, J. W. Black, was born 
in Stark County, Ohio. His mother, Matilda M. 
Tyler, was born in Michigan. They were married 
in Ohio and in 1866 came to Noble County and 
located five miles southwest of .Albion, on the land 
now owned by their son Emmet. J. W. Black was 
one of the diligent pioneers, a hard-working farmer, 
and spent many useful years on the farm where his 
son now lives. He was a republican and for six 
years served as assessor of York Township. In 
the family were eleven children, five of whom are 
now living: John W., of Canton, Ohio; Emmet 
W.; Charles, of Noble County: Calvin, of York 
Township : and Jennie, wife of David Young. 

Emmet W. Black grew up on the home farm 
and was educated in the district schools. After 
reaching his majority he bought ninety acres and 
farmed that for several years, finally selling it and 
buying the old home farm. 

April 19, i8q4, he married Miss Ella Blackman, 
daughter of Sylvester Blackman. Mrs. Black was 
reared on the old Blackman farm and is a graduate 
of the common schools. They have three daughters : 
Gladys, who has taken one year in high school, 
and Alma and Mary, both graduates of the common 
schools. The family are members of the Presby- 
terian Church and Mr. Black is a trustee. He is 
affiliated with the Masonic Lodge at Albion and 
in politics is a republican. Besides his extensive 
farming interests he is a stockholder in the .Albion 
Grist Mill. 

Virgil S. Goodsell. There is no difficulty in 
identifying Virgil S. Goodsell as a resident of Mil- 
ford Township, LaGrange County. He has been 
a public official, a live business man, a farmer, and 
altogether associated with the best interests of the 
community for many years. He is one of the 
proprietors of the Cannon & Goodsell Lumber Com- 
pany at South Milford, and has recently closed 
a splendid term as township trustee. 

He was born in Milford Township October 18, 

Vol. II— 7 



1872, a son of William M. and Catherine (Stoehr) 
Goodsell. His father was born in Milford Town- 
ship in December, 1840, and his mother was also a 
native of LaGrange County. Both are still living 
in Milford Township. The father is a democrat 
in politics. There were six children in the family, 
four of whom are still living: Augusta, wife of 
Frank Cochran; Treat M., deceased; Virgil S. ; 
Nellie G., wife of A. E. Fraas ; one that died in 
infancy; and Clara, wife of O. P. Newnam, of 
Milford Township. 

Virgil S. Goodsell grew up on his father's farm, 
is a graduate of the district schools, and so far has 
been content with the status of a bachelor. He 
operates the old homestead, known as the Wigwam 
Farm, comprising 140 acres, situated five miles 
north and one mile east of South Milford. This 
farm is well known for its livestock, especially its 
thoroughbred Red Polled cattle. The Goodsells 
have produced some of the finest animals of this 
class, and their private sales are largely attended. 

Mr. Goodsell is affiliated with South Milford 
Lodge No. 619, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is also a member of the Encampment. Politi- 
cally he is a democrat. He is a former secretary 
of the Mercantile Association of Mount Pisgalia, 
the oldest association of its kind in the United 
States. This is a co-operative farmers' club or 
association and handles a general stock of mer- 
chandise. Mr. Goodsell was elected trustee of Mil- 
ford Township in November, 1914, and closed up his 
term of office January i, 191 9. Many commenda- 
tions have been paid his record as trustee, and all 
of them have been deserved. The accountants ap- 
proved his books without a flaw, and he was espe- 
cially successful in keeping up the schools of the 
township to a high standard and paid higher wages 
than many other townships in this part of the 
state. 

Alva Hite. For over fifty years Alva Hite has 
been numbered among the best and most useful 
citizens of Perry Township in Noble County. With 
the exception of four years he has lived all his life 
on one farm, which is located five and a half miles 
northwest of Ligonier. 

He was born there January 13, 1867, son of 
Thomas W. and Harriet (Teaford) Hite. His 
father was born in Jay County, Indiana, March 31, 
1839. He was a soldier in the Civil war, serving 
nine months. Both families moved to Noble County 
in early days, and Thomas and Harriet were married 
there and then located on the land now contained 
in farm of their son Alva. Thomas Hite was a man 
of much enterprise, good business judgment, and 
acquired 214 acres. He also earned a great wealth 
of community esteem, was an active republican, and 
a liberal supporter of the church. He and his wife 
had ten children, nine of whom are still living: 
Nelson, of Perry Township; Alva; Clara B., wife 
of P'rank Baker, of Detroit; Laura M., wife of Har- 
vey Hartzler; Luella, wife of Robert Cooper, of 
Albion; Bessie, wife of Harry Pincheon, of Al- 
bion; Nona, wife of John Baker, of Ligonier; J. 
C, of Ligonier; and Homer, a farmer in Perry 
Township. 

Alva Hite attended the district schools during his 
youth and learned all the principles of good farming 
during the lifetime of his father. At the age of 
twenty-four he married Cora Crockett. She died 
in July, 1897, mother of one child, Faye, who was 
born March 28, 1897, and is now a clerk in the 
Stansberry store at Ligonier. Mr. Hite married 
for his second wife Inez A. Milner. They have five 
children : Anna, attending high school. Dean, Dora, 



98 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Thomas and Robert, all of whom are living except 
Robert. The family are members of the United 
Brethren Church. Mr. Hite is a republican in poli- 
tics. While he had as a start toward an independent 
career a capital of about two thousand dollars, he 
has earned and made all the rest of his prosperity. 
He owns the old homestead of 134 acres and also 
thirty-nine acres in LaGrange County. He is a 
stockholder in the Ligonier Elevator Company and 
was a member of the Township Advisory Board 
when the township graded school was built. 

Jasper B. Gerkin is a representative of one of 
the old and substantial families of Washmgton 
Township in Noble County, and has spent practically 
all his life there. He owns a good farm and is a 
man of most substantial citizenship. His home is in 
section 4 of Washington Township, five miles 
southeast of Cromwell. 

He was born in Sparta Township of the same 
county in November, 1853, a son of Harmon and 
Mary (Beamblossom) Gerkin. His father was a 
native of Germany and came to the United States 
when a young man, locating in Ohio, where he 
married, his wife being a native of that state. They 
then came to Noble County and spent the rest of 
their days in Sparta Township, living in different 
localities there. Harmon Gerkin was an active mem- 
ber of the Broadway Christian Church. After the 
death of his first wife he married again and had 
five children by that union. By his first marriage 
there were four children, and the three still living 
are; Sarah, wife of George Gunder, of Albion, 
Indiana; William, of Texas; and Jasper B. 

Jasper B. Gerkin grew up on the home farm in 
Sparta Township, attended district school there, 
and since early manhood, a period of nearly fifty 
years, he has been closely identified with the farm- 
ing interests of that county. He is a general farmer 
and stock raiser, still giving active management to 
his farm of ninety acres. 

Mr. Gerkin married Cecelia Knappe. She is a 
member of the old and prominent Knappe family of 
Washington Township and was born in Branchville, 
New Jersey, April 4, 1848, coming to Noble County 
with her parents in the spring of 1850. Mrs. Gerkin 
was well educated, and like her brothers taught 
school in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Gerkin had 
only one child, who died in infancy. They are 
prominent members of the Christian Church, and 
Mr Gerkin is one of the trustees and his wife clerk 
of the church. He is a republican and is affiliated 
with Cromwell Lodge No. 408, Knights of Pythias. 

Charles Hagerty is the business partner and as- 
sociate of his brother Emmet B. Hagerty in the 
mercantile firm of Hagerty Brothers at Scott. Both 
brothers are veteran merchants, and Charles Hagerty 
in early life had much practical experience as a 

He was born at Scott in Van Buren Township 
June 28, 1858, a son of James and Amanda (Bond) 
Hagerty. He attended public school at Scott and 
in early manhood began farming in his native town- 
ship, 'in 1887 he bought the interest of Charles 
Munger, then associated with his brother Emmet, 
and has since been an active partner in the firm of 
Hagerty Brothers. 

Mr. Hagerty married Clara L. Moak on January 
II, 1881. She is a daughter of Peter and Lovica 
(Satchel) Moak. Mr. and Mrs. Hagerty have a 
family of five children: Ethel, wife of Henry 
Ringler and mother of Oriel ; Loa L., who was mar- 
ried to Fred Walton, and they have a daughter, 
Frances; Harold, who married Elizabeth Eash; 



Dewey; and Wreta. Harold enlisted December 11, 

1917, in Company Eighteen, Second Regiment, Air 
Service Mechanics, and left for overseas March 4, 

1918. He saw service in France fourteen months, 
being discharged June 11, 1919. He was married 
after coming back from the war. 

Ferm Bowman. Of one of the most important 
institutions in the county, the^ Noble County In- 
firmary, Ferm Bowman is by virtue of appointment 
from tlie Board of County Commissioners superin- 
tendent. He is a young man of many qualifications 
for the office and his administration has already 
been productive of many of the results which his 
friends predicted. 

Mr. Bowman was born in York Township of 
Noble County September 28, 1879, son of Ream and 
Alvira (Saltzgaber) Bowman. His father is still 
living in Fort Wayne. Mr. Bowman was only eight 
months old when his mother died, and he grew up 
at the home of his maternal grandfather in York 
Township. He had an education in the common 
schools and at the age of fourteen he left home 
and since then has been making his own way in the 
world, dependent entirely upon his own efforts. 

In January, 1913, he married Nora Jones, of 
Wayne Township, daughter of Edward Jones of 
Rome City. They have three children : Bulah, 
Karl and Merton. Mr. Bowman is a republican in 
politics and was appointed superintendent of the 
County Infirmary on January i, 1918. He took up 
his duties March 1st of the same year, and holds 
the office for a period of four years. For a num- 
ber of years before entering upon his present duties 
he farmed in Allen Township. 

Minor S. Perkins is one of four brothers who 
are well known in the business, agricultural and 
civic life of LaGrange County. Minor S. has a 
well improved and valuable farm a mile west of 
Stroh. 

He was born in Milford Township August 14, 
1874, a son of Samuel and Emma (Mains) Per- 
kins. Some of the interesting particulars in this 
old and well known family are found on other 
pages. Minor Perkins grew up on the home farm, 
located a mile south of where he now lives, at- 
tended the district schools, and in 1903 married Etta 
Ringler. She was born in DeKalb County, In- 
diana, and was educated in the common schools. 
Since his marriage Mr. Perkins has lived on his 
present farm and has cultivated and improved it so 
as to win a livelihood and constantly increase its 
value. In 191 1 he built a modern home, one of 
the best in the township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have two children: Bertha, 
born in 1905, and Floyd, born in 1907. Mr. Perkins 
is affiliated with Philo Lodge of Masons and is a 
republican in politics. 

Like his brothers he has been prospered in busi- 
ness affairs. He is a member of the firm Perkins 
Brothers, owners of the Stroh Grain Company at 
Stroh. Individually he owns a half section of land 
and is one of the directors of the Farmers State 
Bank at Stroh. 

John M. Weimer, whose farm home is two miles 
north and one mile east of Avilla in Noble County, 
is an example of those straight thinking, upright 
and hard working Americans who begin life with no 
special advantages, without capital, and who by an 
unlimited expenditure of labor, thrift and intelli- 
gence win good homes and independence. 

Mr. Weimer was born in Allen Township of Noble 
County, July 29, 1857, and has lived in that locality 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIAXA 



practically sixty years. His parents were Adam 
and May (Hess) Weimer, both natives of Germany. 
They came with their respective families to the 
United States on the same vessel in 1848. Adam 
Weimer located at Toledo, where he worked at his 
trade, was also employed in the same line at Fort 
Wayne, and afterward married in Noble County, 
Indiana, and located on a farm near Avilla, where 
he spent his last years. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and he was a democrat. 
Of eight children si.x are still living: John M., 
Adam, Charles J. and Henry P., all farmers in 
Allen Township, Elizabeth, unmarried, and Paul, 
also in Allen Township. 

John M. Weimer grew up on the home farm, at- 
tended the common schools, and as a youth started 
to learn the trade of carpenter. He acquired much 
skill in that line, and worked not only as a journey- 
man but also took individual contracts and followed 
the business for about thirty years. During that 
time he built a large number of barns and other 
structures throughout Noble County. From the age 
of eighteen until he reached his majority Mr. 
Weimer gave all his wages to his parents, and then 
started out even with the world to win his own 
fortune. He has had the cooperation of his good 
wife through all the years, and they have secured 
and developed a valuable farm of eighty acres, rep- 
resenting to them a good home and also an invest- 
ment for their future j'ears. Mr. Weimer has the 
farm well stocked. 

January I, 1887, he married Miss Susanna Diehm. 
She was born in Allen Township of Noble County 
and was educated in the common schools. One son 
was born to their marriage, Carl G., born March lO, 
1890. He was educated in the common schools and 
for five years was a mail clerk in the United States 
Railway postoffice, having a run on the Wabash 
Railroad. He left that service to enter the army 
and remained with the colors until recently, now 
being at home. Mr. and Mrs. Weimer are members 
of the Lutheran Church and in politics he is a 
democrat. 

Thomas Curtis is one of the men who are carry- 
ing some of the active burdens of farming and 
animal husbandry in Lima Township of LaGrange 
County, and he has been a factor in that com- 
munity for nearly twenty years. 

Mr. Curtis was born at London, England, De- 
cember 19, 1871, and was only a few weeks old 
when his parents, Henry and Elizabeth Curtis, 
located in LaGrange County in February, 1872. He 
grew up at Howe, attended the grammar schools 
there and also the high school, and from early 
manhood has been identified with farming as his 
vocation. He bought his present farm in Lima 
Township, consisting of ninety-six acres, in 1906. It 
was well improved land but he has remodeled the 
house and barn and added a silo, and is doing a 
prosperous business as a general farmer and stock- 
raiser. Mr. Curtis is a republican and a member of 
the Episcopal Church. 

In 1897 he married Miss Ada Abey, of Van Buren 
Township, daughter of Jacob Abey. She was reared 
in the home of her grandfather, Jacob Abey. Mr. 
Curtis died in 1910, at the age of thirty-three. She 
left one son, Leland H. J., born in October, 1898. 
He was educated in the public schools and high 
school at Howe, and is still at home with his 
father. 

RuFus C. Fuller is a native of Noble County, 
has had a busy and useful life as a farmer, and 
today owns one of the good farms of Washington 



Township, located in section I, three miles west of 
Wolf Lake. 

He was born in York Township October 15, 1861, 
son of Cornelius and Mary (Grimes) Fuller, both 
natives of Ohio. After their marriage they located 
in York Township of Noble County and spent the 
rest of their days in that county. Cornelius Fuller 
was a carpenter and contractor, and built many 
houses and other structures that still stand to attest 
his skill. His wife was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Their children were named 
Melissa, Jacob, Samantha, Amanda and Rufus. 

Rufus C. Fuller lived in York Township until he 
was six years old, when his parents removed to 
Noble Township, and since coming of age he has 
given his years to the pursuit of agriculture. His 
present farm comprises uo acres, and it is well 
equipped and well stocked aud represents a com- 
fortable competence. 

Mr. Fuller married May Richmond, who was 
born at Wolf Lake November 23, 1866, daughter 
of William and Letecia A. (Bethel) Richmond 
Her parents were born in Ohio, were married at 
Wolf Lake, and her father was well known as a 
teacher, carpenter, contractor and farmer. Mrs. 
Fuller was reared on a farm, and attended school 
in Wolf Lake, Ligonier and Spring Hill. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fuller had five children: Bird, now deceased; 
Gertrude, wife of Roy Salmon; Letecia, wife of 
Don Braden; Ralph, a farmer; and Schuyler. Mr. 
Fuller is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Kimmell and in politics is a re- 
publican. 

Sherman Morris. One of the oldest and most val- 
iied farm homes in Sparta Township is that of 
Sherman Morris, comprising 240 acres of rich and 
well cultivated soil which has been in the owner- 
ship of the Morris family since pioneer days. Sher- 
man Morns was born on this farm July 15, 1868, has 
lived there all his life and has been a man of public 
affairs as well as a capable farmer. 

His father, Andrew Morris, was born in Preble 
County, Ohio, November 6, 1828, and when ten 
years old in 1838, the family moved to Kosciusko 
Lounty, Indiana, and entered government land in 
Turkey Creek Township. The grandfather spent 
the rest of his days there. Andrew Morris mar- 
ried at Pleasantville, Indiana, March 17, 1859, La- 
vina Morrow, whose family were among the first 
pioneers of Noble County. She was born in Perry 
Township of that county in 1836, and died Jan- 
uary 20, 1917. ."indrew Morris and wife after 
their marriage settled in Sparta Township and 
spent the rest of their days there. His wife was 
a member of the Universalist Church, and he was 
a liberal supporter of that cause. He was very 
active and prominent as a republican and for three 
years was a member of the County Board of Com- 
missioners and also assessor of Sparta Township 
There were four children in the familv: John C, 
of Sparta Township; Jennie, wife of j. F Eagles' 
Sherman; and Manford, of Turkey Creek Town- 
ship. 

Sherman Morris received a common school edu- 
cation, and for thirty years applied himself to the 
practical business of farming the old homestead. 
He IS also a stockholder in the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Trust Company at Ligonier. 

On November 10, i8q8, he married Rena Buchtel, 
who was born in Perry Township of Noble County, 
January 27, 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Morris have no 
children of their own but are rearing a daughter, 
Pauline Knapp, who was born March 29, 1905, and 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



IS now attending the public schools. Mr. Morris 
is afliliated with Cromwell Lodge No. 729, Free 
and Accepted Masons, is past chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge and has been a member 
of the Grand Lodge. In politics he is a republican. 
During his four years' term as trustee of Sparta 
Township he made a creditable record, and handled 
all the affairs entrusted to him, particularly the 
schools, in a way to satisfy the wishes and desires 
of a great majority of the people of the township. 

William Pieper has for many years been one of 
the most industrious and capable farmer citizens of 
Noble County. His life has been productive in many 
ways, and among men in whom the people have con- 
fidence and who carry into private and public life 
every mark of esteem perhaps no one is better 
known than Mr. Pieper, who has been successful 
as a farmer and has held many of the offices of trust 
in his county. 

He was born in Westphalia, Germany, November 
IS, 1847, son of Casper and Elizabeth (Simon) 
Pieper. His mother died in Germany, and his father 
spent his last years in the United States. William 
Pieper grew up in his native land and lived there 
to the age of twenty. His education was the result 
of attending the common schools to the age of six- 
teen. After that he spent four years selling hard- 
ware on the road during the winter seasons and 
helping his father on the farm in summer. He pur- 
sued this business so energetically that he was able 
to accumulate about $1,000. 

With this capital, which made him a rather 
wealthy immigrant, he started on August 5, 1868, 
for his future home in the United States. He was 
nineteen days on the ocean and landed at Baltimore 
October 5, 1868, and soon afterward arrived in Ken- 
dallville and from there went to Avilla, in which 
locality he has lived now for half a century. The 
first three months he was employed as a farm la- 
borer, and then bought eighty acres three miles 
northeast of Avilla. There he built his first home 
in the county, and two years later he married Miss 
Rosa Vogeding. She was born at Dayton, Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pieper lived on their farm near Avilla 
for forty-four years, and then moved to his present 
place, where he has 160 acres in Allen Township 
and also owns a business house in Avilla. 

Mrs. Pieper died September 7, 1917, after thirty- 
five years of married companionship. Five of her 
children are still living: Henry E., who graduated 
from Valparaiso College, taught in Noble County 
and for seven years was a teacher in the Philip- 
pines, and is now a teacher of Spanish at Valparaiso ; 
Frank J., who is a hay inspector with the United 
States government at Toledo, Ohio ; William, now 
living at Washburn, Wisconsin ; Charles J., a grad- 
uate of high school and of Wabash College, was for 
four years a teacher in the University School at 
Chicago Heights and is now a chemist in Govern- 
ment service at Washington ; and Lillie, a graduate 
of the Kendallville High School and keeping up the 
home for her father. Mr. and Mrs. Pieper also took 
into their household an adopted child, Hilda Heck- 
man. 

Mr. Pieper and family are members of the Cath- 
olic Church at Avilla. He is a democrat in politics. 
In 1884 he was elected trustee of Allen Township, 
and gave a competent direction to his official affairs 
for six years. He was elected a member of the 
County Council and served four years. For nine 
years, three successive terms, he was a county com- 
missioner of the Middle District of Noble County. 

Amos C. Schrock is trustee of Van Buren Town- 
ship in LaGrange County, and the good work he 



is doing in that office is what was anticipated by 
his fellow citizens, who have long known him as a 
practical farmer and business man identified with 
every movement in the community for advancement 
and progress. 

Mr. Schrock lives today on a farm where he 
was born December 12, 1873. He is a son of Cor- 
nelius Schrock, who was born in Holmes County, 
Ohio, in 1830, and a grandson of Peter and Fannie 
(Plank) Schrock, both natives of Ohio. Peter 
Schrock settled in Elkhart County, Indiana, in 1842, 
and lived there the rest of his life. His children 
were John, Abraham, Rachel, Mary, Peter, David, 
Joseph and Cornelius. Cornelius Schrock married 
Magdalena Bontrager, who was born in Somerset 
County, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1832, a daughter of 
John and Martha Bontrager. In 1871 Cornelius 
Schrock bought the farm in Van Buren Township 
now owned by his son, and was busy with its care 
and superintendence the rest of his life. He owned 
eighty acres. His death occurred January 27, 1913. 
He and his wife had a large family of children, 
named Peter, Cyrus, Joseph, Anna, Daniel, Isaac, 
John, who died at the age of sixteen, Henry, Eli, 
who died when two years old, Christ, David, who 
died at the age of two years, Amos and Andrew, 
who died in childhood. 

Amos Schrock acquired a district school education 
in Van Buren Township and when sixteen left home 
and began earning his living as a monthly laborer. 
He followed this line of employment until he was 
twenty-three years of age. In 1893 Mr. Schrock 
left Indiana, spent one year in Nebraska, and after 
that lived in Kansas until 1900. He then returned to 
Van Buren Township and in 1902 bought the home- 
stead of eighty acres in section 33. He also owns 
thirty-one acres in Newbury Township. 

Mr. Schrock married Laura Marhofer April 4, 
1898. She is a daughter of Valentine Marhofer, of 
Greenwood County, Kansas. To their marriage have 
been born three children : Marion V., a student in 
the Indiana State University; Jesse E., and Glendon 
L. Mr. Schrock was elected and began his duties 
as township trustee in January, 1919. During the 
four preceding years from January, 1915, he held 
the office of township assessor. 

Alvin R. Roush. This is a family name that has 
been identified with the good citizenship and agri- 
cultural activities of Washington Township in Noble 
County for a great many years. Alvin R. Roush is 
one of the younger members of the family and has 
had a successful career as a general farmer and 
stock raiser. 

His farm of eighty acres is in section 19, and is 
the same farm where he was born in August, 1882. 
His parents were Alfred and Elizabeth (Rider) 
Roush. His father was a native of Ohio. His 
mother was born in October, 1849, on the same farm 
where she now lives with her children. Her father, 
Jacob Rider, was a pioneer in this section of In- 
diana, entered government land, and was long 
known for his upright and honest character. He 
had learned the miller's trade in Pennsylvania, be- 
ginning when he was sixteen years old and after 
he came to Indiana he built and for many years 
operated what was known as Rider's Mills. He was 
a democrat in politics. Jacob Rider lived to the 
age of ninety-four. Of his seven children only two 
are now living: Mrs. James Wilson and Mrs. 
Alfred Roush. Alfred Roush during the high tide 
of his activity as a farmer conducted and operated 
250 acres of land. He was an active member of the 
Lutheran Church. He and his wife had nine chil- 
dren, and the four now living are : Harry, who is 
unmarried and lives with his mother; Alvin R. ; 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



101 



Nettie, a high school graduate and a former teacher, 
now the wife of. A. D. Wilkinson of Whitley 
County, Indiana ; and R. W., a resident of JJorth 
Wehster, Indiana. 

Alvin R. Roush spent his entire life on the old 
farm. He was well educated, first in the district 
schools, later in high school for one year, and he 
also attended college at Hillsdale, Michigan, and 
at Angola. Indiana. On May 0, iqo3, he married 
Orra Seymour, who was born in Noble Township 
and County June 7, 1881, and is a graduate of the 
Wolf Lake High School, after which she taught for 
five years, until her marriage. She is a daughter 
of George and Lydia (Howenstine) Seymour, of 
Wolf Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Roush have lived on 
their present farm since their marriage and have 
been steadily prospered, and already have sur- 
rounded themselves with all the circumstances of 
prosperous people, including a family of four bright 
young children. These children are : Francis, born 
October 19, IQ04, now a student in high school; 
Alfreda, born in September, 1007; Thomas, born in 
January, 1909; and Georgie E., born in December, 
1910. Mr. Roush is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge at Cromwell and is a democrat. 

Keep Lemmon. Several pages of this publication 
are given over to tracing the conspicuous facts in 
the record of the Lemmon family in Steuben 
County. In all their varied relations and long resi- 
dence here they have proved themselves stalwart 
and worthy citizens, good farmers, good neigh- 
bors, and people of the utmost worth and value. 
They are one of the oldest families, and many of 
them have intermarried with other old families. 

One of the younger generation is Keep Lemmon, 
a prominent farmer of Otsego Township. He was 
born in that township. May 19, 1869, a son of Brace 
and Dill (Grain) Lemmon and a grandson of Mor- 
ris and Lucinda (Rathburn) Lemmon, who were 
the founders of the family in Northeast Indiana. 
Brace Lemmon was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, 
in i8_|.:;, had a common school education and after 
his marriage, which was celebrated in DeKalb 
County, settled on a farm now owned by Earl Lem- 
mon. He cleared up much of that land and re- 
peated that process with two other tracts of land. 
About 1889 he moved to the place now owned by 
his son Keep Lemmon. and lived there until his 
death in January, 1918. His first wife died in 
1875, leaving two children, Lucinda and Keep. 
Brace Lemmon married for his second wife Diana 
Quick. They had four children : Lee, wife of 
Lewis Wallberry. a son of George H. Wallberry, 
the old soldier and well known citizen of Otsego 
Township; Bell, wife of Joseph Sewell ; Phena, 
wife of Lafayette Wells; and Edna, wife of Glenn 
Greenwood. Grace Lemmon was a republican and 
a member of the Methodist Church. 

Keep Lemmon grew up on the farm of his father 
in Otsego Township, acquired a good education 
in the district schools, and during his life has ac- 
tively prosecuted his business as a farmer. He 
owns 179 acres, including the ninety-two acres last 
owned by his father. He gives his attention to 
general farming and stock raising. He is, like his 
father, a republican and a member of the Grange. 

September 19, 189.3, he married Miss Clarissa Fee, 
a daughter of Calvin Fee and a granddaughter of 
John Fee, who is recorded in history as the first 
settler of Otsego Township. Mr. and Mrs. Lem- 
mon have two daughters, Myrtie and Marie. Myrtie 
is the wife of Basil Oberlin, a son of James Ober- 
lin of Steuben County. Marie is the wife of Ford 



Keppler, of Otsego Township. Both daughters are 
graduates of the high school at Hamilton, attended 
the Tri-State Normal College at Angola, and prior 
to their marriage were teachers. 

John Ott is a native son of Noble County, a man 
who has distinguished himself by enterprise and 
thrift and good judgment in all his relations with 
his community, and is one of the leading farmers of 
Noble Township. His home is in section 13. 

He was born in Green Township of that county, 
March 31, 1852, son of Jesse and Docia (Brown) 
Ott. His parents were both natives of Preble 
County, Ohio, his father born December I, 1822, 
and his mother in January, 1830. They were reared 
in Preble County, and after their marriage moved 
to Indiana in 1850, settling in the southern part of 
Green Township, where after clearing and improv- 
ing their land they lived until their death. They 
were active members of the Christian Church, Jesse 
Ott serving as a trustee, and was a republican in 
politics. They were the parents of eight children : 
Cornelius; Amanda, wife of William Cucas ; John; 
George, who is deceased ; Fred ; Abraham ; Eli ; and 
Alpha. 

John Ott grew up on his father's farm in Green 
Township, and had only the advantages of the 
common schools, but has wisely improved his op- 
portunities and is a man of wide inclination as well 
as much practical ability. For four years he worked 
out by the month, later rented, and since his mar- 
riage has acquired his present farm of seventy-four 
acres. Besides farming he follows the carpenter 
trade. 

In November, 1879, Mr. Ott married Martha Man- 
ning. She was born in Allen County, Indiana, and 
received a common school education. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ott have a fine family of eight children, fourteen 
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Their 
children are: Emmaretta, wife of William H. 
Huntsman; Mary, wife of George Edwards; Jesse, 
a farmer in Noble Township ; Orvin, of Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Nevada, wife of Leo Gaff; Clinton, of 
Noble County; Clara, wife of Archie Friskney ; and 
William, still at home. The parents are members of 
the Baptist Church and Mr. Ott is a republican. 

Oliver F. Schutt. A substantial farmer of Clay 
Township, LaGrange County, is found in Oliver F. 
.Schutt, who owns a well improved farm of eighty 
acres, which he devotes to grain and general 
produce and to the raising of standard stock. He 
was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, March 20, 
1863, and is a son of Christian and Mary (Seybert) 
Schutt. 

The parents of Mr. Schutt lived at Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, before coming to Warsaw, Kosciusko County, 
Indiana. The father died in this county in 1871, when 
aged forty-nine years. His children were as fol- 
lows : Julia, Maria, Susan, Hannah, Martha, Henry, 
Aaron, Maggie, John and Oliver F. The mother 
was first married to Mr. Shue, who died during the 
war. One son, Jacob, was born to that union. The 
mother died in 1879. 

Oliver F. Schutt was nine years old when he 
came to live in LaGrange County with his sister 
Susan, who was the wife of Davis Wolfe, a farmer 
in Van Buren Township, on the bank of Buck Lake. 
He was well taken care of, was sent to school and 
was taught to be a practical farmer. Later he 
bought his first farm, a tract of fifty-eight acres in 
Clay Township, but he soon sold that property and 
bought eighty acres six miles from LaGrange. in 
Newbury Township, and this he also sold and in 
1912 came to his present farm of eighty acres in 



102 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Clav Township. Mr. Schutt may feel that he has 
done well, considering that he has had his own 
wa5- to make in the world ever since boyhood. 

In 1885 Mr. Schutt was married to Miss Emma 
Newman, a daughter of Rozaine H. and Almeda 
Catherine (Laughlin) Newman. Formerly they 
were farming people in Van Buren Township but 
now live comfortably retired at LaGrange. Mrs. 
Schutt has one brother, Burr. Mr. and Mrs. Schutt 
have two children: Floyd, who was born July 
24, 1886, is a farmer east of White Pigeon, Mich- 
igan, married Bessie Bollinger, and they have a 
daughter, Myrtle; and Verne, born May 10, 1888, 
who is a farmer in Bloomfield Township, married 
Nora Miller, and they have two children, Pauline 
and Virgil. The family belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Schutt is a re- 
publican. 

Sylvester Bl.\ckm.\n is one of the oldest native 
sons still living in Noble County, and has spent 
more than three-quarters of a century there, during 
which time he has witnessed the upholding of nearly 
every condition which has important bearing upon 
the material prosperity and civilization of the 
present generation. Mr. Blackman was a veteran 
of the Civil war, and for half a century or more 
has been a practical farmer. He still lives on his 
fine farm in section 20 of York Township. 

He was born in that township, October 6, 1842, 
the son of Elisha and .\my (Rollins) Blackman. 
Elisha Blackman was born in Luzerne County, 
Pennsylvania, August i, 1801. He went to Ohio in 
early life and at Troy in Miami Coujity of that 
state married Amy Rollins on October 23, 1824. 
She was born in Miami County, Ohio, September 
2, 1808. Elisha Blackman and wife were among 
the earliest settlers of Noble County, locating in 
the year 18.36 at Roudy Ridge, where he entered 
a tract of land comprising eighty acres. He was 
a blacksmith by trade, and set up a shop in the 
woods and did more mechanical work than he did 
farming. After several years he sold his first place 
and bought eighty acres near where his son Syl- 
vester now lives. There he divided his time between 
his blacksmith shop and his fields. In religious 
faith he was a Swedcnborgian, and in politics was 
formerly a whig and later a republican. He died 
February 29, 1872, and his wife died May 16, i860. 
They were the parents of thirteen children. 

Sylvester Blackman grew up in a pioneer com- 
munity and attended school in a log schoolhouse. 
Altogether he received only a few months of school- 
ing. A few weeks after his twenty-first birthday, 
on December 23, 1863, he enlisted in Company B 
of tl>e Twelfth Indiana Infantry, and fought in 
active service from that time until the close of the 
war. He was with Sherman on his march to the 
sea and was honorably discharged from the service 
at Louisville. Kentucky, July 15, 1865. He returned 
home and during all the years since then has been 
busily engaged in farming. 

On October 29, 1867, he married Mary Jane Burns, 
who died forty-five years later, on April 4, 1913. 
Mr. and Mrs. Blackman are the parents of seven 
children. All are living except Frank, who died 
March 10, 1004. He was a graduate of the Ligonier 
High School. Ella, the oldest, is the wife of Emmet 
Black of York Township; Joseph E. married Lillian 
Dennison and William married Olive Smith. Ger- 
trude, Thaddeus and Anna are all unmarried. 
Thaddeus is a graduate of the University of Chi- 
cago, with a degree Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Mr. Blackman is a member of the Sparta Chris- 
tian Church, and served twelve years as a trustee 
of the Eel River Christian Conference. He was 



made a Mason January 4, 1864, at Albion, Indiana. 
He is also a member of the Royal Arch Chapter 
and Council at Ligonier, and is a Knight of Pythias. 
In politics he is a sterling republican. Mr. Black- 
man is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants 
Trust Company at Ligonier. He lives on his fine 
farm of 277 acres and enjoys the comforts of a 
fine modern home. 

Manassas M. Borntrager is one of the well 
known residents of LaGrange County, and occupies 
a fine farm which he bought and paid for out of 
his earnings as a practical agriculturist, and which 
is situated three miles west and four miles north of 
Topeka. 

He was born in section 4 of Eden Township, No- 
vember 24, 1879, a son of Manassas J. and Lydia 
(Voder) Borntrager. This is an old and well 
known family of LaGrange County, and his pa- 
ternal ancestors make a long line of Americans 
who have been in this country for more than a 
century and a half. 

Mr. Borntrager grew up on his father's farm, 
attended district school to the age of seventeen, 
and then worked at home until reaching his major- 
ity. On January 19, 1905, he married Elizabeth 
Miller, who was born in Clear Spring Township, 
April 23, 1887, a daughter of Emanuel and Anna 
(Slabaugh) Miller. Mrs. Borntrager grew up on 
her father's farm in Clear Spring Township and 
attended the common schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Borntrager 
lived for one year on her father's farm, then bought 
eighty acres in Clear Spring Township, but after 
four years sold that place, rented one summer and 
in 1912 bought the 120 acres comprising their pres- 
ent well managed and valuable farm, which is de- 
voted to general crops and livestock. 

Mr. and Mrs. Borntrager have seven children, 
named Emanuel, Urias, Sylvia, Anna, Amos, Noah 
and Manassas. The family are members of the 
Amish Mennonite Church. 

George M. Brown. There is a dignity connected 
with work well done, and a satisfaction that comes 
of industry and thrift in living. The man who 
early realizes that whatever is worth attempting is 
worth executing to the best of his ability is the man 
who wins out in life's contest. The measure of a 
man's ability is found in the esteem in which he is 
held by his associates. Those who meet him in the 
everyday vocations know just what he can and will 
do, and how he handles the problems presented to 
them all. Some fall far below the average, but 
there are others who set the pace, and in no line 
of endeavor is this truer than in farming. In 
reviewing the work of Steuben County agricultural- 
ists the biographer is struck by the fact that certain 
ones are deserving of special mention, and it may 
be truthfully said that if ever there was a leader in 
a farming community in whom the people for a wide 
radius placed implicit trust it is George M. Brown 
of Otsego Township, who is now serving his county 
as commissioner. 

George M. Brown was born in Cattaraugus 
Count3% New York, November 24, 1863, a son of 
Moseley and Eliza (Abbot) Brown. Moseley Brown 
was born in Cattaraugus County, New York, and 
died at Angola, Indiana, in January, 1873, while 
his wife, who was born in the same county as her 
husband, died in 1868. In 1869 Moseley Brown 
moved to Michigan, but after a year in that state 
came to Angola, where he worked as a teamster 
until his death. He and his wife had the follovifing 
children : Mary, who married George Sage ; Martha, 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



wlio married Henry Kaiikamp ; Colla, who married 
Cieorge Elliot ; George AI., whose name heads this 
review ; and Leland, who was the youngest. 

After the death of his father George M. Brown 
went to live with his uncle at Ray, Steuben County, 
remaining with him until he was eighteen years old, 
and during that period attended the district school. 
He then became a student of the Fremont High 
School, and still later of the Tri-State College at 
Angola, earning the money for the latter courses 
by selling books through Ohio and Virginia during 
the winter of 1881-2. Having thus prepared him- 
self, Mr. Brown began teaching school, his first 
appointment being to the Farnham School in Fre- 
mont Township. Steuben County, where he remained 
two years, and then for an equal length of time he 
taught in Otsego Township. 

In 1888 Mr. Brown entered upon the line of work 
for which he was so pre-eminently fitted, commenc- 
ing his operations on a hundred-acre tract bought 
for Mr. and Mrs. Brown by Mrs. Brown's father. 
From the start he succeeded, and he has kept on 
adding to his farm until he now owns 400 acres 
of as fine land as there is in the township, and on 
it he carries on general farming and stock raising. 
In addition to his farming Mr. Brown is at present 
manager of the Co-operative Shipping Association 
of Hamilton, Indiana, and he has handled con- 
siderable livestock during the past ten years. In 
1008 Mr. Brown's fellow citizens elected him trustee 
of Otsego Township, and he served in that office 
until January i, 1915. They further testified to 
their appreciation of his abilities by electing him 
commissioner of Steuben County in 1917, he assum- 
ing the duties of that office in 1918. 

From boyhood it was Mr. Brown's ambition to 
become the owner of a farm of considerable size, 
but never did his fondest hopes attain to the reality 
of today. He is essentially a self-made man, is 
proud of the fact, and has every reason to look with 
pride on what he has accomplished. Not only is he 
a man of wealth, he is much more, a man of the 
highest character, whose stability and power of 
concentration have placed him among the worth- 
while men of his state. His present prosperity has 
been attained after almost increditable persistence 
and determination, and while he has made such a 
material advance, he is still the incarnation of 
probity and kindness, of steadfast devotion to his 
duty as he sees it, and the needs of the whole com- 
munity. He is living a life full of inspiration to 
his neighbors, and it is but natural that he shoujd 
receive popular recognition in the future as he has 
in the past. 

On March i, 1888, Mr. Brown was united in mar- 
riage with Alma M. Williams, a daughter of 
Ephraim B. and Martha (Cooper) Williams, and 
they have one son, Harold F., who is engaged in 
farming with his father. This son married Pearl 
Lautzenheiser, and they have a daughter, Zelda 
Ruth. 

Ephraim B. Williams was born in Orleans County, 
New York, January 10, 1833, tlie fifth child 6i 
Henry R. and Mary Ann (Case) Williams, who 
brought their family to Jackson Township, Steuben 
County, Indiana, in 1836, their arrival in the county 
being saddened by the death of the good mother 
December 2d of that same year, of tuberculosis. 
She had borne her husband the following children : 
Hamilton. Maria, Wallace, Ephraim B. and one who 
died in infancy. Two years later Henry R. Williams 
was married to Philma Town, and in 1842 removal 
was made to Otsego Township, where he bought 100 
acres in section 9, and there he died October 9, 



1.S79, when in the eighty-fourth year of his life. 
His widow survived him until 1882. There were 
no children of the second marriage. 

The boyhood and youth of Ephraim B. Williams 
was spent in Steuben County, he alternating attend- 
ance in the district schools with hard work on the 
farm of his father, and he grew up strong and self- 
reliant, so that when he began farming on his own 
account he had a practical knowledge of the work 
and was able to carry it on successfully. He bought 
a farm in section 17, Otsego Township, and 
was engaged in agricultural work all his active life, 
becoming one of the wealthy men of his neighbor- 
hood, and the owner of 280 acres of valuable land. 
In 1893 he moved to Angola, where he lived in 
retirement until his death, September 28, 1905. 

In 1857 Ephraim B. Williams was united in mar- 
riage with Susan Pearce, and she died June 15, 
1863. On February 18, 1864, Mr. Williams was 
married to Martha Cooper, and they had three chil- 
dren, namely : Alma, Lucy and Susan. In his 
political views Mr. Williams was a republican, and 
always supported the candidates of his party. 

Martlia (Cooper) Williams was born in Berks 
County, Pennsylvania, August 27, 1833, a daughter 
of William and Lucy (Thomas) Cooper, both of 
whom were natives of Pennsylvania. In 1844 
William Cooper came from Pennsylvania to Steuben 
County, Indiana, locating in Richland Township, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, dying in 
1868. He and his wife had the following children : 
Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Sarah and Anna. 

Ellis Smith is counted among the progressive 
farmers who have done most for the agricultural 
uplift in Perry Township of Noble County. Mr. 
Smith has for thirty years or more been a farmer, 
and owns a fine farm and corresponding improve- 
ments in section 32 of Perry Township. 

He was born on an adjoining farm in the same 
township February 7, 1864, a son of Benjamin F. 
and Charity (Lane) Smith. His father was twelve 
years old when brought to Noble County and was 
a son of Jacob and Abigail (Bloomer) Smith. Ben- 
jafnin Smith's early education was largely neglected, 
and he was put on his own responsibility at an 
early age. How well he made use of his oppor- 
tunity in his struggle with adversity is indicated by 
his accumulation of 230 acres of land. He was 
a republican in politics. He and his wife had ten 
children. Those still living are: Emma, wife of 
Emmett Caldwell; Ellis; Hattie, wife of Andrew 
Umbenhower; Howard, of Kentucky; William H., 
of Whitley County; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Cass, of Perry Township, on the old homestead of 
her father; and Clara, wife of Thomas Kensler, of 
Panama. 

Ellis Smith grew up on his father's farm and ac- 
quired a common school education. He lived at 
home to the age of twenty-four. On October 3, 
1888, Miss Anna Earll became his wife. She was 
born in Noble County in August, 1863. Six children 
have been born to their marriage : Ralph, the old- 
est, married Ruth Harper. Emmett is a graduate 
of the Ligonier High School, attended the Tri-State 
Normal at Angola, and has been a teacher. He 
married Henrietta Murry and is now a farmer. 
Ruth, the youngest of the family is a graduate of the 
common schools, attended the State College at An- 
gola, and is a successful teacher in Sparta Town- 
ship. Three are deceased, Ben E., Frank L., and 
Albert. 

Mr. Smith as a farmer specializes in registered 
Hereford cattle. He owns 285 acres, all joining 
and in one farm. He is a stockholder in the Farm- 



104 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



ers Elevator at Ligonier and also of the Citizens 
Bank of that city. Politically he is affiliated with 
the republican party. 

Charles J. Walker^ whose home and farm are in 
Union Township lYz miles east of Auburn, is a 
member of an old and prominent family in DeKalb 
County. 

His grandfather, John R. Walker, was born in 
Yorktown, Pennsylvania, in 1808, and married Cath- 
erine Frumrine. In 1835 he moved to Columbiana 
County, Ohio, and in 1844 came to DeKalb County 
and bought 160 acres in section 35 of Smithfield 
Township. He cleared most of the timber from 
the land and in i860 bought another quarter section. 

George K. Walker, a son of this pioneer, was 
born in Indiana, in Smithfield Township, and mar- 
ried Anna Ashelman. She was a daughter of John 
W. Ashelman, who became one of the largest land 
owners in DeKalb County. George K. Walker and 
wife were married in DeKalb County and are now 
living at Waterloo, Indiana. They are members of 
the United Brethren Church and the father is a 
democrat in politics. There are four children : 
John, of Grant Township ; Alice, wife of Charles 
O. Spear; William, of Smithfield Township; and 
Charles J. 

Charles J. Walker, who was born on a farm in 
Smithfield Township December 3, 1880, was edu- 
cated there in the district schools and is a graduate 
of the Waterloo High School. For ten years he 
has been a prosperous farmer and a breeder of 
Holstein cattle. He is a democrat and he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. December 24, 1912, he married Mary Funk. 
She was born in Allen County, Indiana. 

Theo Wright is a citizen who has been identified 
with the affairs of Sparta Township for thirty 
years or more, and always in some useful and 
public-spirited way. He is a practical farmer and 
his home is three miles southeast of Cromwell, in 
section 27. 

He was born in the same township February 15, 
1868, son of Alexander and Margaret (Hull) 
Wright. His parents were natives of Ohio, but 
were married after they came to Noble County, 
and then lived on a farm in Sparta Township. 
Alexander Wright had a record as a Union soldier 
during the Civil war. He was for two years a 
private in Company A of the Ninth Ohio Cavalry. 
After the war he joined the Grand Army of the 
Republic and was a republican in politics and served 
as road supervisor for Sparta Township. He and 
his wife had five children: Theo; W. R., a hard- 
ware merchant at Cromwell ; Rosa, wife of William 
Crow; Melvin, a farmer in Whitley County; and 
Arthur, also of Whitley County, Indiana. 

Theo Wright grew up on his father's farm, had 
a district school education, and when fourteen 
started out to make his own way in the world and 
his experiences and achievements since then have 
indicated his self-reliance, his initiative and energy 
in making the best of his opportunities. He has 
always been a hard worker, but reached the age of 
twenty-one with very little capital. 

February 11, 1891, he married Clara A. Galloway, 
a daughter of Anderson Galloway, a well-known 
citizen of Noble County elsewhere referred to. 
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Wright rented 
the Scott Galloway farm for several years. They 
are the parents of three children. Ercell is a farmer 
in Kosciusko County ; Clarence served with Re- 
mount Squadron No. 323 with the Expeditionary 
Forces in France ; Elma is a graduate of the com- 
mon schools and now a student in high school. 



Mr. Wright is the present assessor of Sparta 
Township. He is also a director in the Farmers 
Mutual .^id Association, and is a leading republican. 
He is now in his second term as township assessor, 
serving one term of four years and being re-elected 
for a consecutive term. He is a past chancellor of 
the Knights of Pythias, past grand of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and also a member 
of Cromwell Lodge No. 705, Free and Accepted 
Masons. Mr. Wright and family reside on a farm 
of twenty-three acres. 

Archie L. Carpenter, who has spent all his life 
in Northeast Indiana, is a capable young farmer, 
a resident of Clear Spring Township, LaGrange 
County, in which locality he has had his home 
since about the time he received his first instruc- 
tion in the common schools. He was born in Noble 
County, December 9, 1876, a son of John and Lu- 
celia (Hervey) Carpenter. His mother was born 
in Clear Spring Township, LaGrange County, in 
1840. His father was born in May, 1837, in Cass 
County, Michigan. After his parents married they 
settled in Noble County and later moved to La- 
Grange County. The father was a republican and 
the mother a member of the Methodist Church. Of 
their three children two are still living: Warren 
W., deceased ; Ella, widow of Abe Gipson ; and 
Archie L. 

Archie L. Carpenter was six years old when his 
parents moved to LaGrange County, and he grew 
up on the farm which he owns today. He has 
fifty acres of land, well cultivated and improved, 
and constituting one of the good homes of that 
part of the county. He received his early education 
in the district schools. 

In 1896 he married Miss Esta Bowman. She is a 
native of Elkhart County, Indiana, and received 
a common school education. To their marriage have 
been born eight children : Adren, a farmer, married 
and living on the home farm ; Lee, who is married 
and is a farmer; Elsie, wife of Mr. Poiser ; Miles, 
Retha, Kenneth, Fern and Ruby, who are the 
younger children still at home. Mr. Carpenter is 
a republican and a member of the Church of the 
Brethren. 

Daniel J. Yoder. While he has reached that en- 
viable period in life when he might be classified as 
retired, Mr. Yoder is still living on his farm a 
mile west and half a mile south of Topeka. He 
has turned over the burdens of management of this 
farm to his son, and has lived in that same place 
since his marriage. 

Mr. Yoder was born in LaGrange County October 
12, 1857, a son of John S. and Catherine (Stahley) 
Yoder, the former a native of Mifflin County, Penn- 
sylvania, and the latter of Stark County, Ohio. His 
parents were married in Indiana, and spent the 
rest of their days in LaGrange County. They were 
active members of the Maple Grove Mennonite 
Church, and the father was a republican voter. 
Their five children were : Samuel W., of Eden 
Township; Daniel J.; Emanuel C, of Goshen; Mel- 
vin A., of Eden Township ; and Alvin E., of 
Goshen. 

Daniel J. Yoder attended district school and lived 
at home to the age of twenty-one, and helped his 
father run the homestead for several years. On 
February 18, 1886, he married Emma C. Burkholder. 
She was born in Wayne County, Ohio, February 
29, i860, grew up in that county and attended the 
common schools there. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Yoder began farming on the place which 
they still own and where they still reside. They are 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



105 



members of the Maple Grove Mennonite Church. 
Mr. Yoder is a republican and a stockholder in the 
State Bank of Topeka. His farm is well stocked 
with grade Holstein cattle and a specialty of the 
farming is the raising of pure blood White Leghorn 
chickens. 

Their only son, Edwin J. Yoder, was born Decem- 
ber 2, 1889. He is a high class young farmer with 
an interest in the scientific as well as the practical 
side of agriculture. He graduated from the Topeka 
High School, attended Goshen College and also took 
a course in Purdue University. He married Mollie 
Stoltzfus, and their three children are Geneva, born 
January 7, 1914; Gerald, born December 6, 191 5; and 
Gladys Louise, born June 5, 1919. 

Sherman Strawser. Though a resident of the 
village of Salem Center, Sherman Strawser is still 
active in the management of his extensive farming 
interests in Salem Township. He has worked the 
lands and raised crops in that vicinity for thirty 
years or more, and to some extent still specializes 
as an onion grower. 

Mr. Strawser was born in Defiance County, Ohio, 
November 8, 1864, a son of George W. and Rhoda 
J. (Rose) Strawser. His father, who died May 26, 
1914, at Hudson, where he had lived for several 
years, was a native of Ross County, Ohio, but from 
1843 grew up in Defiance County. On August 15, 
1861, he enlisted in Company D of the Thirty-Eighth 
Ohio Infantry, and served until July, 1865, nearly 
four years. He was color bearer of his regiment in 
the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Stone River, Chick- 
amauga, Missionary Ridge and Jonesboro. The 
Thirty-Eighth Ohio was one of the hardest fighting 
regiments in the war. George W. Strawser was 
wounded at Jonesboro, where his regiment lost 
heavily. After the war he returned to Ohio and 
married Rhoda J. Rose, who was then the widow 
Higbea, her first husband having died while a Union 
soldier in 1863. In 1872 George W. Strawser moved 
to Steuben County and in 1881 bought a farm of 
170 acres in section 21 of Salem Township. He 
and his wife had five children : W. T. Sherman, 
Amanda J., George D., Mary C. and John W. 

Sherman Strawser attended his first school in 
Defiance County and from the age of eight has lived 
in Steuben County, where he attended school in 
Otsego Township. He also for a time was a student 
in the schools of Salem Center. He began working 
on his father's home farm two miles south of Salem 
Center and later became independent manager of 
that place, which he farmed continuously until 1916. 
He has since rented the farm to his son. Earl, and 
in the spring of 1919 moved to a comfortable home 
in the village of Salem Center. He owns 170 acres 
formerly owned by his father, and during his pro- 
prietorship has rebuilt the barn and put on several 
other buildings. Mr. Strawser is affiliated with the 
Masons, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to the 
Masonic Lodge at Hudson and the Odd Fellows at 
Salem Center. 

In 1890 he married Miss Delia M. Anstett, a 
daughter of George W. and Mary Jane (Wilsey) 
Anstett. Mr. and Mrs. Strawser have seven chil- 
dren, named George Earl, Verna May. Verda J., 
Carl, Wayne, Wade and Ruby. The first four are 
married. George L. married Emma Wilcox ; Verna 
is the wife of Daniel Tritch and has two children, 
Philus and Fay, Verda is the wife of Ralph Daily; 
while Carl married Imo J. Bassett and has a daugh- 
ter, Mildred. 

FiNLEY C. Fuller is known to a majority of 
citizens all over Noble County, and every one in 



York Township knows and esteems him for his 
success in life and the high stand he has taken 
as a citizen and neighbor and friend. 

The farm that he now owns was the scene of 
his birth on May i, 1856. He is a son of Robert L. 
and Margaret J. (Coleman) Fuller, his father hav- 
ing been born in New Jersey July 10, 1822, and his 
mother in Guernsey County, Ohio. Robert L. Ful- 
ler went to Ohio and married in Guernsey County, 
and after four or five years there moved to Noble 
County, Indiana, in 1854. At that time he acquired 
the land contained in the present farm of his son 
Finley, and altogether owned 200 acres. He was 
one of the prosperous farmers of his generation, 
and a man active in other lines, prominent in the 
Methodist Church and a stanch republican. There 
were five children in the family and the three still 
living are: Basil, a retired farmer in York Town- 
ship ; Finley C. ; and Alice, wife of Frank Bennett, 
of Warsaw, Indiana. 

Finley C. Fuller grew up on the home farm and 
had a district school education. At the age of 
eighteen he began learning the carpenter's trade, 
and for forty-four years of his life he followed 
contracting, and he still takes contracts. He owns 
and lives on his farm of 184 acres in sections 24 
and 32 of York Township. 

November 21, 1877, Mr. Fuller married Samantha 
Ann Waltman. She was born in Noble County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fuller have four living children: 
Bessie, a graduate of the common schools, is the 
wife of Orpheus Earnhart and lives in Elkhart 
County, Indiana: Mabel is a graduate of the com- 
mon schools and was also well trained in music, 
and is the wife of Marion C. Hursey of South 
Bordman, Michigan; Bertha is a graduate of the 
common schools and the wife of James Dazey, and 
they live on the farm with her father; and Harry 
B. is engaged in contracting with his father. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fuller are members of the Presbyterian 
Church and he is one of the elders in the York 
Church. He is affiliated with Albion Lodge No. 97, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, with Kendall- 
ville Chapter No. 64, Royal Arch Masons, and both 
he and his wife are members of Prentiss Chapter 
of the Eastern Star at Albion. In politics Mr. 
Fuller has given stanch allegiance to the republican 
party since he cast his first vote. The people of 
York Township still have grateful appreciation of 
the service he rendered as trustee from 1891 to 
1805. He was also for two years a member of the 
County Council. 

Henry P. Weimer. The best years of his life 
Henry P. Weimer has given to the business of 
farming, and the results of his eflforts stand out 
conspicuously to the traveler through .Allen Town- 
ship of Noble County. Mr. Weimer's farm is four 
miles southwest of Kendallville. 

He was born in Allen Township, September 23, 
1866. a son of Adam and Mary (Hess) Weimer. 
His father was born in Germany, July 29, 1819, and 
there learned the trade of shoemaker. On coming 
to the United States he located in Toledo, Ohio, 
and married there Mary Hess. She was born in 
Germany in 1832 and came to the United States on 
the same vessel with her future husband. Adam 
Weimer worked steadily at his trade as a shoe- 
maker in Toledo two years, and one of his chil- 
dren was born there. Later he moved to Fort 
Wayne, worked at his trade there several years, 
and in the meantime invested in forty acres of raw 
land in Allen Township, Noble County. About 
1851 he moved his family to this land, and he was 
steadily identified with the farm and with the local 
citizenship the rest of his days. He died honored 



106 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



and respected July 27, 1903, and his wife died July 
27. 1800. In their family were eleven children, and 
the six still living are John, Adam, Charles, Henry 
P., Lizzie and Paul. 

Henrv P. Weimer grew up on the old farm in 
Allen Township, and since reaching manhood has 
made his own way in the world. He had a common 
school education, and at the age of twenty-one left 
home to become a farm laborer. Since then he 
has graduated into the role of an independent 
farmer, and now has eighty acres, of good soil, 
well cultivated, and constituting one of the best 
farms of Allen Township. 

November 18, 1897, he married Miss Dora Diehm. 
She was born in .Mien Township, February 16. 1872, 
a daughter of George and Johanna (Wehmeyer) 
Diehm. Her father was born in Noble County, 
Indiana. Her mother was born in Germany and 
was brought to the United States at the age of 
twenty-one. Mr. and Mrs. Weimer have one 
daughter. Elsie H., born September 13, 1899. She 
graduated from the common schools in 1915 and 
is still at home. The family are all members of 
the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Weimer is an 
independent voter. 

Gkorge Straw is the present assessor of Clear 
Lake Township, beginning the duties of that office 
when his term as township trustee left ofif. That 
is evidence of his high standing as a citizen, and 
he is also one of the capable farmers of that locality 
and has spent the greater part of his life as an 
agriculturist in Steuben County. 

The history of Steuben Count>'! has frequent 
records concerning the Straw family. His grand- 
father, Frederick Straw, was born in Pennsylvania, 
June 9. 181 1, a son of George and Elizabeth (Gear- 
hart) Straw. Frederick Straw came from Pennsyl- 
vania to Steuben County in the spring of 1856, 
buying land just west of Fremont. He became 
owner of 180 acres, constituting one of the best 
farms in the township. Frederick Straw was a 
democrat until the republican party came into ex- 
istence, and after that affiliated with the new organ- 
ization. In 1832 he married Catherine Wagner, who 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1813. She died in 
1871, the mother of eight children: Elias, Anna, 
Elizabeth, George W., Frederick, Amanda, Benja- 
min and Philip A. 

Elias Straw, father of George Straw, was born 
in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, November 9, 
1834, and died in 1892. In 1855 he married Cath- 
erine Baker, a native of the same county, born in 
1839, a daughter of Frederick Baker. The year 
after their marriage they came to Steuben County, 
locating at Fremont when it contained only two 
general stores. Elias Straw soon bought land in 
section 28 of Fremont Township, and in 1864 ac- 
quired another farm of 120 acres, where he spent 
the rest of his active life. He was a republican, and 
he and his wife were members of the Evangelical 
Association. They had eight children: William, 
John, Albert, Granville, George, Harvey, Augusta 
Jane and Hermie. 

George Straw who was born in Fremont Town- 
ship, August 2, 1868, acquired his education in the 
district schools there and the high school at the 
Village of Fremont. Along with farming he has 
had much business experience. As a young man 
he clerked a year in a dry goods store at the Village 
of Ray. In 1890 he went to Iowa and was a sales- 
man of agricultural machinery, with headquarters 
at Columbus Junction, for one year. On his return 
from Iowa he began farming in Fremont Township, 
lived there until 1909, and then sold his property and 



his present place in Clear Lake Township. 
He has 112 acres in section 18, and during his own- 
ership all the buildings have been remodeled and 
improved. He handles much good stock, being a 
breeder of Holstein cattle. 

Mr. Straw served as township trustee from 1914 
to 1919, and in the fall of 1918 was elected assessor. 

In 1891 he married Miss Lulie Young, a daughter 
of L. I. C. and Elizabeth (Potter) Young. Her 
father was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, in 1837, 
a son of Charles and Nancy (Scothorn) Young, the 
former a native of Pennsj'lvania and the latter of 
Virginia. His parents were married in Ohio in 
1818, and his father spent most of his active life as 
a farmer in Sandusky County. L. I. C. Young grew 
up on the home farm with his widowed mother, and 
in 1858 came to Steuben Township and settled in 
section 18 of Clear Lake Township. He taught 
school and worked his farm alternately, and in 1862 
enlisted in Company A of the Twenty-Ninth Indiana 
Infantry. Though sick part of the time, he was with 
his command until October, 1865. After the war 
he resumed farming and also became prominent in 
local affairs. L. I. C. Young married Elizabeth S. 
Potter in 1862. They had eight children : Theresa 
M., J. Orville, Lulie E., who was born Septerriber 
26, 1868, Armina V., Ozra V., Eda Z., Amie P. and 
Mattie E. 

Mr. and Mrs. Straw are the parents of five chil- 
dren, Walter, Clayton, Hubert, Edith and Lewis. 
Walter married i3essie McTaggart and Clayton 
married Beulah Duguid. The son, Walter, saw 
some of the heaviest fighting in the great war. He 
went overseas with the Eighty-Fifth Division, land- 
ing in France August 2, 1918. He was soon trans- 
ferred to the 139th Infantry in the Thirty-Fifth 
Division, and before the signing of the armistice 
was under fire for twenty-one days. The heaviest 
fighting seen by any American division was in the 
Argonne Forest, and he was a participant there. 
During 1919 he has been a student in the university 
maintained for the "Men in Khaki" at Lyons, 
France. The son. Hubert Straw, was also in train- 
ing for military duty, being a student of electricity 
at Washington, D. C. He was taken ill with the in- 
fluenza there and in the spring of 1919 was still in 
a military hospital. 

Orlando C. Bassett has spent his life in La- 
Grange County almost entirely as a farmer, though 
he is now 'associated as a partner with his son in 
a successful merchandise business at Appleman- 
burg. 

He was born in Milford Township May 19, 1867. 
His grandparents were George W. and Samantha 
Bassett, both natives of New York, the former 
born .August 6, 1805, and the latter September 16, 
1806. They were married September 28, 1826, and 
in the fall of 1833 moved to Brockport, New York. 
Some years later they came to LaGrange County 
and settled four miles east of LaGrange and sub- 
sequently moved to Milford Township, where they 
lived on a farm. George W. Bassett and his son 
Lucas Bassett, who was a native of New York, 
bought eighty acres in Milford Township, cleared 
and improved a good farm there and put up some 
excellent buildings for the time, including a good 
home, a bank barn, and other structures. On Au- 
gust 23, 1866, Lucas Bassett married Christina Wy- 
cuff. They were married by Squire Starkey. She 
was born in Pennsylvania July 22, 1850, a daughter 
of Jesse and Katherine Wycuff, who subsequently- 
moved to Ashland County, Ohio, where her father 
died in 1862. She and her widowed mother then 
moved to Noble County, Indiana, where her mother 
died soon afterward. Lucas Bassett was a demo- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



crat in politics, casting his first vote for Buchanan. 
He died Decemlier 8, 1912, His cliildren were Or- 
lando, Cora Adele, Franklin, Emma J., George, 
Christina and Mabel. 

Orlando C. Bassett was educated in the public 
schools of LaGrange County and after leaving the 
home place he bought forty-seven acres of the old 
Daniel Wert farm. He sold tliat and in 1901 bought 
120 acres in Springfield Township from the John 
M. Wade estate. .Another forty acres he acquired 
in 1902 and now has a 160 acre farm well developed 
for general crops and stock. In 1914 he bought 
his father's old place and occupied it a year and 
a half, when he sold and returned to his farm in 
Springfield Township where he now resides. Mr. 
Bassett on January 4, IQ19, bought the mercantile 
business at ,\pplemanburg, and his son Lloyd is now 
a manager of the store. Mr. Bassett has been an 
influential man in local afltairs, and though a dem- 
ocrat he was elected township trustee, being the 
only trustee of that political faith in the township. 
He also served as assessor of Springfield Township 
for six years in succession. 

March 10. 1889, he married Rosa Gross. She 
was born in Milford Township October 8, 1868, a 
daughter of William and Isabel (Francis) Gross. 
Her father was born in Pennsylvania in 1844 and 
her mother in Noble County, Indiana, October i, 
1848. The Gross family moved from Pennsylvania 
to Ohio where the father of William Gross was in 
the hotel business and subsequently came to Mil- 
ford Township and bought the farm known as the 
John Forst farm. .After a few years the grandpar- 
ents moved to Tennessee, and acquired about 400 
acres near Spring City, where both of them spent 
the rest of their days. William Gross remained in 
Milford Township, married there, and acquired a 
farm of eighty acres on which he lived until his 
death in 1884. His widow is still living, a resident 
of South Milford, where she bought the Wonders 
property. William Gross was a democrat and his 
parents were members of the Lutheran Church. 
Mrs. Rose Bassett is the oldest of her father's chil- 
dren. Her sister Mattie I. was born April 21, 1870, 
and is the wife of Herbert Xewnam of Milford 
Township and has one child, Grossie. Her other 
sister Nettie L. is the wife of George W. Lovett 
and has two sons, Jesse and Lester. 

Mrs. Bassett's maternal grandfather Samuel Fran- 
cis was born in Bradford, Connecticut, June 14, 
181 1, and as a youth moved to Genessee County, 
New York, and from there in 1836, soon after his 
marriage to Sarah Combes, came to Indiana and set- 
tled in Swan Township of Noble County. He en- 
tered land from the Government, cleared and made 
a home there, and in 1853 bought about 200 acres 
of the old Colonel Cochran farm in Milford Town- 
ship of LaGrange County. He lived there until 
1874 when he moved to Kendallville where his wife 
died, and in 1879 he went to Fort Wayne and mar- 
ried Mary Miller. He died at Kendallville Febru- 
ary 15, looi. In the Francis family were seven 
children, Welton, Sylvester, Isabel. Elbridge, Eliza, 
Mattie and one son that died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bassett have two children. Lloyd 
and Velma Luella. Lloyd was born October 23, 
1893, had a good education, being a graduate of the 
Springfield Township and the LaGrange High 
Schools. He was formerly manager of the Mount 
Pisgah Mercantile Association for two years, and 
then removed to Applemanburg to take charge of 
his father's business. On December 23, 1914, he 
married Miss Lucile Faust of Springfield Township. 
They have a daughter, Eileen, born December 2, 
1916. 



Yclma Luella Bassett was horn May 23, 1900, 
is a graduate of the Springfield Township and La- 
Grange High Schools, also attended the Tri-State 
College at .Angola, and is now assistant cashier of 
the Farmers State Bank at Stroh. 

John A. Thunander is a resident of Noble 
County who appreciates the value and opportunity 
of American citizenship, and in turn his own sub- 
stantial character, his enviable work and enterprise 
are thoroughly appreciated in the community where 
he has lived and worked out his destiny and success 
during a period of thirty years. He is a farmer 
in section 36 of Sparta Township. 

Mr. Thunander was born in Sweden, November 
26, 1856, son of Erickson and Christina (Lyon) 
Thunander. His parents spent all their lives in 
Sweden, and his father was a contractor and 
builder by profession. Both parents were very 
active members of the Lutheran Church. Erickson 
was chorister in the church for forty years, and 
that was his chief interest outside of his business 
and home. Of eight children six are still living: 
Carl, a farmer in Sweden; John A.; Claus, of 
Elkhart, Indiana ; .Anna, unmarried, and still living 
in Sweden; Alfred, a Swedish farmer; and Oscar, 
also farming in Sweden. 

John .A. Thunander grew up on a farm in his 
native land, attended the common schools, and at 
the age of eight started out to make his own living. 
He remained in Sweden until he was twenty-seven 
years of age. In April, 1884, he landed in New 
York City and name direct to Ligonier, Indiana, 
to join his brother. During the next two years he 
was a laborer at monthly wages in Elkhart County. 

On December 4, 1888, he married Matilda Walter. 
She was born in Sweden July 12, 1862, attended 
school there, and came to the United States in 
September, 1887, from the same locality as her 
husband. She lived near Ligonier until her mar- 
riage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thunander rented a house and 
during the following three years he supported his 
little family chiefly by day work. He was a ditch 
digger and accepted any other employment which 
would earn him an honest living. He then moved 
to York Township and rented a farm, and they 
remained on one place for nine years. For four 
years he rented the Orlando Kimmell farm, and 
then with the savings of fifteen years or more bought 
eighty acres in Sparta Township. He has since 
increased this to 100 acres, and is now the fortunate 
possessor of a good farm and has a home with all 
the improvements. His farm is well stocked. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thunander had one child, who died 
when a week old. They took into their home Wayne 
Scott Breece when five years old, and carefully 
reared him and gave him a good education. He 
graduated from the common schools at the age 
of fourteen, later from the Wolf Lake High School, 
and also attended South Bend Business College. 
This adopted son married Lena LeCount, and they 
have one daughter, Bertie May. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thunander arc active members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church at Kimmell, and 
he gives as much time to church duties as did his 
father. Mr. Thunander is treasurer, steward, trus- 
tee and class leader of the church. He has also 
served as township supervisor, is a republican in 
politics, and is a past grand of Sparta Lodge No. 
773 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

John L. Crothers. For over fifty years the name 
Crothers has been spoken in Noble County with 
the respect due a family of more than ordinary 



108 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



intelligence, business ability, energy and resource- 
fulness. Representing the third generation of the 
name John L. Crothers learned a mechanical trade 
as a youth, still continues it, but is also a farmer 
and one of the leading onion growers of Allen 
Township. 

Mr. Crothers was born in Green Township of that 
county, December 30, 1882, a son of Cyrus and 
Mary (McCoy) Crothers. His parents were both 
born in Green Township of Noble County. The 
grandfather, Lafayette Crothers, was a native of 
Ohio, married Martha Beard, and they arrived in 
Noble County about 1855, settling on a farm in 
Green Township, where they spent the rest of 
their days. Their four children were Viana Parker, 
Cyrus, W. C. and Leslie, all of whom are still 
living. After his marriage Cyrus Crothers settled 
on a farm and lived there until 1906, when he 
moved to another farm in the county. He and his 
wife were members of the Methodist Protestant 
Church, and he was a republican. Cyrus Crothers 
and wife had four children: John L. ; Lettisha, 
wife of Ernest Rawson, of Kendallville ; Lafayette, 
a farmer in York Township; and Arthur, of Ken- 
dallville. 

John L. Crothers grew up on a farm in Green 
Township and received his education in the local 
schools. When only fifteen years of age he began 
learning the trade of plasterer, and has followed 
that occupation in the intervals of his other busmess 
affairs to the present time. He now owns a good 
farm of eighty acres in Allen Township, and has 
nineteen acres of good muck soil devoted to onion 
culture. His average crop is about 8,000 bushels a 
year. He also raises the other crops suitable to a 
general farm. 

April 14. 1901, he married Miss Mina Hetzel, who 
was born in York Township of Noble County and 
was educated in the public schools. They have four 
children: Floyd, Coy, Martha and Kenneth. Mr. 
Crothers is a republican. 

Maurice McClew, a former member of the Legis- 
lature from Steuben County, a farmer and a lawyer 
by profession, represents some of the oldest names 
identified with the early history of Steuben County. 

He was born at Fremont in that county. May 5. 
1879, a son of Charles and Mary (Farnham) Mc- 
Clew. His great-grandfather, David McClew, was 
a native of Scotland, and on coming to this country 
prior to the Revolutionary war settled in New York 
and passed his last years in Niagara County of 
that state. 

The founder of the family in Steuben County 
was grandfather John McClew, a native of New 
York, who came to Steuben County in 1836 and 
brought his family here the following year. He was 
one of the first settlers of Fremont Township, taking 
up eighty acres of Government land. Eventually he 
owned several farms, followed the carpenter's trade, 
was a man of great influence and substantial char- 
acter. For eleven years he served as a county com- 
missioner. In early life he was a Presbyterian and 
later a Methodist, and in politics he was allied with 
the whigs and later the republicans. He died at 
Fremont in February, 1891. 

Charles McClew, son of this pioneer, was born in 
Steuben County, December 27, 1842. His wife, 
Mary Farnham, was born in the same county, April 
3, 1846, a daughter of Erastus and Lucinda (Brad- 
ley) Farnham, the former a native of Delaware 
County, New York, and the latter of Connecticut. 
Erastus Farnham came to Fremont Township in 
1836. Prior to coming here he had taught school 
in twelve different states. He was a surveyor by 



profession, and at one time held the offices of 
county surveyor and county treasurer in Steuben 
County. He died in 1873, at the age of seventy-one. 

Charles McClew was educated in public schools 
and the Orland Academy, was a teacher for about 
two years, and otherwise a farmer, owning farms 
in Pleasant and Jamestown townships. He was a 
republican in politics. He and his wife had three 
children: Maurice; Bell, wife of Claud Neer, a 
mining engineer at Denver, Colorado; and John J., 
an engineer at San Jose, California. Charles Mc- 
Clew's wife by a previous marriage to Henry M. 
Willis had two children, Estella, who died in Sep- 
tember, 1914, the wife of Lorenzo D. Creel, of An- 
gola, and Elizabeth, wife of John J. Gavin, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Maurice McClew grew up on his father's farm in 
Pleasant Township, attended public schools there, 
the Normal School at Angola, and like several of 
his ancestors, was a teacher in early life. He 
studied law with Brown & Carlin for a year and a 
half, was admitted to the bar in 1905, and spent about 
a year in the West. He has been successfully en- 
gaged in farming in addition to his law work. Mr. 
McClew was elected a member of the Legislature in 
1910, on the republican ticket. He is affiliated with 
the Masonic Lodge at Angola and at the age of 
twenty-three was elected master of the Grange in 
Fremont Township. 

June 10, 1917, in Chicago, he married Nora Hurd. 
She is a member of the Christian Church and the 
Eastern Star. 

Daniel J. Bontrager. This family name is prac- 
tically synonymous with good farming, good citizen- 
ship and individual prosperity in many localities of 
Northeast Indiana. Daniel J. Bontrager, whose ef- 
forts have brought him the ownership of a large 
and well managed farm in Van Buren Township of 
LaGrange County, is a son of John J. and Fannie 
(Kauffman) Bontrager. Much of the information 
concerning other members of the family will be 
found on other pages of this publication. 

Daniel J. Bontrager was born in Eden Township 
December 25, i860. He was reared and attended 
district schools in Van Buren, and has applied his 
chief efforts and experience as a farmer in that 
locality. He bought his first land, about seventy- 
eight acres, in section 31, in 1887, and during the 
thirty odd years since then h:.s seen his possessions 
expand until they now include 400 acres in sections 
31 and 30 of Van Buren and forty-six acres in New- 
bury townships. All of this land is under general 
cultivation and he has always made live stock a 
feature of his business. 

December 23, 1886, he married Lovina Mast. She 
was born in Newbury Township November 14, 1866, 
a daughter of Jacob and Susie (Bontrager) Mast. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bontrager and family are members 
of the Amish Old Order Mennonite Church. Since 
its organization he has been secretary and treasurer 
of the Farmers Threshing Association. 

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Bontrager comprise 
nine children, named in order of birth : Jacob, John, 
Levi, Susie, Moses, Gideon. Fannie, Daniel and 
Katie. Jacob married Fannie Schrock, and they 
have six children, named Simon, Clara, Laura, 
Daniel, Viola and Ida. Levi married Lizzie Graber 
and has two daughters, C'adys and Viola. Susie is 
the wife of Milo Miller, and her children are Erwin 
and Mahlon. 

Harry C. Kankamp. Among the younger men 
who have already won recognition as capable farm- 
ers in Steuben County, one of the most conspicuous 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



109 



is Harry C. Kankamp, who only recently turned 
his majority, but has the responsibility and is suc- 
cessfully looking after all departments of a large 
farm in Steuben Township. 

Mr. Kankamp is a son of Fred and Etta (Hayden) 
Kankamp, more particularly referred to on other 
pages of this publication. He was born on the home 
farm in Pleasant Township October 6, 1896, grew 
up in a good home, acquired a good education in 
local schools and in the Angola High School, sup- 
plemented by a course in the Tri-State Normal Col- 
lege. The farm he operates comprises 251 acres 
two miles southeast of Angola. It is one of the 
good and well improved farms of the township, 
and Mr. Kankamp is using it for general farming 
and stock raising purposes, specializing in pure 
bred Shropshire sheep and Duroc Jersey hogs. 

In politics he is a republican. July 23, 1916, he 
married Miss Ida Mae Kain. She was born in 
Union Township of Wells County. Indiana, Febru- 
ary 15, 1898, a daughter of William Henry and 
Mary Mandilla (Fryback) Kain. Her parents are 
now living near Youngstown, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kankamp have one daughter, Mary Ellen, born 
June 2, 1917. 

David H. Renner. While so much of his life has 
been passed in the quiet environment of the farm 
in Steuben Township, his intimate friends know 
that David H. Renner has always been ready for 
duty when duty's call was heard. Those duties 
have been none the less important because they have 
been performed as part of the day's routine, and the 
same spirit has characterized his performance of 
simple and homely toils as uged him on when a 
young man in following the flag of the Union during 
the Civil war. 

Mr. Renner was born in Union County, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 21, 1837, a son of John and Julia 
Renner. His parents came to Steuben County and 
settled in section 31 of Otsego Township in 
1844. They had six children, four of whom were 
born in Pennsylvania and two in Steuben County. 
David H. Renner grew up from the age of seven 
on the old home place, acquired such education as 
was possible in the limited district schools of his 
youth, his school days being spent chiefly in District 
No. 7 of Otsego Township. He worked out as a 
farm hand, and in August, 1861, enlisted in Company 
A of the Twenty-Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 
In September he was transferred to Company E of 
the Ninth Indiana Infantry at LaPorte. The regi- 
ment to which he was transferred left at once for 
the West Virginia campaign, and except for a short 
time in a hospital at Louisville Mr. Renner was 
with his command in all its engagements. While 
in Louisville and while convalescent he was assigned 
to duty as a cook. Several times he urged his offi- 
cers to let him return to his old organization at the 
front, but he was told some one must cook and 
he had to stay. One day he and his comrades were 
paid off. It was the first money he had received 
since entering the army. His pay amounted to over 
$100. Most of it he sent to his wife, and 
then packed up his belongings. A company was 
leaving the next day for the front, going to the 
same locality where his old company was stationed. 
When this organization left the barracks Mr. Renner 
went A. W. O. L. and traveled with them. The first 
day's journey was by train. On leaving the train 
the company was lined up at a mess shack, and the 
men counted before going in. The extra member 
was then discovered and the captain asked : "Have 
one of you men deserted from Louisville and come 
along with this company?" Mr. Renner stepped 



out and replied, "Yes, sir, I did." He then explained 
to the captain why he had come. "Well, I'll be 
damned," said the captain, "hundreds of men have 
deserted to get away from the firing line, but you 
are the first to desert to get back to it." Mr. 
Renner was then issued a pass back to his old com- 
pany. That was not the first instance of his good 
soldierly qualities and his eagerness to be on the 
fighting line. While he was a recruit of Company 
A, Twenty-Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, the 
Ninth Regiment was ordered to the front. Com- 
pany E lacked about twenty men. The organization 
of Mr. Renner were then lined up and the captain 
explained the situation and asked for volunteers 
to fill out the quota of Company E. Mr. Renner 
and a number of his comrades at once stepped out 
and volunteered. He was in the army until receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge in September, 1865, 
more than four years after his enlistment. He 
left a wife and two children to go into the army, 
having married in 1857 Miss Ellen Ruthrauff. After 
the war he returned to his father's farm and then 
bought his present place of forty acres in section 
25 of Steuben Township, and has lived there 
quietly and uneventfully for over half a cen- 
tury. He now makes his home with his daughter 
Nora, and her husband is running the farm. Mr. 
Renner lost his wife by death May 28, 1912, after 
they had been married over half a century. Their 
children were : James : Frank, deceased ; Edward, 
Henry, Nora, Jacob and Isaac. Nora is the wife 
of Joseph Metzler. She has six children, named 
Lillie. Roy, Ralph, Addie, Delia and Clarence. Mr. 
Renner is proud of the fact that two of his grand- 
sons, Roy and Ralph Metzler, were American sol- 
diers in the great war. They are members of 
Company M, Thirty-Sixth Infantry, having enlisted 
May 21, 1918, and in the spring of 1919 were in camp 
in Massachusetts. 

James E. Yeiser is one of the influential citizens 
of Allen Township in Noble County. He is a prac- 
tical farmer, and farming has been his regular 
vocation all his active years. His home is two 
and a half miles west of Avilla. 

Mr. Yeiser is all but a native of Noble County, 
having been brought there when less than a year old. 
He was born in Richland County, Ohio. September 
25, 1854, a son of John and Margaret (Shambaugh) 
Yeiser, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter of Ohio. They were married in Ohio and 
in April, 1855, moved to Noble County. Indiana, 
locating in Allen Township, three and a half miles 
west of Avilla. The parents spent the rest of their 
useful lives in that community. The father was a 
republican. Of five children four are still living: 
Elizabeth, widow of Jacob Myers and now living 
with her brother, James E. ; James E. ; Mary, widow 
of P. Brooks and a resident of Oklahoma; and 
Frank C, also living in Allen Township. 

James E. Yeiser grew up on the old farm, was 
educated in the district schools and lived at home 
until past twenty-one. He sold his interest in the 
old estate and homestead, and later he and his 
sister Elizabeth bought the eighty-acre farm where 
they now reside. Elizabeth's husband, Jacob Myers, 
had died in the meantime, and she and her brother 
have since had a congenial home and an effective 
arrangement for handling the farm and the house- 
hold to their mutual satisfaction and profit. Mr. 
Yeiser is a republican in politics. 

Fred B. Kimball. Orland is a substantial com- 
munity that still reflects the spirit and qualities of 
its pioneers. It was originally known as the Ver- 



110 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



mont settlement, most of the pioneers having come 
from that state. They brought with them many of 
the outstanding characteristics of the New England- 
ers, and probably no community in Steuben County 
had at an earlier time churches, free schools and 
other evidences of culture and enlightenment of 
New England people. 

One of the early families to settle there was that 
of Kimball. Deacon Timothy Kimball reached the 
Vermont settlement in 1836, and soon afterward 
built the first grist mill on the river just north of 
the settlement. The building of this mill proved a 
boon to the community, and was patronized by 
farmers for miles around. Deacon Kimball was 
also prominent in founding the First Presbyterian 
Church at Orland, and in many other ways lent 
a helpful hand. He married Abbie Baldwin, and 
thev came with their seven children to Steuben 
County. They had left New York State in 1830, 
going to Detroit, and thence by wagon to Tekonsha 
in Calhoun County, Michigan. Deacon Timothy 
Kimball bought about 160 acres around Orland, and 
lived there the rest of his life. He was a local 
judge at one time. His children were: Augustus, 
William, Miles, Betsey, Julia, Abbie and Jerusha. 

Miles B. Kimball was born at Whitehall, New 
York, August 29, 1826. He married Elizabeth Persis 
Birce on January 9, 1862. She was a native of 
Syracuse, New York. Miles B. Kimball attended 
the first public schools taught in Orland. In 1850 
his spirit of enterprise impelled him to go to the 
California gold fields, and he stayed in the Far 
West until 1861. He was prospered in California, 
and after returning to the East he invested heavily 
in lands and bought and improved and sold a number 
of farms. He also conducted a hardware store at 
Orland, and at one time was owner of the flour 
mill known as the Greenfield Mill. He also did a 
large business in raising and dealing in sheep and 
cattle. He died September I, 1895. He and his 
wife had four children: Martha B., who married 
James Cause, a member of the Eccles Wholesale 
Lumber Company of Ogden, Utah; Fred B. ; Wil- 
liam, who was assistant law librarian and a member 
of the bar at Indianapolis at the time of his death; 
and Harry M., a resident and practising lawyer of 
Vicksburg, Michigan. 

Fred B. Kimball was born at Orland, August 12, 
1866, attended the public schools there, also Oberlin 
College at Oberlin, Ohio, and the Tri-State Normal 
College at Angola. He graduated in the commer- 
cial course at Angola. As a boy he had received 
some commercial training while helping his father 
in the hardware store. He engaged independently 
in business as a dealer in carriages and implements 
in Kansas City, and remained in that city for about 
twenty years. In 1904 he returned to Orland, bought 
a farm adjoining that town, where he has since 
lived, and has carried on extensive operations as a 
farmer, as a breeder of blooded Holstein dairy 
cattle and is, like his father, a stock dealer. 

On June 14, 1905, Mr. Kimball married Mary A. 
Wilder, daughter of Charles H. and Jennie (Scott) 
Wilder. Mrs. Kimball is a graduate of the Orland 
High School, then taught two years in the Orland 
primary grade, after which she entered Hillsdale 
College in Michigan, and for two years after her 
course there was instructor in the Orland High 
School. In the fall of 1892 she went to California 
and became a teacher, and for ten years was con- 
nected with the high school at Tulare. In 1903 she 
accepted the post of librarian at Orland. being the 
first librarian. She is active in the Congregational 
Church and a member of the Eastern Star. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kimball have two children: Miles W., 



born Ju 
1910. 



3, 1906, and Charles Scott, born July 



Samuel Stine. Out of eighty odd years of his 
long and useful life Samuel Stine has spent more 
than sixty-five of them in LaGrange County, and the 
greater part of this time has been a resident on 
one farm in Lima Township. As a farmer he has 
achieved much success, represented in a large farm, 
and in every way has been substantially identified 
with the welfare and progress ol the community. 

He was born September 19, 1836, son of Samuel 
and Catherine (Myers) Stine. His father was a 
native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Maryland. 
The Stine family came to LaGrange County in 1852 
and settled in Lima Township, on part of the land 
where Mr. Samuel Stine now lives. His father took 
up eighty acres in the midst of the woods, and the 
chief improvement was an old log house. He made 
better living arrangements by the addition of a wing 
to this house, and he lived there until his death 
six years later, February 10, i860, at the age of fifty- 
eight years, eight months and twenty-five days. The 
widowed mother survived until July 5, 1877, dying at 
the age of seventy-two years, five months and two 
days. They had a family of eight children : Mary, 
wife of John Northway; Catherine, wife of Owen 
Holmes; Rebecca, • wife of Hiram Mashon; Jane, 
wife of Abe Harding; Amanda, wife of Henry 
Wentworth; Jacob; Samuel; and Daniel, who died 
in infancy. 

Samuel Stine was reared partly in Pennsylvania 
and partly in Ohio, and was sixteen years of age 
when he came to LaGrange County. Several years 
later he acquired forty acres of land in Clay Town- 
ship, and was busily engaged in its improvement and 
cultivation. About three years after his father's 
death he traded that land for 147 acres in Lima 
Township and still later he acquired the old home- 
stead. His possessions steadily grew for a number 
of years until he had 365 acres, improved with three 
complete sets of buildings. The house in which he 
now lives was erected in 1877. He has followed 
general farming and stockraising. Mr. Stine is a 
democrat. His wife is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

On February 4, 1874, he married Mary Jane Moul- 
ton. She was born in Ohio April 10, 1839, and died 
April 9, 1915, at the age of seventy-five. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stine had one daughter. Bertha Jane. She was 
born at the old farm on July 2, 1878, was educated 
in the public schools and on June 5, 191 2, became 
the wife of Victor Camp. Mr. Camp, a widely known 
and prominent citizen of LaGrange Township, was 
born in Ohio in 1865, son of Jacob and Jane Camp, 
who came to LaGrange County and settled in Clay 
Township, where both of them spent their last years. 
Victor Camp attended public school in this county, 
also the LaGrange High School, and took a busi- 
ness course in Valparaiso. He was a teacher in La- 
Grange County for several years. In 1913 he was 
called from his farm to the duties of the office of 
county treasurer, and served one term. He has also 
been assessor of Clay Township and in other minor 
offices. Mr. Camp owns the old Camp homestead 
and is one of the directors of the elevator at Howe. 
Mr. and Mrs. Camp have one child, Stine J., born 
at LaGrange January 4, 1915- 

Mr. and Mrs, Stine also reared two children, Eva 
McManus, a niece of Mrs. Stine, and Alton Went- 
worth, a nephew of Mr. Stine. Eva McManus is 
the deceased wife of Charles Eaton. Alta Went- 
worth is a machinist living at Mishawaka, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



MoRTOx Hanselman. one of the men who have 
done most to promote and stimulate good farming 
in Steuben County, and owner of two valuable 
places in Otsego Township, is member of a family 
that has been identified with this part of northeast 
Indiana for several generations. 

Mr. Hanselman was born on the old homestead 
in Otsego Township, a son of John Quincy and 
Margaret (Kankamp) Hanselman, and grandson of 
Aaron Hanselman, who brought his family to 
Steuben Township in pioneer times. Morton Han- 
selman grew up on the home farm and was well 
educated in the local schools. During his mature 
career he has acquired a good farm of eighty acres, 
which with valuable buildings constitutes a splendid 
place for general farming and stock raising. He 
also has another farm of 136 acres in Otsego Town- 
ship adjoining his home place, and with 216 acres 
in the aggregate he is able to direct his affairs 
somewhat leisurely, and spends much of his time on 
the farm. 

August 2g, 1900, he married Miss Etta Van Auken. 
She was born in Steuben Township November 10, 
1874, a daughter of Horace M. and Elizabeth 
(McMillen) Van .A.uken, both natives of Ohio. Her 
father came to Steuben County when a young man 
with his parents, Jacob and Nancy (Straway) Van 
Auken, who were early settlers in Steuben Town- 
ship. Mrs. Hanselman's mother was the third white 
child born in Steuben County. Her parents had a 
family of eight children, three of whom died in 
infancy and the others were Ernest, Mary, Amy, 
Etta and Horace. 

V. Clare Simon is the present trustee of Swan 
Township, Noble County, and his official position is 
only a sign and symbol of his general business and 
social standing in that community, where he has 
spent most of his life as a very successful and 
progressive farmer. 

Mr. Simon was born at Goshen, Indiana, February 
25, 1868, a son of Charles and Caroline (Perry) 
Simon. His family, especially on his mother's side, 
is identified with the earliest pioneer period of Noble 
County. Caroline Perry was born in section 36 of 
Swan Township when all that district was a wilder- 
ness. Charles Simon was born in Columbiana 
County, Ohio, in 1838 and was ten years of age when 
his parents moved to Indiana and settled in Swan 
Township. V. Clare Simon was six weeks old when 
his grandmother brought him to Noble County. He 
was educated in the district schools and began farm- 
ing as soon as he reached his majority. On Febru- 
ary 25, 1895, he married Mary E. Jarrett. They 
then settled on their present place in Swan Town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Simon have three living chil- 
dren. One son, Raymond P., is deceased. Ina is the 
wife of Don Brown; Walter is a high school stu- 
dent and G.ace is also in the local high school. The 
family are members of the Lutheran Church and 
Mr. Simon was for twenty-two years on the church 
council. 

Since early manhood he has always taken an in- 
terest in the republican party. He served as a mem- 
ber of the Advisory Board and was elected trustee 
of -Swan Township in 1914. He entered upon his 
official duties in January, 1915, and his first term 
was of such constructive value and meant so much 
to the welfare of the local schools and other inter- 
ests entrusted to his charge he had the satisfaction 
of being returned to the office for another four 
year term on November 5, 1918. Mr. Simon looks 
after a good farm of 149 acres, is also a stock- 
holder in the Mutual Telephone Company, and is 



agent for the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company 
of Noble County. 

William A. Cochran. While his interests first 
and last have been chiefly identified with the great 
business of farming and stock raising, William A. 
Cochran's influence has gradually spread from his 
farm to include many important affairs in Ligonier 
and elsewhere, and in every sense he has been one 
of Noble county's foremost citizens in progressive- 
ness and public spirit. He is owner of one of the 
noted farms of the county, known as the Maple Row 
Stock and Dairy Farm, comprising 290 acres lo- 
cated on the Haw Patch and White Pigeon road 
two miles northeast of Ligonier. 

That farm is of the more interest to him because 
he was born there, August 9, 1857, son of Alfred 
and Cynthia (Hays) Cochran. His parents were 
both born in Perry County, Ohio, his mother being 
a daughter of John Hays. They were married in 
their native county, and soon afterward, in 1849, 
came to Indiana and located on the farm where 
their son now lives. Alfred Cochran at that time 
built a cabin and his industry gradually effected a 
number of improvements, some of which are in 
evidence today. He died on the old farm in 1883. 
He and his wife were active members of the 
Methodist Church and in politics he was a republi- 
can. Of their family of eight children four are 
still living: Mary E., widow of George W. Vedder ; 
Mahala, wife of A. J. Ramsbey ; Melissa, widow of 
John Denney ; and William A. 

William A. Corhran grew up on the home farm 
and had a common school education, being a grad- 
uate of the district schools. On March 7, 1678, he 
married Luella Hays, daughter of William D. and 
Harriett E. (Smith) Hays. Her father was a native 
of Ohio and her mother of Indiana. Her father 
at one time owned about 500 acres near Ligonier. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cochran ever since their marriage 
have lived on the Maple Row Stock and Dairy Farm. 
Mr. Cochran altogether owns about 800 acres around 
Ligonier and vicinity, his property being in three 
different farms, and he has 260 acres in Oklahoma 
near one of the most productive oil belts. He was 
one of the organizers of the Farmers Co-operative 
Elevator at Ligonier, was one of the stockholders 
in the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of 
Ligonier and is its vice president, and has been 
active in many community affairs. He gave much 
of his time to war auxiliary movements, serving as 
a member of the County Council of Defense, and 
was the first county chairman of the Y. M. C. A. 
in the state organization. He has served as town- 
ship chairman of Perry Township and is a republi- 
can, He and his family are members of the United 
Brethren Church at Ligonier, and he is one of the 
trustees and has been director of the choir of the 
church for the past forty years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cochran have three children. Edith, 
a graduate of the common schools, is the wife of 
C. R. Stage, of Perry Township. C. Deane, who 
attended school at Big Rapids. Michigan, married 
Eva Lance and lives at Ligonier. Florence Jessie 
is a graduate of the common schools, attended high 
school and is the wife of George Goshorn, living 
on the Maple Row Stock Farm with her father. 

Emmet B. Hagerty has spent his life in one of 
the best rural communities of LaGrange County, 
Van Buren Township, and for over thirty years he 
has served that community ably and well as a mer- 
chant. The firm Hagerty Brothers has been in busi- 
ness at Scott as general merchants since 1887. 

Mr. Hagerty, who was born in Van Buren Town- 



112 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



ship July 3, 1862, represents a pioneer family in 
Southern Michigan and Northern Indiana. His 
grandfather, Patrick H. Hagerty, was a native of 
Ireland and brought his family to America in 1819. 
He lived for a time in New York and later at New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, where he spent the rest of 
his life. For many years he was a faithful employe 
of old Commodore Vanderbilt, founder of the great 
Vanderbilt fortunes. Patrick H. Hagerty by his 
first wife had four children, James, Michael, Mary 
and Sarah, and by a second marriage had a son, 
George. 

James Hagerty, father of the Van Buren Town- 
ship merchant, was born in Donegal, Ireland, August 
I, 1816, and was three years old when brought to 
this country. He spent his boyhood days in New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, and when General Lafayette 
was on his last tour of America this boy had the 
honor of handing the great Frenchman a drink of 
water at New Brunswick. In 1834 he sought new 
opportunities in the new country of the middle west 
and settled in White Pigeon Township of St. Joseph 
County, Michigan. White Pigeon was then one of 
the principal towns in Southern Michigan. He ac- 
quired 160 acres of Government land, but after three 
years traded his land for a half interest in a grist 
mill at Scott. Indiana. He lived there the rest of 
his life, devoting much of his time to farming. For 
twelve years he was a justice of the peace. James 
Hagerty died in October, 1890. He married for 
his first wife Clarissa Munger, who died leaving one 
child, James E. For his second wife he married 
Amanda Bond, a native of Montour County, Penn- 
sylvania. She was the mother of Charles B., I. 
Adella, who married Chauncey Troyer and lives in 
Duluth, Minnesota; and Emmet B. 

Emmet B. Hagerty attended the Scott schools in 
Van Buren Township, and had a thorough business 
training, at first for eight years in a general store 
at Scott. In 1884 he and Charles Munger bought 
the business, and in 1887 Munger sold his interest to 
Charles Hagerty, thus establishing the firm of 
Hagerty Brothers. The brothers rebuilt their store 
building in 1894, and conduct one of the best gen- 
eral merchandise establishments in the county. In 
1902 the brothers also acquired the Junod farm in 
section 26 of Van Buren Township, and its manage- 
ment is another of their responsibilities. Emmet 
Hagerty is also vice president of the Farmers State 
Bank of Shipshewana and has been a director of 
that institution since it was organized. He is achar- 
ter member of the Odd Fellows Lodge at Shipshe- 
wana, and he and his wife are active members of 
the Scott Methodist Church, which he serves as trus- 
tee and steward. Mr. Hagerty married Ida J. Walter 
January i, 1892. She is a daughter of George and 
Catherine (Bickel) Walter. 

Shkrman C. Bakkr. One of the oldest and best 
known families of Washington Township of Noble 
County is that of Baker, and one of its representa- 
tives is Sherman C. a progressive and successful 
farmer who has devoted the best part of his life 
to agriculture and has realized all the profits of 
experience and enterprise in that field. 

He was born at Cromwell, Indiana, June 30, 1871, 
son of Jacob and Mary A. (Smith) Baker, both 
natives of Ohio. His mother came to Cromwell 
when she was a girl, grew up and married Jacob 
Baker, who owned a farm comprising a portion of 
the land on which the Village of Cromwell stands. 
Later he sold that property and bought 160 acres 
in Washington Township, where he continued the 
pursuit of agriculture until his death. His widow 



is still living. Jacob Baker was quite prominent in 
local affairs, served three terms as trustee of Sparta 
Township, and was active in republican politics. 
Of seven children five are still living: George W., 
a farmer in Kosciusko County ; Henry, of Denver, 
Colorado; Lewis, of Washington Township; Julia, 
wife of Rev. W. H. Budelmyre, of Indianapolis; 
and Sherman C. 

Sherman C. Baker was about four years old 
when his parents came to Washington Township, 
and during his boyhood he attended the local schools 
and acquired a practical knowledge of the business 
which fie has followed since early manhood. Mr. 
Baker owns a farm of sixty acres, devoted to gen- 
eral crops and livestock. 

January 21, 1892, he married Lusina Burnheimer, 
who was born in Whitley County, Indiana, De- 
cember I, 1869, daughter of Aaron and Julia 
(Welker) Burnheimer. Her father was born in 
Stark County, Ohio, in 1842 and died in 1917. Her 
mother was born in 1847. Mrs. Baker spent her 
early girlhood in Whitley County, and was educated 
in the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have 
two daughters : Bernice M., a high school graduate 
and wife of Leonard Van Vorest, of Kimmell ; and 
Mildred I., who besides completing the high school 
course attended the Tri-State Normal at Angola 
and is now one of the successful teachers of the 
schools of Washington Township. Mr. Baker is 
a republican and is affiliated with the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles in Columbia City. 

Jf.sse Warner is one of the enviable citizens of 
Noble County, possessor of an ample farm, and 
has regulated his life and affairs in conformity with 
the best standards of citizenship. 

The farm where he now lives was the scene of 
his birth on October 8, 1856. It is one of the oldest 
farms in one continuous ownership in Noble County. 
The Warner family in pioneer times moved West 
from New York State to Michigan, and later came 
to Indiana. They journeyed up the Maumee River 
on a boat which was urged against the sluggish 
current by poles, and after landing they made their 
way to Fort Wayne on horseback. They reached 
Fort Wayne in 1836. when there were only a few 
buildings in the city. The grandfather for a time 
worked in an old tavern at Fort Wayne and later 
moved to Noble County, locating near where Jesse 
Warner now lives. He built a little shack in the 
woods, and the grandparents spent the rest of their 
days in Swan Township. 

Jesse Warner is a son of Corodon and Lydia 
(Simon) Warner. His father was a native of 
Genesee County, New York, and his mother of Ohio. 
His father spent all his life on the old farm in 
Noble County. He and his wife were members of 
the Lutheran Church and he was a republican. Of 
eight children only two are now living, Jesse and 
Losina. The latter is the wife of Dr. William Adair, 
of Idaho. 

Jesse Warner grew up on the old farm, attended 
the common schools, and for thirty-five years or 
more has industriously cultivated and managed the 
land which was his father's before him. He has 130 
acres in one body and strictly as a farmer he has 
provided liberally for all the needs of his family. 

April 4, 1881, he married Sarah Gillet. They are 
the parents of the following children : Floyd, a 
graduate of the high school and of the Huntington 
Business College, formerly an employe of the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad and now at home ; Odeyne, a 
graduate of Ferris Institute and a teacher ; Jessie, a 
graduate of the Laotto High School and also a 
teacher ; and Fern, who is a teacher. Mrs. Warner 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



113 



was also engaged in educational work before her 
marriage. They are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and in politics Mr. Warner is a 
republican. 

J. How.^RD Moore. For over half a century J. 
Howard Moore has lived in Swan Township and 
Noble County, and his record throughout has been 
that of a trustworthy and efficient citizen, a good 
farmer, and a man whose life is open to inspection 
on every page. 

He was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 
November 20, 1853, son of Joseph P. and Mary 
(Bigger) Moore, the former a native of Washing- 
ton County. Pennsylvania, and the latter of Beaver 
County in the same state. Joseph P. Moore was a 
highly educated man and a minister and teacher for 
many years. He graduaftd from old Washington 
College in Pennsylvania, taught in private schools 
and later founded the East Liberty Collegiate In- 
stitute, of which he was the head for about twenty- 
five years. He brought his family to Indiana in the 
spring of 1865 and settled in Swan Township of 
Noble County. The journey was made by wagons 
from Fort Wayne. Joseph P. Moore was an or- 
dained minister of the Presbyterian Church, and 
preached at Albion and Avilla among other charges 
in Northeast Indiana. He was a republican in poli- 
tics. Of their six children three are still living: 
Mary E.. wife of Thomas Anderson; J. Howard; 
and William C. whose home is in Missouri. 

J. Howard Moore was' twelve years old when his 
parents came to Indiana, and besides a common 
school education he acquired much knowledge under 
the immediate direction of his father. On October 
12. 1876, Mr. Moore married Osie May Mendenhall. 
She was born in Swan Township of Noble County 
and from the common schools entered the Method- 
ist College at Fort Wayne, where she took the lit- 
erary and musical course. Being gifted musically 
she taught that art for some years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore had three children. Lillian is a graduate 
of high school and the wife of Charles Hosier, liv- 
ing near Laotto. John P., also a graduate of the 
common schools, married Grace Bradley and has 
four children, Arthur R., born in 1905 ; Reuel and 
Ruth, twins, born October 25, 1910; and Leah May, 
born October 25, 1918. The youngest child of Mr. 
and Mrs. Moore was Fiannai, or Fannie, who died 
aged twenty-one years. Mr. Moore lost his noble 
wife November 30, 1899. 

Mr. Moore is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, 
is an active republican, and has served as party 
committeeman. For one term he was trustee of 
Swan Township, and gave a faithful administration 
of the affairs of that office. As a farmer he occupies 
the old home estate of his father, containing ninety- 
four acres, and through agriculture has made ample 
provision for his family and home. 

Charles A. Campbell. With the exception of 
seven years when he kept a lonely bachelor's cabin 
on the prairies of North Dakota, Charles A. Camp- 
bell has lived in Smithfield Township of DeKalb 
County all his life. He has been an industrious 
farmer, has made his work practical, and while look- 
ing after his own affairs he has not neglected the 
interests of the community. In every sense he has 
been a useful citizen. He was born on the farm that 
he now owns September 3, 1866, a son of John and 
Cornelia (Hemstreet) Campbell. These were pioneer 
families, the Hemstreets coming to DeKalb County 
in 1843 and the Campbells in 1847, both settling in 
Smithfield Township. John Campbell was born in 
Summit County, Ohio, November 14, 1835, and his 



wife in Huron County, that state, October 21, 1838. 
They were married in Smithfield Township in 1859, 
and then settled on the farm where their son Charles 
lives, and spent the rest of their days there. The 
father died March 2, 1904. John Campbell was a 
republican, but subsequently became affiliated with 
the democratic party. He served a term as trustee 
of Smithfield Township. He and his wife had four 
children : Jennie, wife of Carey Duncan, of Eastern 
Ohio; Sarah, wife of George Parnell, of North 
Carolina; Scott, of Montpelier, Ohio; and Charles A. 

Charles A. Campbell grew up on the home farm 
and attended common schools. At the age of 
twenty-one he went west and homesteaded 160 acres 
in North Dakota, proving up on his claim and cul- 
tivating it for seven years. In 1895 he returned to 
DeKalb County and in 1898 married Sophia 
Schweitzer, who was born in Smithfield Township 
October i, 1876, and had a common school educa- 
tion. Since their marriage, for over twenty years, 
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have occupied the old Camp- 
bell homestead, where he owns 102 acres devoted to 
general farming and stock raising. He is active in 
democratic politics, a member of the township ad- 
visory board, a member of the Ashley Co-operative 
Association and a stockholder in the Gleaner Clear- 
ance House. He and his wife are both members of 
the Ancient Order of Gleaners. During the World 
war Mr. Campbell served as township chairman for 
the Council of Defense and was active in all 
patriotic campaigns. 

To his marriage were born six children: Josh J., 
Herman, Ruth, John, June and Helen. Herman and 
John are deceased. The others are all at home, and 
Josh and Ruth are graduates of the common schools. 

C. P. Baker, whose home is in section 21 of 
Sparta Township, Noble County, presents a good 
example of the man who has made a striking suc- 
cess from humble beginnings and against heavy 
odds. He was very young when his father died, 
was the only son in the family, and at a time when 
most boys are in school had to assume the burdens 
and heavy work of the farm. He started life after 
reaching his majority and after his marriage with 
very limited capital, and yet today he is one of the 
largest land owners, one of the most successful 
stock breeders, and one of the most liberal and 
public-spirited citizens in the county. 

He was born in Champaign County, Ohio, August 
I, 1847, a son of Samuel and Nancy (Woods) 
Baker, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 
of Virginia. They were married in Ohio, and in 
1850 settled in Turkey Creek Township of Kos- 
ciusko County, Indiana, where they spent the rest 
of their lives. The parents were zealous members 
of the Church of God. Samuel Baker was a re- 
publican in politics. They had six children, and all 
five of the daughters at one time or another taught 
school. The four children still living are: Anna, 
wife of Newton Rerrick, of Sparta Township; 
Josephine, wife of Milton Woods, of Kosciusko 
County; Paulina, wife of Augusta Roach, of Burton 
Township ; and C. P. Baker. 

C. P. Baker was only three years old when his 
parents moved to Kosciusko County, and he re- 
ceived all his schooling in that locality. He was 
still a small boy when his father died, and he then 
took charge of the farm and lived there until he 
was about twenty-six years of age. 

In February, 1872, he married Catherine Cole, of 
Noble County, Indiana. After their marriage they 
lived for a couple of years on the old farm, and 
then came to Noble County and bought sixty acres, 
which is included in the present extensive estate 



114 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



of Mr. Baker. He added other lands from time 
to time and now owns 310 acres, which of itself is 
a good indication of what he has done with his 
time and opportunities. Much of his success has 
come from his ability in raising and handling live- 
stock. He has always kept good horses, and has 
been an extensive breeder of Shorthorn cattle. His 
herd was headed by White Hall Sutton. He has 
also been a breeder of the big type Poland China 
hogs, his hogs being headed by Buster Wonderer. 

Mr. Baker was the first president of the Sparta 
State Bank at Cromwell. He has taken an intelli- 
gent interest in local affairs, and was elected and 
served a term of six years as trustee of Sparta 
Township. He is a republican in politics. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baker had three children, two of 
whom are still living, Gertrude and James Otis. 
Gertrude is a graduate of hig^ school and had a 
commercial course and is now the wife of Robert 
Bouse. They live on a farm in Washington Town- 
ship, and their daughter is the wife of Roy Hontz. 
Mr. Hontz is train dispatcher at Garrett, Indiana. 
James Otis Baker is a graduate of high school 
and married Mattie Cramer. Mr. and Mrs. Baker 
have one grandchild, Mabel Hontz. 

Philip M. Cause. One of the prosperous farm- 
ers and well known men of Noble County, whose 
valuable farm of 200 acres in Swan Townshijj repre- 
sents the toil and energies and savings of many 
years of his life, is Philip M. Cause, who was born 
in the township where he now lives, August 24, 1859. 

His parents were John C. and Anna M. (Beard) 
Cause. His father was born in Wuertemberg, Ger- 
many, December 20, 1815. In 1841 he came to the 
United States, being then twentv-six years of age. 
From New York City he went West to Ohio, lived 
in that state two years, and in 1843 arrived as a 
pioneer in Noble County. Here he bought land, 
which could scarcely be said to be improved, in sec- 
tion 34 of Swan Township. He was a man of great 
enterprise, and handled large affairs outside of his 
farming. He took a contract to build a section of 
the plank road through this part of Indiana. He 
also had a contract for construction work on the 
Eel River, and that nearly proved disastrous, since 
he lost most of his capital. Later he had a contract 
for building some miles of the Lake Shore Railway. 
After a varied fortune in this line of work he finally 
devoted all his energies to the farm and lived on his 
land in Noble County until 1864, when he went to 
Allen County and took charge of the Judge Hanna 
farm of 1,040 acres. He used that extensive prop- 
erty for raising sheep, and was engaged in a suc- 
cessful business there for sixteen years. He then 
returned to Noble County and died here honored 
and respected and in advance age May 2, 1902. He 
was a member of the Lutheran Church and was very 
active in the democratic party. Of seven children 
three died in infancy. Of those living John C. is a 
resident of Missouri; Maggie is the wife of David 
Wert, of Quincy, Indiana ; Katie is the widow of 
Joseph Peffer ; and Philip M. is the youngest. 

Philip M. Cause grew up on a farm and had a 
common school education. He was at home with his 
parents to the age of twenty-one. After that for 
two years he found employment in Fort Wayne and 
also spent nine months in Michigan. Eventually 
he rented the old farm of his father and finally 
had progressed far enough to purchase the land out- 
right. He has continued its successful manager for 
many years. One specialty of the Gause farm is 
pure bred Duroc hogs. 

October 24, 1884, Mr. Gause married Miss Mary 
J. Fogle. She was born in Allen County, Indiana, 



August 14, 1861, and was reared and educated there. 
Seven children have been born to their marriage : 
Floyd, a graduate of high school, who also attended 
college, has been a successful banker, was first presi- 
dent and for three years has been cashier of the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank, and was also for a 
time an employe of the Fort Wayne postoffice ; Anna 
is the wife of Clarence Freeman; Ora P. married 
Arthur Potter; John is a farmer at home; Trude 
is the wife of Merle Gump ; Pearl is married and 
lives at home ; George, the youngest of the family, 
wears the uniform and has seen service with the 
American Expeditionary Forces in France. 

Mr. Gause has been a liberal supporter of church 
and allied causes. He is affiliated with Huntertown 
Lodge No. 689, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
and has attained the thirty-second degree, Scottish 
Rite, in the Fort Wayne Consistory. Politically a 
democrat, he has aided his party and has been a live 
and public spirited factor in his own community. 

Charles Weller. "The Fairview Farm," which 
speaks for itself among the pleasant attributes of 
Swan Township, Noble County, is owned by Charles 
Weller in section I, comprising 120 acres. Mr. 
Weller is a very particular and careful agriculturist, 
and combines just the right amount of science with 
good practice, so that his ledger has always shown 
a comfortable balance on the credit side. 

Mr. Weller was born in Butler Township, of De- 
Kalb County, Indiana, November 24, 1869, son of 
Philip and Elizabeth (Rakestraw) Weller. His 
parents were both natives of Ohio, his father of 
Clark County and his mother of Greene County. 
After their marriage in Ohio they moved to In- 
diana about i860 and settled in DeKalb County, 
but in 1871 moved to section i of Swan Township 
in Noble County, and lived there the rest of their 
lives. They were members of the Methodist Prot- 
estant Church and in politics the father was a re- 
publican. Of eleven children six are still living: 
Martha, wife of Levi Treesh, of DeKalb County; 
Joseph, a farmer in DeKalb County; Oliver and 
Olive, twins, the former a resident of Ligonier, and 
the latter the wife of Henry L. Houser of DeKalb 
County; Emma, wife of David Heitz, of DeKalb 
County ; and Charles. 

Charles Weller grew up on the old farm in Swan 
Township and had a district school education. Since 
the age of twenty-one he has been making his own 
way in the world. He married Ida L. Henry. She 
was born in Noble County, on the farm where she 
and her husband now reside. Her birth occurred 
July 12, 1870, and she received her education in the 
district schools. For three or four years after their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Weller lived in DeKalb 
County and then returned to Noble County and 
bought their present home. They have two chil- 
dren : Gertrude is a graduate of the .\villa High 
School and is the wife of Freeman Kelham, living 
in DeKalb County. Gladys is a graduate of the 
common schools and of the high school. Mr. and 
Mrs. Weller are members of the Methodist Prot- 
estant Church and he is one of the church trustees. 
He is a past master of Avilla Lodge No. 460, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, and in politics is 
a republican. 

Harvey E. Musser has been a resident of DeKalb 
County since early infancy, and during his mature 
career of thirty years has been a member of the 
farming community of Franklin Township. He 
owns a farm of eighty acres in section 5 of that 
township. 

Mr. Musser was born in Stark County, Ohio, Feb- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIAXA 



115 



ruary _'3, 1863, a son of William and Catherine 
(Yutzler) Musser. Her father was a native of 
Pennsylvania. The mother was born in Switzerland 
and was fourteen years of age when she came with 
her parents to the United States. She grew up in 
Ohio and was married in Stark County. In 1865 
the Musser family came to DeKalb County, Indiana, 
Harvey E. being then about two years old. 

He was the oldest of seven children, and as a boy 
he attended the common school and acquired an 
education sufficient for his needs. He is a member 
of Hamilton Lodge of Masons, also belongs to the 
Hamilton Grange and in politics is a democrat. He 
and his wife are members of the Eastern Star. 

December 29, 1883, he married Ida Hamman. They 
have five children: Effie, wife of Ozro Richey; 
Sherman, who lives in DeKalb County, near Hamil- 
ton; Ethel, wife of Leroy Hodges; Edna, wife of 
Err Lemon ; and Floyd, who married Laura Kaufl- 
man. 

Mrs. Musser is a daughter of Adam and Rebecca 
(Curry) Hamman. Her father was born in Stark 
County, Ohio, May 12, 1838, and her mother in Co- 
lumbiana County, that state, in March 1842. In the 
Hamman family were eleven children, and those liv- 
ing today are; Ida; Lydia, wife of Benjamin Dun- 
can ; Jesse, of Williams County, Ohio ; Cora, wife 
of John Rohrbaugh; Rebecca, wife of William May; 
and Miles, of Pleasant Lake Indiana. The Ham- 
man family settled in DeKalb County in 1854. Mrs. 
Musser was reared in Franklin Township and at- 
tended the public schools there. 

Elbridge E. Butler has spent nearly all his active 
years as a farmer in Salem Township of Steuben 
County. He was born there, grandson of one of 
the earliest settlers, and his own life has been in 
keeping with the high standards of industrious and 
good citizenship set by the earlier representatives 
of the name. 

Mr. Butler was born in Salem Township Septem- 
ber 16, 1865. His grandfather was Jesse Butler, 
' representing an old Vermont family. In June, 1838, 
Jesse and his brothers Loren and Daniel with their 
families started for Steuben County, Indiana. There 
were of course no railroads, and they made the 
journey by the feasible routes then in existence. 
They first proceeded to .'Mbany, New York, crossed 
New York State on the Erie Canal, from Buffalo 
went by lake boat to Toledo, and near Toledo 
bought the teams and wagons which brought them 
to Salem Township in Steuben County. The three 
brothers bought 500 acres in sections 5 and 8, 
and they not only improved their lands from the 
wilderness into good farms, but were men of promi- 
nence in every way. The children of Jesse Butler 
were Seymour, Mary Jane, who became the wife 
of Newton Bodlie, Parthena and James W. 

James W. Butler, father of Elbridge E., was born 
in Salem Township .April 2^. 1841, and died May 13, 
1895. He married Elnora Wright. Slie was also a 
native of Salem Township, daughter of Elbridge 
and Martha (Cochran") Wright. Elbridge Wright 
was one of the earh- farmers of Salem Township. 
His children were Elnora, Henry, Cyrus, Monroe 
and Marion, twins, Elsie, who became the wife of 
Frank Gettings, and Dora, who married John 
Tritch. 

_ James W. Butler received a public school educa- 
tion in Salem Township, also attended the academy 
at Orland, and from early manhood devoted himself 
to farming in his native township. He owned the 
l6o-acre homestead of his father and lived there 
until his death. But besides looking closely after 



the management of this farm ho became noted as 
probably the most successful stock buyer in this 
part of Indiana. His wife died May 27, 1885, the 
mother of four children: Elbridge E. ; May, who 
became the wife of Benjamin Hayward; Cora, who 
died at the age of thirteen; and Lura, wife of 
Edward Bussell. 

Elbridge E. Butler attended the Butler School in 
Salem Township, and with the exception of two 
years when he was managing a livery business at 
Kendallville has devoted his energies to farming in 
his native township. In 1900 he bought his present 
farm in sections 4 and 9, and has 160 acres 
well fitted for staple crops and livestock. He is a 
breeder of Jersey cattle and as a farmer knows his 
business thoroughly. 

October 2, 1880, Mr. Butler married Elizabeth 
Emerson, a native of Salem Township and daughter 
of Avery and Elizabeth (Parsell) Emerson. The 
Emersons are a well known Steuben County family. 
Mrs. Butler is a sister of Fred Emerson of ,\ngola. 
To their marriage were born four children : Monroe, 
who married Irene DeLong and has two children, 
Ruth and Jean; George Clifford who married 
Margaret Emerson: James A., who died in child- 
hood; and John Elbridge. Mr. and Mrs. Butler 
also took into their home Cora Barkley at the age 
of seven vears, and she has lived with them for the 
past fifteen years. Mr. Butler is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

J.\MES T. Ini;N. One of the farms longest occu- 
pied in Spart.-i Township is that of James T. Iden 
in section 25. Mr. Iden and wife have lived in that 
locality of Noble County nearly forty years, have 
cultivated innumerable crops, and have seen their 
efforts grow and prosper under their hand. In every 
sense of the word they are substantial citizens, 
good neighbors and upholders of the best com- 
munity spirit. 

Mr. Iden was born in Licking County, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 4, 1854, a son of Samuel and Julia A. 
(Hull) Iden, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Ohio. They were married in 
Ohio, and after some years of residence in Licking 
County moved to Noble County, Indiana, in 1864, 
settling near Indian Village in Sparta Township. 
The parents spent the rest of their days there, and 
Samuel Iden had a farm of 120 acres. He was a 
very active member of the Baptist Church and in 
politics a democrat. There were five children, and 
the three now living are: James T. ; Alpheus J., 
a resident of LaMesa, California; and Sarah E., 
unmarried. 

James T. Iden was ten years old when he came 
to Noble County. He had attended school back in 
Ohio and finished his education in the district 
schools of this county. After reaching the age of 
twenty-one he worked out by the month, and on 
April 17, 1881, married Anna S. Schlabach. She 
was born in Stark County, Ohio, November 9, 1859, 
and was only an infant when her parents came to 
Noble County. She was educated in this county in 
the common schools. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Iden located on the farm where they have 
lived ever since. They have 100 acres of land 
devoted to general farming and stock raising. Mr. 
Iden is a democrat in politics. He and his wife 
liave no children. 

William M. Schlabach, father of Mrs. Iden, was 
born in Pennsylvania. He went from that state 
to Ohio and married there Sarah Braucher. For 
many years they were farmers in Ohio, but in the 
spring of i860 came to Noble Count.v, Indiana, and 
located in Sparta Township, where they spent the 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



re?.t of their lives and became well known and 
highly respected people of that community. Mrs. 
Iden's mother died in July, 1880, and her father 
passed away February 2, 1909. There were eight 
children in the Schlabach family, seven of whom 
are still living : Clara A., wife of Yangulph 
Werker ; John R., who lives near Cromwell ; Anna, 
Mrs. Iden ; William O., of South Bend; Mary E., 
wife of J. W. Smith, of Ligonier; M. Schlabach, 
of Fort Wayne ; Charles L., of Cromwell ; and Ida 
E., deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Schlabach were mem- 
bers of the Christian Church. 

Mrs. M.\Ry E. Thompson, widow of the late Elza 
J. Thompson, is a member of the well-known Pan- 
cake family of Noble County, and is daughter of the 
late John Pancake, one of the most prominent citi- 
zens of this section of Indiana. He first settled in 
Elkhart Township of Noble County. 

The late Elza J. Thompson was born three miles 
north of Albion in 1851, was educated in the dis- 
trict school and taught school, and on January 14, 
1886, married Mary E. Pancake. Mr. Thompson 
died fourteen years later. 

Mrs. Thompson has two children: Jennie E., 
born August 3, 1888, still living with her mother, 
and Forest P., who was born November 26, 1891. 
Mrs. Thompson has eighty acres in her home farm, 
160 acres in Elkhart Township, and she owns her 
father's old home of 160 acres. She is a depositor 
in the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company at 
Ligonier and a stockholder in the Topeka Bank. 

William O. Shambaugh has been an active man 
of affairs in Noble County for over forty years, and 
the greater part of this time has been devoted to 
the cultivation of his farm in Green Township. He 
owns one of the best homes and homesteads in that 
locality, and aside from his position as a successful 
farmer always carried much weight in public af- 
fairs. 

Mr. Shambaugh was born in Ashland County. 
Ohio, January 18, 1855, son of Henry and Margaret 
(McKinley) Shambaugh, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. His father 
went to Ohio when a boy, grew up and married 
there, and two years after his marriage moved to 
Wisconsin, where he bought a farm. When the 
Civil war came on he went into the ranks as a sol- 
dier and served faithfully and bravely until the 
close of hostilities. Having sold his property in 
Wisconsin he returned with his family to Ohio, and 
bought the old homestead in Ashland County. In 
1874 he moved to Noble County, Indiana, and lived 
the rest of his life in Green Township. He was a 
democrat in politics. Of four children born to the 
parents three are still living: William O. ; Nancy, 
wife of Isaac Sharnbaugh, of Green Township; and 
Clara, wife of Lewis Sommers, of Green Township. 

William O. Shambaugh grew up on his father's 
farm in Ohio, had a common school education, and 
was a member of the home circle until the age of 
twenty-one. On September 14, 1876, he married 
Miss Fannie E. Arthur. She was born near Green 
Center in Noble County, February 14, 1857. Mr. 
and Mrs. Shambaugh have two children : Cora is 
a graduate of the common schools and the wife of 
Curtis Bonar now on Mr. Shambaugh's home farm ; 
Franklin is a graduate of the common schools, lives 
in Green Township and married Delia McCoy. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Shambaugh 
began farming in Green Township, and they now 
own a well cultivated and improved farm of 120 
acres. Mr. Shambaugh also has property at Churu- 
busco. He and his wife and family lived for two 



years at Kendallville. Mr. Shambaugh is one of 
the trustees of the parsonage of the United Brethren 
Church at Green Center, where he and his family 
worship. He has a record of efficient service as a 
trustee of Green Township, an ofiice he held from 
1900 to 1904. 

Charles H. Hoverstock, who is proprietor of the 
Hoverstock Garage at Topeka, has come into the 
automobile business by a natural process of evolu- 
tion, having .in early life been connected with the 
manufacture of bicycles, and when that vehicle was 
largely superseded by the automobile he became agent 
for one of the pioneer cars of America, and for 
over fourteen years has sold the famous Buick. 

He was born in Eden Township of LaGrange 
County November 18, 1875, son of James and L. 
(Parks) Hoverstock. His father was born in La- 
Grange County April 28, 1850, a son of William and 
Margaret Hoverstock, who came to this state from 
Ohio and settled near Topeka on a farm lying partly 
in Eden and partly in Clear Spring Township. James 
Hoverstock, who died April 15, 1913, was a promi- 
nent and wealthy business man, owning a livery 
establishment which he operated for many years, 
until he retired. He and his wife were active mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church and he was a repub- 
lican. 

Charles H. Hoverstock, only son of his parents, 
grew up on a farm and received most of his educa- 
tion in the schools of Ligonier. For several years 
he was a foreman in a bicycle factory and in an as- 
sembly department at New Castle and Hartford 
City, Indiana. Fourteen years ago he took the local 
agency for the Buick automobile, and handles in ad- 
dition the Chevrolet car. He built his present com- 
modious garage in 1914. Mr. Hoverstock is a stock- 
holder in both banks in Topeka. 

In 1897 he married Alice Lantz, daughter of Ezra 
and Susanna (Yoder) Lantz. They have three chil- 
dren : Kenneth W., associated with his father in 
business; Caistro H., a student in high school; and 
Alice L., who is twelve years old and a student in 
the common schools. Mrs. Hoverstock is a member 
of the Baptist Church. He is a republican and is 
affiliated wth the Modern Woodmen of Amerca. 

Albert L. Addis. One of the most interesting 
citizens of Noble County is Albert L. Addis, who 
owns the Arrowdale Stock Farm in section 14 of 
Noble Township. Mr. Addis is not only a capable 
farmer and an equally capable citizen, but is a man 
of scholarly tastes and pursuits and is probably the 
highest local authority on all subjects pertaining 
to archeology in Noble County. Much of his work 
has received official recognition from the foremost 
scholars and from the Government at Washington. 

Mr. Addis was born on the farm where he now 
resides March 6, 1878, son of Milton and Mary 
(Kneener) Addis. His father was born in Monroe 
County, Ohio, May 2, 1838, a son of John Addis, 
who brought his family to Noble County in early 
days and spent the rest of his life here. Milton 
Addis was a young man when he came to the county, 
was married here, his wife coming from Darke 
County, Ohio, and he then bought the 115 acres 
where his son is now living. He was a soldier in the 
Civil war, and while in the army lost his hearing. 

Albert L. Addis was the only child of his parents, 
both of whom are now deceased. All his life has 
been spent on the home farm. He acquired a com- 
mon school education, and has made use of oppor- 
tunity since leaving school to extend his studies 
and investigations in various channels, particularly 
in tracing and investigating the remains of 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



117 



aboriginal inhabitants in tlii? section of Indiana. 
After the death of his father he took charge of 
the l.onie farm, and on April 14, 1897, he married 
Mary M. Huff. She was born in Greene Township 
of Noble County January 27, 1881, daughter of 
Christ and Nancy J. Simmons Huff. Her father 
was born in Swan Township of Noble County June 
18, 1843, and her mother in Darke County, Ohio, 
September 7, 1855. Mrs. Addis was reared in 
Greene Township. They have four children : Edna, 
Artie and Lawrence, who have all finished the work 
of the common schools, and Mabel, who is now in 
the seventh grade. Mrs. Addis is a member of the 
Baptist Church at Wolf Lake, and has been affiliated 
with that organization since 1907. Mr. Addis is a 
democrat. 

It was about 1899 that Mr. Addis formally under- 
took the collection of specimens that would serve 
as a systematic evidence of the early occupation 
of aboriginal tribes in his section of Indiana. Later 
he sold this collection to a museum of American 
Indians in New York City. He was paid $3,000 
for his collection in 1915. At the present time Mr. 
Addis is busily engaged in acquiring another col- 
lection. He also contributed for Noble County the 
account of aboriginal remains published by the 
Bureau of Ethnology. 

Edmon F. Smith. One of the excellent farmers 
and cattle feeders of Steuben Township, Steuben 
County, is Edmon F. Smith, owner of 120 acres of 
as good land as can be found in this part of the 
state. He was born on his present farm in section 
20. Steuben Township, November 7. i860, a son of 
Amos Smith and grandson of Michael Smith, a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, who became one of the pio- 
neers of Smithfield Township, DeKalb County, 
Indiana. A few years after locating in that town- 
ship he came to Steuben Township, where he lived 
the remainder of his life. He married Elizabeth 
Fox, and they had the following children: Jacob, 
Amos, Emeline. who married John Fish, and Ada- 
line, who married Frank Slayball. 

Amos Smith was born in Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, and his wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Elizabeth Wolfgang, was born in Pennsylvania, 
she being a daughter of Samuel Wolfgang. Coming 
to Steuben Township with his father, Amos Smith 
became the owner of 200 acres of land in Steuben 
Township, a portion of which is now owned by his 
son E. F. Smith. He and his wife had the follow- 
ing children : Sarah, who married Charles E. Shu- 
man ; Edmon F., whose name heads this review ; and 
Delia, who married Henry Mountz. Amos Smith 
became well known in his community as a man of 
sterling character and unquestioned integrity, and 
his verbal promise was considered as good as an- 
other man's bond. 

Edmon F. Smith attended the district schools of 
Steuben Township, and was taught to be a farmer 
by his experienced father. After attaining his ma- 
jority he began farming the homestead on his own 
account, and has owned it since 1893. the farm com- 
prising 120 acres. Here he carries on general farm- 
ing and breeds Shorthorn cattle, his methods of do- 
ing his work being such as to win for him the com- 
mendation of his neighbors. In 1895 he erected his 
present comfortable modern residence, and has re- 
modeled the other buildings so that his premises 
present a neat and attractive appearance and show 
that the owner understands his business. 

On September 22, 1885, Mr. Smith was united 
in marriage with Enola I. Weldin, born October 22, 
1864, in Jackson Township, DeKalb County, Indiana, 
a daughter of Leander F. Weldin and his wife, 



Rebecca J. (Moore) Weldin. Leander F. Weldin 
was born in Columbiana County, Ohio. When the 
Civil war broke out he naturally espoused the cause 
of the North, and in August, 1861, gave proof of 
this in his enlistment as a member of the Thirtieth 
Indiana Infantry, in which he served for four years 
and three months and participated in the following 
battles : Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, Rocky 
Face Ridge, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, 
Lovejoy's Station, Franklin and Nashville. After he 
received his honorable discharge he located in Steu- 
ben Township, where he continued to farm the re- 
mainder of his life. He and his wife had the fol- 
lowing children : Enola, Kimber M., Delbert G. and 
Arthur L. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two children, 
namely: Velma E. and Waldo E. Waldo married 
Leafa Kohl and they have a daughter, Ruth De 
Vere, and a son, Warren Kohl. Like his father, 
Mr. Smith stands deservedly high in his community, 
and he and his wife entertain their friends at their 
comfortable home upon many occasions, for they 
delight in gathering about them those to whom they 
are bound by ties of affectionate regard. 

Joseph S. Watson is one of the well known and 
well-to-do farmer citizens of York Township, Noble. 
County, and has come into his present prosperity by 
relying entirely upon his own good sense and hard 
efforts since assuming life's serious responsibilities 
for himself. His home is four miles southwest of 
Albion. 

Mr. Watson was born in DeKalb County, Indiana, 
June 19, 1866, a son of Robert and Electra (Wells) 
Watson. His father was born in Medina County, 
Ohio, and his mother in Clark County of the same 
state. Their respective families came to Indiana at 
an early day, locating in Allen County, where Robert 
and Electa grew up and married. They lived on 
farms in different counties of Indiana and for 
eleven years were residents of the State of Tennes- 
see. Robert Watson was a prominent member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church and was a stanch 
republican in politics. Of their seven children six 
are still living; Milton C, of Fort Wayne; Elvira 
E., wife of M. V. Hall; Hans A.; Theresa, wife of 
John App; Joseph S. ; and Viola, wife of Nelson 
Curtis. 

Joseph S. Watson grew up on a farm and at- 
tended the district schools. At the age of twenty- 
one he started out to earn his own way in the world. 
For one winter he was a cattle feeder, and the fifty 
dollars he saved from that work he invested in two 
head of cattle and later he bought a farm in Jasper 
County, Indiana, and traded that for land in Ten- 
nessee, where he lived for four and a half years. 
On returning to Indiana he acquired eighty acres 
in Allen County, and he was a farmer in that locality 
for twelve years. Since then he has extended his 
efforts as a farmer and business man in Noble 
County, and now has a well modeled farm of 160 
acres. He does general farming and stock raising. 

Mr. Watson married in 1893 Dora Stephen.son, 
of Allen County, Indiana, but a native of Paulding 
County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Watson are the parents 
of six children. Goldie. who finished her education 
in the college at Fort Wayne, is now general clerk 
with the firm of Ackerman & Hardenbrook. Etha 
D. is a graduate of high school and of Manchester 
College, and also of the Indiana Business College at 
Fort Wayne, and is now connected with the Gen- 
eral Delivery Company at Fort Wayne. Alva N., 
Emerson, Alice and Cora May are the younger 
children, all at home. Mr. Watson is a republican 
in politics. 



118 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Charles E. Newcomer. In the same Townshp 
where he was born and reared, Frankhn Township, 
Charles E. Newcomer has spent his active life as 
a tiller of the soil, has gathered many crops through 
the consecutive seasons, and is directing a large and 
valuable farm in section 8, where he has his home 
and where his family of children are growing up 
around him. 

Mr. Newcomer was born in Franklin Townshp 
May 12, 1873, a son of George and Barbara (Van 
Horn) Newcomer, the former a native of Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, and the latter of Allen Town- 
ship, Noble County, Ohio. George Newcomer came 
to DeKalb County with his parents, grew up here 
and after his marriage settled in section 29 of 
Franklin Township. Some years ago he and his good 
wife retired from the farm and are now living at 
Waterloo. He is a democrat and is a member of the 
Masonic Order. Of the seven children six are still 
living: Charles E. ; Lona, unmarried; Mary M., 
widow of John Brown; Arnie, who occupies the old 
homestead; Elmer, also of Franklin Township; and 
William, of that Township. 

Charles E. Newcomer spent his boyhood days alter- 
nately attending school and working in the fields 
. and about the home. He married Effie Mann, a 
native of Franklin Township. They have a family of 
five children : Marion, born June 22, 1897 ; Harold, 
born January 16, 1900; Howard, born December 23, 
1901 ; Grace, born October 25, 1903 ; and Gladys, 
born November 30, 1907. The four older children are 
all graduates of the common school and all are still 
in the home circle. 

Mr. Newcomer is affiliated with Lodge No. 701, 
Free and Accepted Masons, Royal Arch Chapter No. 
106, Council No. 83, Royal and Select Masters, and 
he and his wife are members of the Eastern Star 
Chapter. He is a past grand of the Odd Fellows 
and a member of the Grand Lodge and is a past 
chief patriarch of the Encampment. :Mrs. New- 
comer is a past grand of the Rebekahs. Politically 
Mr. Newcomer affiliates with the democratic party. 
He is a member of the Hamilton Grange. His farm 
in Franklin Township comprises 200 acres and he 
has it well equipped and well stocked with good 
grades. 

Mrs. Newcomer was born in Franklin Township 
August 8, 1876, a daughter of Jahn and Elizabeth 
(Curry) Mann. Her father was born in Stark 
County, Ohio, in 1838, and came with his parents to 
Franklin Township in 1839. His wife was born in 
Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1840 and came to 
DeKalb County when a young lady. They were 
married March 24, 1864, then lived in Franklin Town- 
ship one year, spent a year in Missouri, and after 
that lived in Franklin Township the rest of their 
days. Mr. Mann was a democrat in politics. There 
were two children : Almeda, deceased wife of Adam 
Hamman, and Effie E., Mrs. Newcomer. 

Claude Kim m ell is a prominent representative 
of a numerous family of that name in Noble 
County, and for a number of years has been suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming and stock 
raising on a large place in Sparta Township. 

He was born in York Township of the same 
county June 24, 1879, son of Orlando and Jane 
(White) Kimniell. Claude was the youngest in a 
rather large family. He grew up on the old farm, 
attended district schools. He also for two years 
attended Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Michigan, and 
then took a business course at _ Indianapolis, In- 
diana. He lived at home until his marriage. 

In August, 1909, Miss Hannah Kiester became 



his wife. Mrs. Kimmell is a woman of thorough 
education and culture. She is a daughter of John 
and Barbara (Moore) Kiester. She was born and 
reared in Washington Township, attended the dis- 
trict schools there, is a graduate of the State 
Normal School and holds a life certificate as a 
teacher. She was a teacher both in the common 
and high schools before her marriage. They have 
two children: Anna May, born December 18, 1910, 
and Claude A., born August 14, 1917. In this large 
family of Kimmells in Noble County, Claude A. 
happens to be the only grandson bearing the name 
Kimmell. 

Mr. Kimmell is farming on an extensive scale, 
and has a total of 640 acres under his control and 
management. He breeds and raises all kinds of 
livestock. He is a stockholder in the State Bank 
at Kimmell, is a republican, and a member of Albion 
Lodge No. 97, Free and Accepted Masons. 

Ira L. Myers, proprietor of the Union Home 
Farm of 360 acres in Orange Township of Noble 
County, is a man of interesting characteristics and 
experience. He early trained himself for a career 
as a pharmacist, also studied medicine, but reasons 
of ill health brought him back to the farm where 
he was reared, and for a quarter of a century he 
has been one of the leading agriculturists of Noble 
County. Those familiar with Mr. Myers' operations 
say that his success is largely due to his good judg- 
ment and his willingness to take long chances, the 
same quality that makes successful business men as 
well as good farmers. 

Mr. Myers was born in Orange Township, March 
T5, 1871, a son of Reuben D. and Sarah (Kiefer) 
Myers, the former a native of Summit County, Ohio, 
and the latter of Pennsylvania. Reuben Myers 
moved to Indiana when a young man and settled in 
Noble County, and his wife's people also came to 
the same locality. After their marriage they settled 
on a farm in Orange Township, where the father 
lived until his death in 1912. The mother is still 
living. The family were members of the United 
Brethren Church at Oak Grove. The father was 
affiliated with the Masonic Lodge at Rome City, and 
in politics was a democrat. Of four children, three 
are still living: Melissa, wife of Emanuel Myers, of 
Elkhart, Indiana; Frank E., of Orange Township; 
and Ira L. 

Ira L. Myers spent his boyhood on the farm where 
he is now living, and acquired his early education 
at Rome City. He attended the high school there 
and entered the pharmacy department of North- 
western University of Chicago, graduating with the 
degree Ph. G. on February 25, 1890. In the fall of 
the same year he entered the medical department of 
Northwestern University and diligently pursued his 
studies for two years. 

Then, as above noted, he left school and aban- 
doned a professional career on account of ill health, 
and returning home engaged in farming. For sev- 
eral years he rented his father's place, and later 
began buying until he owns 360 acres. One of his 
main standbys as a farmer has been wheat, and he 
made money on that crop long before the era of 
hiifh prices and Government regulation. He also 
ke"eps his farm well stocked and it represents a large 
investment and is a business handled with every 
degree of efficiency. 

November 2, 189S, Mr. Myers married Lizzie 
Shaeffer. She was born in Orange Township, March 
23, 1875, and graduated from the Wolcottville High 
School in 1892. Mrs. Myers is a member of the 
Evangelical Church at Wolcottville. They have one 
son. Victor L., born January 11, 1908, and now in 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



119 



the sixth grade of the public schools. When this 
son was a year old the father invested for him 
eighteen dollars in three sheep. The sheep were 
kept as a nucleus of a steadily growing flock, and 
now at the age of nine years the son Victor has 
1S5 sheep and has $2,800.00 to his credit in cash 
securities. Mr. Myers is a democrat and has served 
as precinct committeeman of his party. 

Charles W. Warring for a number of years has 
been an active member of the farming community 
of Jackson Township in Steuben County, and has 
lived in that county since he was a child. 

He was born in Cayuga County, New York, Jan- 
uary 25, 1870, a son of William and Phoebe Ann 
(Brown) Warring. His mother was born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1845. William Warring was born in Ire- 
land, October 4, 1841, a son of William Warring, Sr. 
His mother died in Ireland and in 1845 William 
Warring, Sr., came to Canada with his son William 
and daughter Cassie. He died in Canada after his 
second marriage. William Warring, Jr., served an 
apprenticeship at the trade of spinner in a woolen mill 
and followed that trade for a number of years. He 
became head boss in the Hayden factory in Cayuga 
County, New York. He was married while living 
there and he and his brother-in-law, Charles Brown, 
bought eighty acres of land, but after a few years 
he sold his interest and returned to work in .the 
woolen mills. In 1876 he came to Steuben County 
with his family, buying eighty acres of timbered 
land without fences. He cleared up the place, built 
a good house, and became one of the substantial 
farmers of Jackson Township. He also owned an 
acre of ground and a house in Flint. He spent his 
last days with his son, Charles, and died August 24, 
1907. His first wife died March 30, 1884, the 
mother of three children, named Charles W., Robert 
J. and William, the last dying in infancy. Robert 
J. Warring was born January 4, 1878, and is a 
farmer in Jackson Township, where he has seventy 
acres and is a successful breeder of Duroc Jersey 
hogs. He married Geneva Ritter, and their four 
children are Raymond, Wayland, Wilma and Levi. 
William Warring married for his second wife Minna 
Williams, and she died in March, 1907. 

Charles W. Warring grew up on the old home- 
stead in Steuben County from the age of six, and 
besides the public schools took a commercial course 
in the Tri-State College at Angola. Today he owns 
the old homestead and has added forty-nine acres 
of the Cliarles Brown place and has it all well im- 
proved and as a stockman devotes particular atten- 
tion to the Spotted Poland China hogs. He is a 
democrat, and his father was of the same political 
faith until late in life. 

In 1891 Mr. Warring married Florence V. DeLong, 
a daughter of James DeLong, Three children were 
born to their marriage: Rose Anne, born January 
30, 1892, is a graduate of the Flint High School and 
the Tri-State College and is the wife of Ellis Call, 
by whom she had two children. Opal and Maynard, 
the latter dying at the age of six months. Roscoe 
Curtis Warring, born July 15, 1893, was educated 
in the Flint High School, took a commercial course 
in the Tri-State College, and as a farmer rents the 
John Parsell farm. He married Winifred Parsell, 
a dau,ehter of George Parsell of Jackson Township, 
and has one son, Ralph. William Charles Warring, 
the youngest of the family, was born March 2. 1899, 
graduated from the Flint High School, attended the 
International Business College at Fort Wayne, and 
is still at home. 

Mrs. Warring's father, James DeLong, was born in 
Ohio and married Polly Daily, a native of the same 
state. When a child he was taken to .\llen County, 



Indiana, by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George De- 
Long, who spent the rest of their years there and 
were buried in the Cedar Creek Cemetery. Polly 
Daily's parents, George and Julia Ann (Essig) 
Daily, were also early settlers in Allen County, 
where they spent the rest of tlicir lives. James 
DeLong had a public school education, and in early 
life went west to Colorado and took up a claim. 
Part of that land is now covered by Colorado City. 
His wife started west and got as far as Missouri, 
where he returned to join her and they came back 
and settled in DeKalb County, Indiana. Mr. DeLong 
enlisted while there in the Union army and served 
eighteen months. After the war he returned to 
DeKalb County and was a successful farmer, though 
he never owned any land. He refused to take any 
pension for his services as a soldier, but after his 
death his widow received back pension and with it 
bought seventy acres in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County. Mrs. Warring's father died in 
1877 aged forty-four. Her mother lived until 1906, 
when she was seventy years of age. Her children 
were George, Catherine (deceased), Sylvia, Curtis, 
William, Ira, Florence and Ada (deceased). James 
DeLong was a republican and he and his wife were 
members of the United Brethren Church. 

Curtis DeLong, a brother of Mrs. Warring, was 
born in DeKalb County, March 3, 1862, and has 
been a resident of Steuben County since 1891. He 
owns considerable land in that county, comprising 
200 acres in Jackson Township and other land else- 
where. He married in 1894 Miss Maud ^Mercer, of 
Steuben County, daughter of Wesley Mercer. They 
have three children: Mary, born in 1896, Marie, 
born in 1903, and Madge Mary, born in 1908. 

Burl Moughler. One of the best representatives 
of the younger generation of farmers in DeKalb 
County is Biirl Moughler of Troy Township. When 
he bought his present farm of 118 acres in 1907 he 
had only $525 cash. From the products of the 
fields and his livestock he paid for the 118 acres, 
and since then has bought 48 acres additional. He is 
a thoroughly efficient stockman and realizes the 
necessity of the best improvements and methods of 
handling land and stock. 

Mr. Moughler w^as born in Wilmington Township, 
DeKalb County, a mile and a quarter south and a 
half mile east of Butler, August 16, 1881. a son of 
John and Alice (Hendershot) Moughler. His father 
was born in Wayne County, Ohio, February 9, 1850, 
and his mother in Defiance County, Ohio, March 6, 
1857. Both are residents of Troy Township, where 
they located when their son Burl was three years 
old. The mother is a member of the United Breth- 
ren Church. The father is a democrat. They have 
two sons, Burl and Glenn, the latter a farmer in 
Wilmington Township. 

Burl Moughler acquired his education in the dis- 
trict schools and as a young man he rented a baleing 
outfit and for three years traveled about the different 
farms baling hay. (Dn December 19, 1903, he married 
Delia C. Riser, who was born in Troy Township 
August 5, 1885. For three years after their marriage 
they rented land in Stafford Township, and then 
with the limited capital above noted bought their 
present home. The additional forty acres was ac- 
quired in 1918. Mr. Moughler breeds good grades 
of livestock, and for several years has fed hogs and 
cattle on an extensive scale. His two sons arc en- 
thusiastic members of the Boys Pig Clubs, and were 
contestants in the pig feeding contest for the dis- 
tricts of Stafford, Troy, Wilmington and Franklin 
townships and were awarded the first prize of $20 
in gold. 



120 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mougler are: Olis 
L., born October 21, 1904; Ora Dale, born August 
12, 1906; Roy J., born December 23, 1912; and Helen, 
born February 27, 1915- The family are members 
of the United Brethren Church and Mr. Moughler 
is trustee of the parsonage and formerly superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school and active in all de- 
partments of the church. He is affiliated with Lodge 
No. 157 of the Knights of Pythias at Butler and is 
a member of the Modern Woodmen of America at 
Edgerton, Ohio. Politically he is a republican. 

Lewis T. Baker has for thirty years or more 
been identified with the farming activities of Noble 
County, and is owner of eighty acres in Washington 
Township. Mr. Baker has followed general farming 
but has also specialized to some extent as a breeder 
of Shorthorn cattle and of O. 1. C. hogs. 

He was born at Cromwell, Indiana, November 
14, 1861. His parents, Jacob and Mary A. (Smith) 
Baker, were both natives of Ohio and came to 
Noble County, Indiana, with their respective fami- 
lies. They grew up here, were married, and then 
located on a farm near Cromwell and subsequently 
moved to Sparta Township, where Jacob Baker 
lived as a practical agriculturist until he moved to 
Washington Township, where he died on the farm. 
His widow is still living. Both have been active 
members of the Methodist Church, and as a re- 
publican he gave three terms of excellent service 
as trustee of Sparta Township. Of the children 
five are still living: G. W. Baker, of Kosciusko 
Countv; H. E. Baker, of Denver, Colorado; Lewis 
T.; Julia, wife of Rev. W. H. Brightmire, of In- 
dianapolis; and Sherman C, of Washington Town- 
ship. 

Lewis T. Baker spent his boyhood days and 
acquired his education at Cromwell, but has been 
a resident of Washington Township since he was 
sixteen years old. In September, 1885, he married 
Frances' Palmer. She was born in Whitley County 
and was educated in the common schools. Mr. 
Baker had the misfortune to lose his wife by death 
in May, 1913. There were no children. He is 
affiliated with the Lodge of Odd Fellows at Etna 
and is a past master of that lodge and a member 
of the grand lodge. In politics he is a republican. 

Frank T. Knisely. Nearly seventy years ago the 
late John B. Knisely came to Steuben County and 
began the development of a farm in York Township 
which is now the property of Frank T. Knisely. The 
latter, long regarded as one of the most substan- 
tial citizens of Steuben County, is an adopted son 
of John B. Knisely. He was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, June 21, 1874, and at the age of two months 
was adopted by the Knisely family. 

The late John B. Knisely, who died November 26, 
1912, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, No- 
vember 27. 1830, a son of David and Sarah Knisely. 
David Knisely entered land in section 6 of York 
Township, Steuben County, when the land was first 
put on the market. John B. Knisely at the age of 
twenty-one came to Indiana to improve this land, 
and his prosperity eventually was measured by the 
ownership of 360 acres. David Knisely died in 
Ohio in 1877. 

May 22, 1853, John B. Knisely married Emma S. 
Johnston. She was born in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 
May 22, 1836, a daughter of Silas and Aseneth 
Johnston. John Knisely and wife had five children, 
including their adopted son Frank. The three to 
reach mature years were Letta E., wife of George 
Osfall, a farmer and merchant of York Township, 
and the mother of one child, Emma L. ; Frank T. ; 



and Nellie C, who married Charles Hershmiller and 
died in Massachusetts, October 31, 1909. 

Frank T. Knisely, who continues the Knisely name, 
acquired his education in the public schools of York 
Township and as a boy and young man worked on 
his father's place. For three or four years he lived 
on a nearby farm, but with that exception his labors 
have been devoted to the old Knisely homestead. 
He owns 395 acres in sections 6 and 7, and by his 
industry, good judgment and public spirit has proved 
worthy of his inheritance. With the exception of 
the house he has put practically all the buildinfs and 
other improvements on the land. Mr. Knisely is 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

In 1896 he married Kate McElroy, daughter of 
Robert and Alzina (Brooks) McElroy. The Mc- 
Elroys and Brooks are old families of Steuben 
County, and special reference to them is made on 
other pages. Mr. and Mrs. Kniselv have had six 
children. Vera, Burl, Neva, Orlo, Arlene and 
Dorothy, but Dorothy died in infancy. 

MiNARD F. Rose. A resident of Steuben County 
over three-quarters of a century, Minard F. Rose 
has some interesting recollections of the journey 
which brought the family to this county from North- 
ern Ohio. He has concerned himself during his 
active years with farming in York Township, long 
since acquired a competency from his efforts, and 
in his declining years has the satisfaction of seeing 
his own children and some of his grandchildren 
started and established in life on a self-respecting 
plane. 

Mr. Rose was born in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 
December 9, 1841, a son of Jacob O. and Mary A. 
(Comstock) Rose. His father was born in Rens- 
selaer County, New York, May 18, 1814, a son of 
Elias and Eva (Overrocker) Rose, natives of New 
York and of Dutch ancestry. The Rose family 
moved from New York and settled near Cleveland 
in 1835. On April 12, 1837, Jacob O. Rose married 
Mary A. Comstock, and she was born July 3, 1817, 
a daughter of Stephen and Charlotte (Fitch) Com- 
stock, natives of Connecticut. 

It was in 184s that Jacob O. Rose and family 
moved to Steuben County, settling in York Town- 
ship. They made the journey by wagon and team. 
Minard F. Rose was then four years old, but recalls 
some of the incidents of the journey. He remem- 
bers that his father brought five head of Devonshire 
cows and a Chester White hog, arid he recalls the 
difficulties of crossing the Swanee River. Just about 
that time Mr. Rose had his experience of the 
whooping cough. The family settled a mile and a 
half east of where Minard Rose now lives, on eighty 
acres of wild land. Jacob Rose eventually ac- 
quired 240 acres there, but after ten years sold and 
bought what is now the Robinson farm. He lived 
there another period of ten years and then went to 
Big Rapids, Michigan, where he died October 24, 
1883. His widow then returned to Steuben County 
and lived with her son, Minard, until her death. 
They had three children ; Elias Overrocker, Char- 
lotte, who died in infancy, and Minard F. 

Minard F. Rose grew up in York Township, and 
has lived there since he was four years old. He 
acquired a good education, attending the public 
schools and was also a student at Hillsdale College 
under President Fairfield. In his early life he also 
taught school in Williams County, Ohio, two miles 
east of Columbia. For two years he rented the old 
homestead and in the fall of 1863 moved to his 
present place, where he has 140 acres. The im- 
provements when he moved there consisted of a 




a.<M^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



121 



frame house, which was the second frame building 
erected in the township. Mr. Rose has since com- 
pletely clianged the aspect of things on the farm, 
clearing and improving and erecting substantial 
buildings. He and his son. Irwin, have long been 
associated in the management of the farm and for 
some years they were breeders of Shorthorn cattle. 
Mr. Rose was the first county assessor under a new 
law, being appointed by the Board of County Corn- 
missioners and later elected to that office. In poli- 
tics he is a republican and also served one term as 
township trustee. He is a member of the Christian 
Church at Metz, his father having been a member 
of the same denomination. 

October 6, 1862, Mr. Rose married Miss Ann Eliza 
Powers. She was the second white child born in 
York Township, born January 2, 1839, a daughter 
of Winn Powers, and member of the well known 
Powers family of Steuben County, including her 
brother, Riley Powers. Mrs. Rose, who is now de- 
ceased, was the mother of five children. Mary is 
the wife of Ed E. Mitchell, of Phoenix, Arizona, 
and her daughter, Maggie, is married to Walter E. 
Frazee, of Rushville, Indiana. Jay O., the second 
child, lives at Angola, and by his marriage to Edith 
Fay has two sons, Minard F., Jr., and John. J, O. 
Rose is a minister of the Christian Church, was 
pastor of churches at Fort Wayne, Kendallville, 
Bryan, Ohio, and many other places, and in later 
years has been instructor in Bible classes at the 
Tri-State College. William E. Rose, a resident of 
Chicago, married Lena Merrj-, and their children 
are Winn, Lois, Edith and Dorothy. Irwin F., who 
for a number of years has been associated with his 
father on the farm, married Alice Goodale, daughter 
of the late Dr. Charles W. Goodale of Metz, and to 
their union have been born seven children : Mil- 
dred, Margaret, Graydon, Helen, Catherine, Ruth 
and Gordon, all living except Ruth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rose lost one child, Ida, when she was two weeks 
old. 

IsA.^c A. Wkrt is proprietor of IT3 acres of 
the old Wert farm two and a half miles north and 
a mile and a half east of South Milford. This 
farm is chiefly known because of the 'saw mill 
industry which has been operated there by Isaac 
A. Wert and by his father before him for a long 
period of years, and has been the source of pro- 
duction of much of the lumber manufactured in 
that part of LaGrange County. 

Isaac A. Wert was born on his farm August 29, 
1858, a son of Daniel and Eliza (Miller) Wert. 
His father was a native of Stark County, Ohio, and 
his mother of Seneca County, and after their mar- 
riage they came to Indiana, about 185.^. In 1857 
Daniel Wert bought the saw mill in Milford Town- 
ship. The plant was originally constructed about 
1843, more than three quarters of a century ago. 
After buying the property Daniel Wert tore down 
the old plant and reconstructed a new and better 
one, and he continued its operations until the in- 
firmities of age prevented him from managing the 
business any longer, since which -time his son Isaac 
has been proprietor. The father died at the age 
of eighty-seven vears. 

Isaac A. Wert married in 1884 Ella Eiman. She 
is the mother of one son, Cyrus D., born in 1885, 
who is married and lives with his father. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wert after their marriage lived on a farm 
six years and then moved to the Mill Farm, where 
they have lived ever since. During the World war 
Mr. Wert operated his mill to its fullest capacity in 
order to supply government needs. He is a stock- 
holder in the Noble Truck Company at Kendall- 
ville and the Sterlite Sales Company at Auburn, 



Indiana. He is affiliated with South Milford Lodge 
No. 619, International Order of Foresters, and with 
the Encampment, and in politics is a democrat. 

Walter W. Mountz is one of the best known 
public men in the official life of DeKalb County, is 
clerk of the DeKalb County Circuit Court, and has 
been a leader in local affairs for a number of years. 

Though of an old family of Northeast Indiana, 
he was born at Overbrook in the State of Kansas 
July 10, 1886. He is a son of Francis and Delia 
(Smith) Mountz. His father was born near Pleas- 
ant Lake, Indiana, July 6, 1859, had a common school 
education, was married at Ashley, and after his 
marriage lived in Kansas six years. Returning to 
Indiana, he settled in DeKalb County, at Garrett, 
where for fourteen years he was proprietor of a 
retail hardware business. He was also prominent 
in democratic politics, represented the Second Ward 
in the City Council of Garrett, and was an active 
member of the Garrett Fire Department at the time 
of his death. His widow is still living in Garrett. 
There were three children : Walter W. ; Dessa, who 
graduated from the Garrett High School in igo6 
and is the wife of Harry M. Barrie ; and Russell M., 
clerk in a clothing and shoe store at Garrett. 

Walter W. Mountz spent his early life at Garrett, 
attended the grammar schools there and one year 
in high school, and on leaving school was in the 
West for two years. July 10, 1909, he married Lulu 
Maurer. She died in July, 1910, and on August 5, 
1912, he married Myrtle Osborne, of Kendallville, 
Indiana. Mrs. Mountz is a daughter of William S. 
and Anna (Johnson) Osborne and is a graduate of 
the Kendallville High School. They have one son, 
William W., born February 28, 1918. 

Mr. Mountz was elected for two terms as city clerk 
of Garrett, going into office January i, 1910, and 
serving seven years. He was reelected without oppo- 
sition but resigned toward, the close of his second 
term, on December i, 1916, to take up his duties as 
circuit clerk. Mr. Mountz is a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the Royal 
Arch Chapter at Garrett. He served as secretary 
of the Lodge of Eagles from June i, 1909, to Janu- 
ary I, 1917. He is also affiliated with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, a member of the Auburn Commer- 
cial Club, and of the Presbyterian Church. 

Carl A. Surfus is one of the younger business 
farmers of Noble County, has been very successful 
in handling land, crops and livestock, and is also 
one of the most influential in the public affairs of 
Noble Township. 

His home is a half mile north of Wolf Lake. He 
was born on a farm adjoining his present home 
December 31, 1881, a son of E. L. and Anna J. 
(Clark) Surfus. His father was born in Iowa 
and his mother in Ohio. Both the Clark and Surfiis 
families came to Noble Township and settled in 
the woods, and both families h^ve contributed much 
of the labor by which the present day improvements 
have been brought about. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. 
Surfus had two children, Carl A. and Stanley L., 
the latter of Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Carl A. Surfus grew up on a farm near Wolf 
Lake. He attended high school at Wolf Lake, and 
lived at home and acquired a practical knowledge 
of farming before he was ready to start out on his 
own account. 

He married Lottie Kiester, of Noble Township. 
She is also a graduate of the Wolf Lake High 
School. Mrs. Surfus is one of a large family of 
seven daughters and three sons, all living but one. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



This interesting family is named briefly as follows : 
Anna, wife of E. L. Prickett, former clerk of 
Noble County, and now living at Albion ; Martha, 
wife of C. E. Butts, of Sparta Township ; Nancy, 
deceased wife of C. H. Bender; J. T., of Washing- 
ton Township ; Hannah, wife of Claude Kimmell, 
of Sparta Township ; Mary, wife of Charles Beers ; 
Lee, of Washington Township ; George, of Noble 
Township; Lottie, Mrs. Surf us; and Ruth, wife of 
M. J. Beers, of Perry Township. 

After his marriage Mr. Surfus located on the 
farm where he now lives and has eighty acres 
under a high state of improvement and cultivation. 
He buys and feeds the Polled Angus cattle and 
also the Durhams, and is regarded as a man of 
special ability and wisdom in livestock husbandry. 
He is also a stockholder in the Wolf Lake State 
Bank. 

Mr. and Mrs. Surfus have three children : Claude 
E., born in 1910; Lora Belle, born in 1914; and 
Lucile, born in 1917. 

Mr. Surfus is a democrat in politics and was one 
of the youngest township trustees ever elected in 
Noble Township. He was onlj' twenty-six years 
old when he was chosen to that responsible office, 
and the four years he remained an incumbent fully 
justified the expectations of his friends and sup- 
porters. 

S. P. WiLLiBEY, who was born in Williams County, 
Ohio, and whose people were pioneers in that state, 
has been identified with Steuben County as a prac- 
tical farmer and thresherman for over thirty-five 
years, and is one of the leading men in influence 
and activities in Richland Township. 

Mr. Willibey was born in Williams County, Flor- 
ence Township, July 6, 1853, son of George and 
Abigail (Look) Willibey. George Willibey was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, July 6, 1819, son of 
John Willibey, who was an early settler in the old 
Ohio Western Reserve, and finally moved to Wil- 
liams County. Ohio. George Willibey was one of 
the first settlers in Florence Township of Williams 
County, and spent the rest of his active life on a 
farm which he developed from the woods. He 
erected the first buildings and cleared the first 
land constituting his farm. He died in 1905. His 
wife, who was born in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, August 18, 1818, daughter of David 
Look, died in 1904. They were the parents of six 
children : John, who served with honor in the 
Union army during the Civil war, Elizabeth, Anna, 
Mary Jane, S. P. and Jeremiah. Jeremiah died in 
childhood. 

S. P. Willibey secured his education in the public 
schools of Flo'ence Township, and from early man- 
hood his experience has been in growing crops, be- 
ginning in Florence Township and after 1883 con- 
tinuing in Richland Township of Steuben County. 
With the exception of five years spent in York 
Township he has lived in Richland Township ever 
since. He bought his present farm of eighty acres 
in section 8 of Richland Township in 1915, and 
carries on a good business as a general farmer and 
stock raiser, handling the big type Poland China 
hogs. The harvesting feature of farming has been 
a matter of particular concern to Mr. Willibey. For 
forty years he operated a threshing outfit every sea- 
son. 

Mr. Willibey married Harriet Lechleidner, daugh- 
ter of David and Rebecca Lechleidner. Nine chil- 
dren were born to their marriage, and they now 
have a number of grandchildren. Their children in 
order of birth were Maud May, Clarence, Blaine, 
Fred, Iva, Glenn, Paul, Orville and George David. 
Clarence died at the age of twenty-one. Maud May 



is the wife of Ernest Wisner, and her two daughters 
are Ila and Dorothy. Blaine married Blanche Gates 
and has three children, Seleta, Galor and Ivan. Fred 
married Emma Gilbert and has two children, Alene 
and Alton Gilbert. Iva is the wife of William 
Hopkins and has a son, Kenneth. Glenn married 
Wava Newman, and their one child is Raymond. 
Paul married Ruth Bowles and has a child, Leotto. 
The family are members of the United Brethren 
Church, and Mr. Willibey has given his due time 
and means to the support of all religious causes. In 
liis home church he has served as superintendent of 
the Sunday school, as a steward and trustee. 

Isaac Clyde Allen. One of the younger men in 
the agricultural community of Salem Township, 
Isaac Clyde Allen has had sufficient time to make 
his efforts count and has achieved the dignity of 
the ownership of a fine farm and is working steadily 
toward a larger prosperity and the important service 
which the farmer represents. 

Mr. Allen was born in Salem Township, July 27, 
1883, a son of Artemus and Alvira (Garrison) 
Allen. His father was a son of Justice Allen, who 
after the death of his wife in Ohio brought his son 
Artemus to Steuben County in early days, and he 
died near Stroh many years ago. Artemus Allen 
lived for a number of years with Isaac Davis, and 
he met there Alvira Garrison, who was born in 
Kosciusko County in 1854 and for many years was 
a member of the Davis household. After their 
marriage they settled on a farm one mile south and 
half a mile east of Salem Center, and on selling 
that forty acres moved to a place a mile east and 
bought eighty acres, later increasing it to 127 acres. 
Mrs. Alvira Allen also inherited eighty acres from 
Isaac Davis. Artemus Allen lived in Salem Town- 
ship until his death at the age of sixty-five, and 
his widow is still living on the old farm. Both 
were active members of the. Trinity Reformed 
Church, and he was a democrat in politics. They 
had nine children, named Samuel J., Edith, Ida 
May, Anna Elvira, Isaac Clyde, Everett E., Bertha, 
Amos, who died in infancy, and Wayne. 

Isaac Clyde Allen grew up on the home farm and 
had a public school education. Since early man- 
hood all his efforts have been expended on agricul- 
tural work, and he made his independent start with 
only forty acres. He acquired another forty' acres, 
and on selling this property bought in October, 1917, 
his present attractive and valuable farm of 120 
acres. He is engaged in general crop raising and 
stock raising. 

Mr. Allen is an independent democrat in politics 
and his wife is active in the Trinity Church. He 
married in 1904 Miss Ida May Ferris. From the 
age of two years she was reared in the home of 
Edward Noll of Salem Township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen have two children : Loyal W., born August 
6, 1906, and Fay E., born September 22, 1910. 

William Eckert. While there is now the fourth 
generation in the house of Eckert in DeKalb County, 
William Eckert of Locust Dale Farm in Fairfield 
and a brother, Jacob H. Eckert, of Kendallville, be- 
long to the second generation, being the only surviv- 
ing children in the family of Sebastian Eckert, who 
located in Fairfield March 28, 1855, and since that 
time Locust Dale has been the family homestead. 

The present owner of Locust Dale. William Eckert, 
was born there June 8, 1864, and his life has all been 
spent in one place, and his own children have had 
his childhood environment. 

There is Scotch, Welsh and German blood in the 
family. However, his father, Sebastian Eckert, was 
one of six children brought by their mother, Mrs. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



123 



(Pfeiflfer) Eckert, from Germany. Their father, 
Peter Eckert, died of a fever in March, 1830, and in 
May of that year the mother and her children em- 
barked for America. They were three months on the 
Atlantic, landing in August. She located in Frank- 
lin, Pennsylvania, and from there the family scattered, 
the mother finally going to St. Louis. Sebastian was 
her only son. The oldest daughter died in childhood. 
The other four sisters were Elizabeth, Margaret, 
Eve and Barbara. Sebastian, Margaret and Barbara 
all lived in DeKalb County. Elizabeth being the wife 
of John Sthair, a blacksmith, and Barbara the wife 
of Jerome Re3-nolds, a cabinet maker. Both these 
men once operated shops in Fairfield Center. All 
the family now lie buried in the Fairfield Cemetery. 

December 14, 1848, Sebastian Eckert married Susan 
Cox, a daughter of Jacob and Jane (Denman) Cox 
of Wayne Count}', Ohio. She was one of nine chil- 
dren : Eli, Mary, Susan, Freeman, Andrew, Rebekah 
Jane. .Mpheus, Samuel and Newton. Three of them, 
Susan, Eli and Andrew, were later citizens of De- 
Kalb County, and they all lie buried at Fairfield. 
The children of Sebastian and Susan Eckert were 
Elizabeth, Jacob, Margaret, Amiel, Alice, Florence, 
William, Belle, Luther, Kate and Spener, the only 
two living today being mentioned above. These 
children all had a common school education. The 
family were members of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. All but the two surviving brothers died 
before marriage. There are today only five voters 
in the Eckert family in DeKalb and Noble counties, 
and this vote is cast solidly in the interests of the 
democratic party. 

William Eckert and Miss Mary Sf. Ringer were 
married June 8, 1886, which was his twenty-second 
birthday and the eighteenth birthday of the bride. 
They were married at the home of her parents in 
Richland Township. She was a daughter of Jacob 
and Elizabeth (Wright) Ringer, whose family his- 
tory in DeKalb County goes back to 1853, when they 
came from Stark Count}-, Ohio. Jacob Ringer as an 
Ohio shoemaker had earned the money with which 
he bought his farm in Indiana. He was the only 
son of George and Alary (Herbster) Ringer. He 
had five sisters, the oldest dying before the birth 
of the others. The four to grow up were Mary, 
Susan, Leah and Margaret. 

The six children born to William and Mary Eckert 
are: Blanche R., wife of C. W. Getts ; Ethel, who 
died at the age of eleven days ; Roswell, who married 
Irene Stomm and has a son, Donald Cecil ; Imo, who 
was buried February 24, 1915, just one year from 
the date of her marriage with John Berkes ; Gran- 
ville J., who married Charlotte Bonbrake and has a 
son, William Louis, the first born in the fourth 
generation of the Eckert family in DeKalb County; 
and Martha Belle, the youngest daughter. The two 
grandchildren in the Eckert household are William 
Louis and Donald Cecil. 

Roswell and Granville and their cousin, Russell 
Eckert of Garrett, were all young men under the 
draft. Granville was temporarily exempted because 
he was engaged in agriculture. Roswell had military 
training at Camp Taylor, Camp McClellan and Camp 
Grant. He was battery clerk and was advanced to 
the grade of corporal when the armistice changed the 
prospect of so many young .American soldiers. Rus- 
sell Eckert was at Fort Thomas. The Eckert children 
were all given the same educational advantages, 
and Granville and Martha have diplomas from the 
common schools. 

Sebastian Eckert, founder of the family in Indiana, 
died at the family homestead September 6, 1890, 
while his wife lived on until March 19, 1919, and had 



survived to welcome the two grandchildren of the 
fourth generation. 

The farm buildings at Locust Dale were built in 
the reconstruction period following the Civil war, 
when there was an abundance of native timber, and 
the farmstead today is one of the well kept places 
in Fairfield Township. 

John A. Clingkkman. While not one of the 
largest farms in Noble County, Springhill Farm, 
of which John A. Clingerman is proprietor, has the 
distinctive characteristics of being a fine country 
home and a place where a good business is carried 
on in general farming and in stock raising. It is 
located in section 29 in Sparta Township and com- 
prises forty acres. It is the home of some high- 
class Jersey cattle and Shropshire sheep, Mr. Clin- 
german specializing in these branches of livestock 
husbandry. 

This is the farm where Mr. Clingerman was born 
March 31, 1867, a son of John and Matilda Clinger- 
man. His parents were both born in Ohio, were 
married there, and then came to Noble County and 
settled on the farm where they spent the rest of 
their days and where their son now lives. They 
were active members of tJie United Brethren 
Church. John Clingerman, Sr., saw active service 
as a Union soldier during the Civil war, for many 
years was a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, and in politics always voted republican. 
He and his wife had seven children, and the three 
still living are : Isaiah W. of Whitley County, 
Indiana; Ellora, wife of Frank Spark, of LaGrange 
County, and John A. 

John A. Clingerman as a boy attended the nearby 
district schools, and his career has been one of 
industry since early manhood. On June 6, 1804, he 
married Anna Adora Cripe. She was born in Noble 
County April 29, 1872, daughter of Noah and Lydia 
A. (Hammon) Cripe, the former a native of Elk- 
hart County and the latter of Ohio. The Cripe 
family is an old and prominent one of Elkhart 
County. Since their marriage Mr. Clingerman with 
the exception of two years has lived on the old 
homestead, and it has been owned by them for over 
twenty years. Mr. and Mrs. Clingerman have one 
son. Virgil W., born December 73, 1807. He has 
distinguished himself as a scholar. He graduated 
from the common schools when only thirteen, from 
the Cromwell High School at the age of seventeen, 
and for three terms attended Goshen College. He 
is now principal of the Laotto High School. Mr. 
Clingerman is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias 
Lodge at Cromwell and is a republican. He has 
served several terms as road supervisor. 

Charles H. Dull has been one of the most widely 
known farmers and livestock traders in Noble Coun- 
ty for many years. He has been a buyer and dealer 
in horses for twenty years, and most of his opera- 
tions in this field center at Ligonier. He also has a 
fine farm, where he resides, in section 6 in Sparta 
Township. 

Mr. Dull was born in Washington Township of 
Noble County. July 5, 1867, a son of Peter and Mary 
(Moore) Dull. His parents were natives of Ohio, 
and their respective families came at an early day 
ajid settled in Washington Township of Noble 
County, where Peter and Mary were married. They 
were farmers of Noble County for a number of 
years, and finally died at the home of their son 
Charles in Sparta Township. They were active in 
the Lutheran Church, and Peter Dull was a repub- 
lican in politics. Of their eight children, seven are 
mentioned : Cora A., deceased ; George W., who is 
associated with his brother Charles; Charles H.; 



124 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Perry, of Kosciusko County ; William, who lives in 
Ohio; John, of Sparta Township; Archie, of Elkhart 
Township, Noble County. 

Charles H. Dull lived in Washington Township 
until he was seven years old, and then went to 
York Township and at the age of eighteen removed 
to Kosciusko County. He acquired his education in 
the common schools, and in Kosciusko County he 
worked at monthly wages for five years. On March 
4, i8g2, he married Catherine Rapp, of Kosciusko 
County, where she was born. For several years 
Mr. and Mrs. Dull rented land, and then traded for 
their present place of 115 acres, the improvements of 
which and the value of the property represents many 
years of hard toil and good management on their 
part. Mr. Dull is also a stockholder in the Citizens 
Bank of Ligonier, and in the Farmers Elevator at 
Ligonier. 

He and his wife have one daughter, Ethel, a grad- 
uate of the Cromwell High School. She is now the 
wife of Ray Maggert and lives at Cromwell. Mr. 
Dull is affiliated with Cromwell Lodge of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a 
past noble grand. He has been quite active in re- 
publican politics, and is now a member of the County 
Central Committee, representing Sparta Township. 

Nelson Ellsworth Carey. From the standpoint 
of continuous ownership by one family one of the 
oldest farm homes in Steuben County is Pleasant 
View Farm in section 19 of Richland Township. Its 
present proprietor is Nelson Ellsworth Carey, who 
was born there, and the land was originally ac- 
quired by his father seventy-five years ago. 

The first of the family in Steuben County was 
his father, William S. Carey, who was born May 
15, 1818, son of John and Margaret Carey, who 
spent their last years in Kno.x County, Ohio. In 
that county William S. Carey married on February 
21, 1843, Melissa Gordon. She was born in New 
York State, January 28, 1825, a daughter of William 
and Mary Gordon. William Gordon, who was born 
in Manchester, England, September 17, 1773, was a 
son of a physician and silk manufacturer and a man 
of great influence in England. As a result of a 
disagreement with his father William, at the age 
of twelve, ran away to sea, and spent three years 
before the mast on a whaling vessel and later joined 
the English army, his father's influence securing 
him a colonel's commission. Part of his service 
was under the Duke of Wellington. In 1802 he left 
England and came to this country and in 1809 was 
married and in 1814 took up his residence in Mor- 
row County, Ohio. He and his wife reared a 
family of eight children. It is said that in his last 
years William Gordon suffered the keenest regret 
for his early relations with his family and planned 
to revisit the old home. However, he put off carry- 
ing out this design, and finally died in 1882, at the 
remarkable age of 109 years. In 1844 William S. 
Carey and wife came to Steuben County and settled 
in Richland Township, where he died February 27, 
1869, after having carried forward many of the 
early improvements on the farm. He and his wife 
were very active members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. She survived her husband many years 
and died in 1894, at the age of sixty-nine. 

Nelson Ellsworth Carey, who was born on the 
old homestead, November 29, 1861, has always lived 
in that locality. He attended the public schools at 
Alvarado, and since early manhood has been busily 
engaged on the home farm. He has it well im- 
proved and among other buildings has a double barn, 
each 30 by 50 feet. For some years he was a success- 
ful breeder of Duroc Jersey hogs, and all the hogs 
on his farm are pure bred though not registered. 



Mr. Carey is a republican, and has served as road 
supervisor. He is affiliated with the Lodge of 
Knights of Pythias at Metz, and is a member of the 
Christian Church at Eden, Ohio. 

On April 10, 1881, he married Miss Relefia Dally, 
daughter of Vincent Dally and a member of the 
prominent family of that name so frequently men- 
tioned in the annals of Steuben Countv. Mr. and 
Mrs. Carey have two children. The daughteir,- 
Melissa H., was born August 15, 1886, and was well 
educated in the public schools. 

The son, William Elmer Carey, is now in active 
charge of the home farm and one of the most pro- 
gressive young farmers in Richland Township. He 
was born April 26, 1896, and was educated in the 
public schools, graduating from the eighth grade at 
the age of thirteen and from the Eden High School 
in 1913. December 24, 1916, he married Miss Arilla 
A. Van Zile, of Richland Township, daughter of 
Alonzo and Sina (Strubel) Van Zile. To their 
marriage has been born one son, LaMar Gordon, 
January 27, 1918. 

William E. Carey is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias at Metz, and he and his wife are very active 
members of the Christian Church at Eden. He has 
been superintendent of the Sunday school for three 
years. Politically he votes as a republican. 

John K. Riddle is one of the old timers of Noble 
County, having lived here for seventy years, and 
throughout this long period has been actively identi- 
fied with farming. He now lives with his only son, 
O. F. Riddle, in Wayne Township. 

He was born in Morrow County, Ohio, April 20, 
1845, a son of Joseph B. and Traney M. (Knox) 
Riddle. Both parents were born in Richland County, 
Ohio. In 1848 they came to Noble County and when 
all the country was new settled in Jefferson Town- 
ship and lived there for some years, later moving to 
.\lbion in Noble County, where both of them died. 
Joseph B. Riddle was a republican in politics. Of 
their nine children six are still living: Elizabeth, 
widow of John Cotton ; William W., former treas- 
urer of Noble County, living at Kendallville ; John 
K. ; Homer; Comfort, widow of Henry Stanley; 
and Edith, wife of John G. Gill. 

John K. Riddle was three and a half years old 
when brought to Noble County and as a boy he at- 
tended the local schools near his father's home. His 
education was finished at the age of eighteen, and 
since then he has been bearing his part as a sturdy 
laborer in the world. At the age of twenty-one he 
started out for himself. January 29, 1871, he mar- 
ried Miss Jennie Foster. She was born in Noble 
County, and after over forty-one years of married 
companionship passed away April 16, 1912. Of her 
two children, one died in infancy. 

O. F. Riddle, only child of his parents still living, 
graduated from the Albion High School and also 
attended college at Lansing, Michigan. He married 
Lida Grate. They have four children : Howard 
and Ralph W., both students in high school ; Mar- 
garet, in the sixth grade ; and John Harold. O. F. 
Riddle is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is a republican voter. The home 
farm comprises 269 acres, highly cultivated, improved, 
and kept up in a high degree of productiveness. 

Ch.\rles W. Bender. One of the best improved 
farms in York Township of Noble County is that 
owned by C. W. Bender in sections 20 and 20. Mr. 
Bender has lived there practically all his life, and 
has succeeded beyond the ordinary as a farmer and 
stock raiser, and also as a capable citizen and worker 
in his community. 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



125 



He was born in the house where he is still living 
July I, 1870, son of John E. and Evaline (Lafevre) 
Bender. John E. Bender, his father, was born in 
Chester County, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1815. He 
was left an orphan at the age of seven and for the 
next ten years lived as a bound boy with Samuel 
McClintock. During that time he had no oppor- 
tunity to attend school, and was given a mere living, 
and left his employer with only an old suit of 
clothes. He then went to work on a salary, and 
the first year received only $8 a month. His wife, 
Evaline Lafevre, was born in Tennessee. In 1868 
they settled in Noble County, Indiana. John E. 
Bender and wife had four children: Charles W. ; 
Myra, deceased wife of Samuel DePew; John A., 
a farmer in York Township ; and Joseph, who died 
in infancy. 

Charles W. Bender grew up on the old farm in 
York Township and had a district school education. 
For many years he has been a general farmer, and 
now owns 200 acres of land. He is also a breeder 
of Belgian horses and has several pure blooded 
animals of that strain. He has done much shipping 
of live stock in past years. Mr. Bender was a 
charter member and one of the solicitors for the 
stock at the organization of the Kiramell State Bank 
and became one of its first directors. 

February 11, 1892, Mr. Bender married Miss 
Nancy E. Kiester. She was born in Washington 
Township of Noble County. They were happily 
married twenty-five years, and Mrs. Bender passed 
away November 7, 191 7. She was the mother of 
three children: Ermal, born .'Kpril 0, 1894, is a 
graduate of high school and attended Goshen Col- 
lege and is now the wife of Dr. Homer Hiatt, serv- 
ing with the rank of first lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps of the United States Army. Cecil, born De- 
cember 7. 1895, is also a high school graduate and is 
the wife of Ralph Denny, an attorney. Carl, born 
July 22, IQ02, has finished the common school course. 
Mr. Bender also has two grandchildren. 

He is a member of the Christian Church, as was 
his wife. He is past noble grand of Kimmell Lodge 
No. 7Ti of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
has sat in the Grand Lodge, and his wife was active 
as a grand of the Rebecca Lod.ge and also repre- 
sented her lodge in the Grand Lodge. 

Is.\AC Eaton. Large land ownership, good agri- 
cultural methods, nublic spirited citizenship and an 
influence steadily directed toward elevating the reli- 
gious and moral life of the community have been 
characteristics of the Eaton family in Steuben Coun- 
ty for many years. Mr. Isaac Eaton, one of the 
extensive land owners and successful farmers of 
Fremont Township, is the only child of the late 
Lucien B. and Melinda (Phelps") Eaton. On both 
sides he represents pioneer families in this section 
of Northeast Indiana. His mother, Melinda Phelns, 
was born near Brookville in Franklin County, In- 
diana, November 15, 1815. She was born when In- 
diana was still a territory. Her parents were 
Reuben B. and Ruth (Carson) Phelps. Reuben B. 
Phelps deserves a special memory as one of the 
earliest settlers of Steuben County, havinir moved 
here from Franklin County about i8.'?3. His place 
of settlement was on the left side of Lake James in 
Pleasant Township. This Steuben County pioneer 
had no male descendants, the line being carried on 
through his five daughters, Melinda, Lucinda, Julia, 
Ruby and Ruth. 

Lucien B. Eaton was born in Canada. December 
17. 1808. and died in February, 1889. He came to 
Steuben County from New York State, settling in 
Jamestown Township with the very first pioneers 
there in 1836. He was a man of unusual person- 



ality, business energy and enterprise, and at one 
time owned about goo acres of land in Steuben 
County, and also had extensive farming interests in 
Michigan, selling his Michigan property about 1875. 
These landed accumulations were enough to absorb 
the energies of an ordinary man, but in addition he 
did much work as a Methodist preacher, preaching 
in his home locality, and his last regular charge was 
in Whitley County, Indiana. 

Mr. Isaac Eaton acquired his education in the 
public schools of Fremont. He was born on the 
farm where he now lives, January 12, 1855. For 
over thirty years he has been a farmer in that 
neighborhood, and is the owner of over 500 acres. 
Mr. Eaton is thoroughly well informed on the Scrip- 
tures and Biblical history, and is a member of the 
"Beasterian" Church, the name of which is the coin- 
age of Doctor Lane, of Fort Wayne, and represents 
an effort to return to the original sources of reli- 
gion as given by God, untainted with paganism and 
racial antagonisms. 

Enoch Davis, who is now retired as one of the 
oldest residents in Clear Lake Township of Steuben 
County, grew up there from the age of ten years, 
and was for a long time a factor in the farming 
enterprise of that locality. 

Mr. Davis was born in Noble County, Ohio. July 
12, 1847, a son of Hiram and Esther (Jefferson) 
Davis. His parents came to Steuben County in 
1858, settling in Clear Lake Township. In 1862 
Hiram Davis bought a saw mill, and used it for 
the manufacture of lumber and incidentally as a 
means of clearing up much of the land in this part 
of the county. He died in 1897, at the age of 
eighty-six, while his wife passed away in 1895, aged 
seventy. They were the parents of six children : 
William, who enlisted in 1862 and served two years 
and ten months as a Union soldier and is now de- 
ceased ; Martha, deceased ; Enoch ; Joseph ; Samuel ; 
and Adelaide. Hiram Davis was a republican, and 
he and his wife were members of the United 
Brethren Church. 

Enoch Davis grew up in Steuben County, and 
after leaving the public schools went to work on a 
farm. In early manhood he bought forty acres in 
Fremont Township, and after selling that spent 
three years in California. On his return to Steuben 
County he acquired a farm of ninety-two acres, 
and on selling that bought the seventy-seven acres 
where he lives today. He has effected some of the 
good improvements on this land, and has good 
buildings but has turned over the management to a 
son and is now living retired. He is a republican, 
and with his wife is a member of the Latter Day 
Saints Church. 

In 1869 he married Dora Ellis. Thev had two 
children, Byron and Leona. Leona is the wife of 
Bert Dagert, of York Township. Byron, who was 
born January 2. 1872, owns forty-three acres of 
land in Fremont Township and rents and manages 
his father's farm. He married Allie Geedv, who 
died leaving him four children : Roy, Orville. 
Gladys and Golda. Roy saw two years of service 
in the National army, and was in France about six 
weeks. 

Clyde Franklin Wilsey. The Wilsey name has 
been one of honored consideration in DeKalb County 
since 1848 and has many worthy representatives here 
at present, a well known one being Clyde Franklin 
Wilsey, an active and substantial citizen of Corunna 
and the owner of the Corunna Telephone Exchange. 
Mr. Wilsey was born in DeKalb County September 



The first Wilsey in DeKalb County was Willi; 



H. 



126 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Wilsey, a native of New York, who married Ursula 
Jane Haskins, a native of Vermont, January 25, 
1843. Five years later they moved from New York 
to Indiana and entered land in Fairfield Township, 
DeKalb County, paying $1.25 an acre for the same. 
On that farm three generations of the Wilsey family 
were born. Henry E. Wilsey, father of Clyde F., 
was born here November 28, i860, and on January 
26, 1882, he was married to Mary L. Krum, who is 
a daughter of Jacob and Martha (Holden) Krum, 
old residents of Steuben County, Indiana. There 
were five children in the Krum family, namely: 
Martha, Elizabeth, Eugene, Allen and Minerva, the 
last named being deceased. Two children were 
born to Henry E. Wilsey and his wife: Clyde Frank- 
lin and Grace, the latter of whom was married De- 
cember 25, 1906, to Elmer E. Shipe, and they have 
one son, Ford. Henry E. Wilsey and wife reside 
at Hudson, Indiana. 

Clyde Franklin Wilsey was educated in the public 
schools. On November i, 1906, he bought the 
Corunna Telephone Exchange and has had charge 
ever since and many extensions have been made 
since that time, this exchange being now considered 
indispensable to both business and social life. For 
some years he was editor and publisher of the 
Corunna News. He has been active in community 
welfare effort, an example being his suggestions 
that a park be maintained along the New York Cen- 
tral Railway line at Corunna, and mainly through his 
efforts the plan was carried out, the park, with 
shrubbery, park seats, swings and other forms of 
amusement, together with band concerts ofter given, 
providing an admirable opportunity for out door en- 
joyment. In this and other ways Mr. Wilsey has 
made himself very unselfishly popular, an evidence 
of this popularity being shown when he was elected 
constable on the democratic ticket, although he had 
always been a republican. 

Only July 30, 1905, Mr. Wilsey was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Nettie A. Wilhelm, who is a daughter 
of John and Mary (Cook) Wilhelm, who were 
married July 9, 1865, and resided at Elkhart, Indiana, 
their children being: William, John, Mary, Albert, 
Harrison, Clarissa, Rilla, Nettie and Cora. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilsey have three children, the oldest born on 
the old homestead: Lester A., born May 15, 1906; 
Bernardine M., born October 29, 191 1; and Robert 
L., born February 6, 1915, the last two born in 
Corunna. Mr. and Mrs. Wilsey have a charming 
summer place in Island Cottage on Story Lake, and 
when not stopping there themselves, they generously 
permit their friends to use it. 

On January 25, 1893, the grandparents of Mr. Wil- 
sey celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. It 
had been the cherished ambition of the venerable 
grandmother to make the most of the preparations 
for this event with her own hands. It was an occa- 
sion never to be forgotten by her loving descendants, 
but these tender preparations probably overtaxed her 
strength, for she passed away ten days later and with 
her passed one of the noble pioneer women of De- 
Kalb County. The grandfather lived six years 
longer, passing away December 6, 1899. 

The early Wilsey family belonged to the United 
Brethren Church, while the Wilhelms were members 
of the Evangelical body. Clyde F. Wilsey and fam- 
ily belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Corunna. He is not active in fraternal life but as a 
prominent and responsible citizen constantly is in 
co-operation with others in laudable civic movements 
and in helpful enterprises here and elsewhere that 
relieve distress. 



Jack Buckles is distinguished among the resi- 
dents of York Township of Noble County as pro- 
prietor of the Maple Grove Stock Farm, where he 
breeds and raises some of the finest Shorthorn cattle 
and big type Poland China hogs found anywhere in 
Northern Indiana. The farm comprises 198 acres, 
located in the northwest quarter of section 32. 

Mr. Buckles was born in Washington Township 
of the same county November 22, 1866, son of John 
H. and Mary (Wiley) Buckles. His father, a na- 
tive of West Virginia, came to Noble County, In- 
diana, when only four years old, was reared here, 
and after his marriage located in Washington Town- 
ship, where he acquired a good farm of 160 acres. 
He is also a thresher man and sawmill man, and has 
a great deal of enterprise which he has used profit- 
ably both for himself and his community. He and 
his wife are members of the Christian Church. His 
wife is a native of Washington Township. They 
had a large family of children, noted briefly as 
follows: Jack; Nellie, wife of John Earnhard ; Ida, 
wife of Ed Pollock; Mary, wife of Frank Braden; 
James, a carpenter of Fort Wayne ; Austin Buckles, 
of Cygnet, Ohio; Jennie, wife of H. O. Barllet, of 
Chicago; Winifred, wife of Walter Sanders, of 
Marshalltown, Iowa ; Grace, wife of Louis Hade, of 
Wawaka, Indiana; and T. A., of Indianapolis. 

Jack Buckles grew up on his father's farm in 
Washington Township, and had a practical educa- 
tion to fit him for the duties and responsibilities of 
life. He married Minnie D. Blain. They had no 
children of their own but have an adopted daughter, 
Bonnie Louise, who was born February 10, 1916. 
Mr. Buckles is a member of Wolf Lake Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks of Ligonier, and in politics 
is a democrat. 

Arthur L. Budd is a well-known farmer and 
business man of Noble County, proprietor of the 
Glendale Farm of sixty-four acres in Green Town- 
ship, and also active in insurance and other busi- 
ness lines. 

Mr, Budd was born in Ashland County, Ohio, De- 
cember 31, 1879, but has lived in Noble County since 
boyhood. His parents, Thomas E. and Agnes 
(Davis) Budd, both natives of Ashland County, 
grew up and married there and were farmers in that 
locality. The mother died on the home farm in 
Ashland County in 1881. Thomas Budd continued 
to live in Ashland County until 1887, when he moved 
to Noble County, Indiana, and bought 120 acres in 
Green Township. He continued active as a farmer 
until 1906, when he became one of the organizers 
and a director and is now president of the Farmers 
.State Bank at Churubusco, in which town he makes 
his home. He and his first wife had two children : 
Eflie J., wife of Leroy Ressler, of Green Township, 
and .'\rthur L. By his second marriage he also had 
two children ; one of whom died at the age of eight- 
een months. The surviving child, Erlin, was 
educated in the common schools and is now a second 
lieutenant in the American army, and when last re- 
ported was at Winchester, England. 

Arthur L. Budd was eight years old when his 
father came to Noble County, and here he grew to 
manhood and received a good education in the local 
schools. He continued to live with his father until 
his marriage with Mina May McWilliams, daughter 
of Frank W. McWilliams. 

Mr. Budd has made a success of the management 
of his small but well improved and productive farm. 
He IS also agent for the Fidelity Phoenix Fire 
Insurance Company, and does a considerable busi- 
ness as a horse buyer. He has been active in re- 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



127 



publican politics and has been honored with positions 
of trust and responsibility by his fellow citizens. 

Robert N. Tate. For over sixty years the name 
Tate has been an honored one in Noble County, 
always representing sturdy, honest and industrious 
people, good citizens and supporters of education 
and religion. The old Tate farm in Wayne Town- 
ship, on rural route No. 3 out of Kendallville, 
now has as its proprietor Robert N. Tate, son of 
the first settler in that community. 

Robert N. Tate was born in Wayne Township 
October 13, 1856. His father, James Tate, was 
born at Paris, Flaxby Grange, Westriding, York- 
shire, England, February 22, 1822. When a young 
man he came to Ohio, and there married Carolina 
Julia Scofield. After a number of years they left 
Ohio and in 1854 settled in the northeast corner 
of Wayne Township, Noble County. In 1864, ten 
years later, they moved to the farm where Robert 
N. Tate now lives. Ifi 1872 James Tate moved to 
Orange Township, near Rome City, and there he 
spent his last years. He and his wife were active 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
gave liberally to its support and all its causes. 
He was also a Mason and was a leader in the local 
republican party. Of the six children only two are 
now living: Robert N. and Dora L., the latter the 
widow of W. L. Wones and living in Warsaw, 
Indiana. 

Robert N. Tate has spent nearly all his life 
in Orange and Wayne townships of Noble County. 
His education was supplied by the district schools. 
He came to manhood with a good training and 
discipline in farm work and inherited the old home- 
stead from his father. He has 170 acres of well 
cultivated land in Wayne Township and eighty 
acres in Orange Township, and is also a stockholder 
in the State Bank of Wolcottville and in the Noble 
Motor Truck Company. 

Mr. Tate is a republican and a member of the 
Orange Township Advisory Board. He is affiliated 
with Rome City Lodge No. 451, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, with Kendallville Chapter No. 
64, Royal Arch Masons, with the Council,, Royal 
and Select Masters and with the Knights Templar 
Commandery No. 19. 

Charles L. Borton, gardener, poultry raiser and 
siunmer resort proprietor of Clear Lake, has been 
a resident of Steuben County for twenty years and 
came here from Fulton County, Ohio, where his 
people were among the earliest settlers. 

The Borton ancestry in America goes back to 
Quakers who on account of religious persecution 
emigrated from England in 1674 and settled in New 
Jersey. Mr. Borton's grandfather, John Borton, 
came from New Jersey to Ohio in 1836 and located 
in the woods of Fulton Count}% his first home being 
a log cabin. He was greatly prospered and at one 
time owned more than 1,300 acres. His wife was 
Elizabeth Taylor. Charles L. Borton was born in 
Fulton County, April 9, 1868, a son of William and 
Regina (Oliver) Borton. His parents have spent 
all their lives in Fulton County and his father is a 
farmer. They had five children: Ada, deceased; 
Charles ; Sadie, deceased ; John ; and Arthur. 

Charles L. Borton was reared and educated in his 
native county and was a farmer there until 1899, 
when he moved to Steuben County and acquired his 
present farm of sixty-four acres in Clear Lake 
Township. He took this land when its improve- 
ments were still largely characterized by a log house. 
That old building has been replaced by modern, up- 
to-date structures, and he now has facilities for 
handling with profit a large flock of White Leghorn 



chickens, makes a specialty of raising garden prod- 
uce, and has part of his land situated on the banks 
of Clear Lake, set apart for about forty cottages, 
all of which are usually occupied in the summer 
season. 

Mr. Borton is a republican in politics, and he 
served as township trustee and assessor for one 
term each. In 1894 he married Miss Nora Alberta 
Baker, of Hillsdale County, Michigan. They have 
four children : Ruth, who was educated in the 
public schools and tlie high school at Montgomery, 
Michigan, is the wife of Glen Forester; Allen, a 
graduate of the Montgomery High School, is em- 
ployed at Fremont, Indiana ; Dorothy is a student 
in the Fremont High School, and Chester is still 
in district school. 

WiLLARD S. TusTisoN. The residence of Mr. Tusti- 
son is in the extreme southeast corner of DeKalb 
County. He is a farmer, and was born on the land 
which he owns today, in section 33, April 29, 1859. 
Mr. Tustison has always enjoyed the confidence of 
his neighbors and friends in DeKalb County and is 
a former trustee of Newville Township. 

His parents were Sebastian and Anna (Allen) 
Tustison. His father was born in Crawford County, 
Ohio, a son of Nelson and Sarah (BrOwn) Tustison. 
Nelson Tustison was a native of Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, and when he ran away from home at the age 
of sixteen went to sea and was a sailor to many of 
the ports of the world for sixteen years. He left the 
sea and settled at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania County, 
where he married and afterward moved to Crawford, 
Ohio, and speiit the rest of his life as a farmer. 
He possessed unusual business judgment, a great 
amount of energy, and accumulated about 600 acres 
of land in Crawford County. These ample .posses- 
sions he shared with his family of nine sons and one 
daughter, all of whom are now deceased. 

Sebastian Tustison grew up in Crawford County, 
had a common school education, and in 1845 moved 
to DeKalb County, Indiana, and after his marriage 
settled in the southeastern corner of the county. 
He was a farmer there and at one time was superin- 
tendent of some men employed on the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railway. He also participated in local affairs, 
being assessor and justice of the peace and in politics 
was a democrat. He was the father of four children: 
George W. and Henry, deceased; Mary Jane, wife 
of Joseph Langham ; and Willard S. 

Willard S. Tustison grew up on the home farm 
and had a common school education. On December 
12, 1878, he married Lois Jump, who was born in 
Scipio Township of Allen County, Indiana. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Tustison lived for 
three years in Scipio Township, and rented his 
father-in-law's farm. They then returned to New- 
ville Township and bought sixty acres and after 
four years he bought out the other heirs in the old 
Tustison homestead. Mr. Tustison has ninety-one 
acres in his farm and has it stocked with some good 
grade Durham cattle. As a factor in local politics 
he served six years as justice of the peace, four 
years as assessor, and four years as township trus- 
tee. Like his father he is a democrat, and he and 
his family are members of the Methodist Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tustison had eight children, seven 
of whom are still living: Delmer D., of Hillsdale, 
Michigan: Linnie, wife of Frank Lash, of Michigan; 
Grace, wife of Guy McCurdy, of Allen County, In- 
diana; Rena, wife of Albert Shaffer, of Garrett; 
Owen S., of Garrett, Indiana, who is a graduate of 
the Hicksville, Ohio, High School, as is also his 
next younger brother, Ross C. ; George W., who was 
with the Aviation Corps of the American Army 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



and died November 17, 1918, while in the overseas 
service near Liverpool, England; and Paul, who is 
married and lives at Hicksville, Ohio. 

John A. Baughman. Some of the best land of 
Noble County is in Noble Township, so there also 
are found some of the best and most progressive 
farmers. One of them is John A. Baughman, who 
has lived in that locality for over forty years, and 
though he started life with practically no capital, 
he has made good in every sense of the word and 
is now owner of one of the excellent places in his 
locality. 

Mr. Baughman was born in Richland County, 
Ohio, November 26, 1855, a son of Gideon and Mar- 
garet (Swiggart) Baughman. The Baughmans 
originally came from Germany and were early set- 
tlers in the colony of Virginia. Gideon Baughman 
was a son of Henry and Susan (Trumbull) Baugh- 
man. Margaret Swiggart was a daughter of John 
and Barbara Swiggart, early residents of Stark 
County, Ohio. John Swiggart was born in 1779 and 
served as a captain in the War of 1812 and was 
the first school teacher in Monroe Township of 
Richland County, Ohio. Gideon Baughman and 
wife were reared and married in Ohio, the former 
being a native of Ashland County and the latter of 
Stark County. They lived there for many years 
and in 1876 moved to Noble County, Indiana, spend- 
ing the rest of their lives in this county. They 
were members of the Lutheran Church. The father 
was a democrat. Of six children two are still liv- 
ing: Susan, widow of Archie Collins, living in 
Ohio, and John A. The four deceased were Michael, 
Martin L., Henry M. and Elizabeth, the latter the 
wife of John Oiler. 

John A. Baughman spent the first twenty years 
of his' life in his native county in Ohio and was 
educated in the common schools. Soon after he came 
to Noble County he married on August 19, 1877, 
Melissa J. River. She was born in Noble County, 
April 19, 1861, and was educated in the common 
schools. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Baugh- 
man rented his father's farm until his means had 
increased as a result of their mutual thrift and in- 
dustry to a point where he could buy the farm, and 
he has spent practically all his adult life in this one 
locality. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baughman had three children. 
Clyde, the oldest, completed the work of the com- 
mon schools and also attended Valparaiso College 
and Hillsdale College in Michigan, and is now a 
railroad employe. Chauncey, a graduate of the 
common schools and of the Valparaiso College, is a 
farmer and teacher in Noble Township. Iva, who 
is the wife of Floy Stureman, of Noble Township, 
also attended Valparaiso and Terre Haute colleges. 

Mr. Baughman has been quite active in the affairs 
of the democratic party in his locality. He is en- 
gaged in .general farming and the livestock business 
and has 88K' acres, all of which he manages with a 
higli degree of productiveness. 

Frank Hanlon is a former trustee of Green 
Township of Noble County, and is one of the best 
known men in that community. For many years he 
was a successful teacher, and some of his most 
loyal friends are his old pupils. He has also been 
a farmer, and is now giving most of his time to the 
management of his place in section 2 of Green 
Township. 

On the farm where he now lives he was born, 
August 8, 1866, son of James aiwi Mary (Hendricks) 
Hanlon. His parents were both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. His father was born in Allegheny County 
and came to Noble County, Indiana, in 1856, grew 



up here and married, then developed the land where 
his son now lives into a good farm. The parents 
were both active members of the Summit Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and in politics the father was a 
democrat. There were three children : William, 
who died at the age of thirteen months; Frank; and 
Warren, who died when twelve years of age. 

Frank Hanlon while reared in a rural environment 
and having experience from early boyhood in the 
duties of the farm, acquired a liberal education apart 
from the opportunities presented by the local dis- 
trict schools. He attended the Albion Normal 
School and also the Methodist College at Fort 
Wayne. He taught his first term of school in 1884, 
thirty-five years ago, and there was probably not a 
year in which he did not give several months or 
more to teaching until 1907. He then gave up the 
profession in order to take complete supervision of 
the home farm, but in the winter of 1918, probably 
as a patriotic service, he again taught a term of 
school. He has a well cultivated farm of 160 acres, 
and he is a thorough and systematic farmer. 

In the fall of 1908 Mr. Hanlon was elected trustee 
of Green Township, and filled that office to the 
satisfaction of all concerned for six years. He is 
a democrat, and he and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a trustee, 
steward and superintendent of the Sunday school. 
September 5, 1889, he married Margaret J. McCoy, 
who was born in Green Township. 

James E. Terry did his principal work as a 
farmer in an era of low prices and adverse condi- 
tions, but made such good use of his time and energy 
as to win a competence, which now enables him to 
enjoy life at leisure and in retirement. His home 
for many years has been at Nevada Mills in James- 
town Township. 

Mr. Terry was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, 
April 8, 1849, a" son of Thompson C. and Harriet 
(Kichey) Terry, both natives of New York State. 
His father was born in 1828 and his mother in 
Genesee County in 1833. Thompson Terry was an 
early settler in the woods of Sandusky County, 
Ohio, cleared up a farm there, and in 1864 again 
ventured as a pioneer to Jamestown Township in 
Steuben County, where he bought the George New- 
nam farm and finally sold that and moved to Nevada 
Mills in the same township, where he engaged in 
merchandising. He died in 1897 and his widow on 
May 1-5, 1916. He was quite active in republican 
politics for a number of years, and held the office 
of justice of the peace for nearly a quarter of a 
century. Both he and his wife were liberal in their 
religious views. They had three children : James 
E. ; Alice Jeanette, who died in 1864, at the age of 
four years ; and George, a resident of Millgrove 
Township in Steuben County. 

James E. Terry was about fourteen years old 
when his parents moved to Steuben County, and 
finished his education here in the public schools and 
also attended the Orland Academy and the college 
at Angola, and thus prepared he became a success- 
ful teacher, a vocation he followed five terms. With 
that exception he has !)een farming since early man- 
hood until he retired, and is owner of a place of 
180 acres. Mr. Terry nas had his home at Nevada 
Mills since 1884. In poi'itics he is a republican with- 
out any official record, and attends the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a member. 

October i, 1871, he niarried Miss Helen Hobson, 
of Steuben County. She died in January, 1895, the 
mother of three children. Raymond, who is a mer- 
chant at Inverness in Steuben County, married Lulu 
McNett, and they have two children, Eleanor and 
Ralph. Fred, a merchant at Nevada Mills, married 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



129 



lola Bachelor, and has had two daughters, Helen, 
deceased, and Genevieve. Lou is the wife of Perry 
Sprague, a lumber merchant at Syracuse, Indiana, 
and is the mother of one son and two daughters, 
Alice, Nellie and Dale. In Januarj', 1897, Mr. Terry 
married Flossie Kreuder, who was born in Medina 
County, Ohio, August l, 1868, a daughter of Conrad 
and Catherine (Turner) Kreuder, the former a 
native of Germany and the latter of Ohio. The 
Kreuder family came to Steuben County in 1876, 
settling in Pleasant Township, where Mrs. Terry's 
father died in 1883, at the age of sixty-four, and 
her mother in 1894, aged sixty-two. Mr. Kreuder 
was a farmer. Mrs. Terry had a public school edu- 
cation, attended the Tri-State College, and was a 
sucecssful teacher for ten years. She was one of 
a family of four children, named Mary, Theodore, 
and Flora and Flossie, twins. 

Fr.'vnk L. Kiplinger is president and manager of 
the Knisely Dry Goods Company of Butler, one of 
the oldest business establishments of DeKalb County. 
The Knisely brothers were in business at Butler be- 
ginning nearly fifty years ago. The present firm is 
an incorporation, with Mr. Kiplinger its executive 
head and H. B. Miller, secretary and treasurer, and 
the directors are Mr. Kiplinger, H. B. and E. C. 
Miller and Mrs. Kiplinger. 

Mr. Kiplinger was born in Ashland County, Ohio, 
July 29. 1859. He has been a merchant nearly all 
his life. His father was a country merchant in 
Ohio, and the son when not in the village schools 
was working in his father's store. At the age of 
twenty-one he went out to Kansas and had a varied 
mercantile experience in that state for several years. 
On coming to Indiana he was a clerk in the employ 
of Knisely Brothers at Butler for ten years. After 
that he was a traveling dry goods salesman over 
Indiana Territory, representing a Cleveland house 
for ten years. He then returned to Butler and 
bought an interest in and took the management of 
the old business of Knisely Brothers. 

Mr. Kiplinger married Delia Miller, of Waterloo, 
Indiana, a graduate of the high school of that city. 
Mrs. Kiplinger has been prominent in local affairs 
at Butler and was one of those instrumental in 
securing the public library, and for the past twelve 
years has served as secretary of the Library Board. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kiplinger are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church and he is a trustee. He 
is affiliated with Forest Lodge No. 259, Free and 
Accepted Masons, with the Royal Arch Chapter and 
Council, the Apollo Commandery of Knights Tem- 
plar at Kendallville, was a Shriner and was a mem- 
ber of the Scottish Rite Class of 1919. 

Geokgf. Glovd. One of the old and carefully 
tended homesteads of Sparta Township in Noble 
County is owned and managed by the Gloyd broth- 
ers, comprising George and W. H. Gloyd, who have 
been successfully identified with agriculture and 
stock raising and with the citizenship of that locality 
practically all their lives. The farm is on the Lin- 
coln Highway, a mile southeast of Kimmell. 

George Gloyd was born on that farm December 
8, 1848, a son of William and Matilda (Beachgood) 
Gloyd His great-grandfather, Daniel Gloyd, was 
a soldier in the American Revolution, enlisting at 
the age of sixteen and at the battle of Bunker Hill 
was wounded while fighting for the cause of inde- 
pendence. William Gloyd, grandfather of George, 
was an overseer in the employ of Major Lewis, 
who married General Washington's step-daughter. 
William Gloyd, Jr., father of the Gloyd brothers, 
was a native of Missouri and moved from there to 
Vol. n— 9 



Ohio, where he married Matilda Beachgood. She 
was born in Maryland and her father was a soldier 
in the War of 1812 under General Jackson. Her 
brother, James Beachgood, was with Phil Sheridan's 
army at Winchester, and served all through the war. 
William and Matilda Gloyd after their marriage 
moved from Ohio to Noble County, Indiana, and 
were pioneers in Sparta Township. They were 
members of the Sparta Christian Church and were 
highly thought of people all their lives. Of their 
six children three are still living: Caroline, wife 
of John Foster, of York Township, who served in 
the Civil war ; George and W. H. Gloyd. 

W. H. Gloyd was also born on the old homestead, 
had a district school education, and on March 15, 
1877, married Mary R. Bowers. She had two 
brothers who were Union soldiers. Henry S. 
Bowers enlisted in 1861 and remained until the 
close of the war, being with Sherman on the march 
to the sea and participating in twenty-three battles 
but was never wounded. The other brother was in 
the war two years. 

The Gloyd brothers are members of the Christian 
Church and both are active republicans, their father 
having been a whig and a charter member of the 
republican party. The Gloyd farm comprises 240 
acres. 

John Hemry has been a citizen of Steuben Coun- 
ty for more than half a century, and the name is 
well known in York and Clear Lake townships, 
where the people of this name were pioneers. The 
Hemry family were among the earliest settlers in 
the State of Ohio, the old home having been in 
Crawford County for many years. 

John Hemry was born in that Ohio county, No- 
vember 2, 1838, a son of Abram and Mary Ann (Mc- 
Claskey) Hemry, and grandson of Isaac and Nancy 
(McCullen) Hemry. Isaac Hemry lived for a num- 
ber of years in Carroll County, Ohio, and in 1832 
moved to Crawford County, where he died August 
II, 1868, at the age of eighty-four. His widow sur- 
vived him and passed away at the age of ninety-one 
in August, 187Q. Isaac Hemry during the War of 
1812 was captain of an Ohio militia company. 

Abram Hemry was born in Carroll County, Ohio, 
in 1812. His wife, Mary Ann McClaskey, was born 
in Ashland County of that state in 1820, a daughter 
of Jacob McClaskey. In 1845 Abram Hemry 
brought his family to Steuben County, but some 
years later returned to Crawford County, Ohio, 
living there for four years, and afterward settling 
again on his farm in York Township, where he died 
when about sixty-five years old. His wife died in 
Steuben County about 1850. At one time he owned 
160 acres in Steuben County, and at the time of his 
death his farm consisted of seventy-five acres. He 
and his first wife had nine children, named John, 
Margaret Ann, Nancy, Lydia, Rebecca, Lila, George, 
.Andrew and Eva. For his second wife Abram 
Hemry married Mrs. Elizabeth Hanselman and had 
one child, Lizzie. 

John Hemry was seven years old when his par- 
ents first came to Steuben County. When he was 
seventeen he went back to Crawford County, and 
in 1864 settled permanently in Steuben County, buy- 
mg forty acres of land in York Township. At the 
present time he owns a farm of 109 acres, also had 
twenty acres in Ohio for .some years, and has sold 
twelve and a half acres to his son-in-law. His farm 
is well improved with buildings, his barn being 
40 by 72 feet. He is still acting and looking after 
his farm though eighty-one years of age. Mr. 
Hemry is a democrat in politics. 

In 1864 he married Miss Rebecca Ramsey, of 
Crawford County, Ohio. She died in 1905, at the 



130 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



age of sixty-seven. They had two children: Cora 
is the deceased wife of Albert Barnes and had one 
son, John. Carl, now deceased, married Edith Isen- 
hour, and they had two children, including one son. 
Kenneth. 

Clarence A. Mallory. Some of the earliest 
names in the chronicles of Jamestown Township of 
Steuben County are those of the Mallory family. 
Clarence A. Mallory is a member of the third gen- 
eration of the family and has spent practically all 
his life on the old Mallory homestead in James- 
town. -IT 

His father was Asa Mallory, who was born in Ver- 
mont in 1824, a son of David Mallory, who first 
came to Steuben County in 1835. Asa Mallory fol- 
lowed him soon afterward, and was long identified 
with the upright .citizenship of the county. Some 
additional facts concerning his history are published 
elsewhere in this work. . ^ , , 

Clarence A. Mallory was born on his fathers 
homestead November 8, 1876. He acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools and since early manhood 
has been a practical farmer. He now handles the 
operations of 115 acres of the old homestead where 
his mother is still living. He devotes his land to 
general farming and stockraising. Mr. Mallory is 
a democrat, and he and his wife attend the com- 
munity Church at Jamestown village. 

November 29, 1900, he married Miss Lodema 
Lilly, of Branch County, Michigan. They have two 
children: Emory Wright, born December 18, 1901, 
now a junior in the Fremont High School; and 
Leona Lilly, born November 2, 1907. 

William Deems is one of the honored survivors 
of the great Civil war, and for three years he rep- 
resented DeKalb County in that great conflict. He 
has been a resident of DeKalb County all his life, 
and is well deserving of the comfortable retirement 
he now enjoys on his home farm in Wilmington 
Township. 

He was born in that township November 22, 1843, 
a son of George and Hannah (Dudgeon) Deems, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of 
Ohio. George Deems was one of the pioneers of 
DeKalb County and lived in Wilmington Township 
until he met death in 1845, being killed by a falling 
tree. The care and rearing of the six children then 
devolved upon his widow. These six children were 
named, John, Joseph, Eli, Eliza, George and Will- 
iam, William being the only survivor. 

William Deems grew up on the home farrn and 
had a limited education in the log cabin district 
schools of his day. He was only eighteen when 
the war broke out, and in August, 1862, he enlisted 
in Company H of the Eighty-Eighth Indiana Infan- 
try. He served faithfully as a corporal and was mus- 
tered out in June, 1865. After the war he returned 
to DeKalb County, farmed and worked as a farm 
hand, and eventually acquired an independent hold- 
ing. He now has seventy acres of good farm land 
in Wilmington Township. Mr. Deems' parents were 
members of the Methodist Church. He is affiliated 
with Meade Post No. 44 of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, and is a republican in politics. 

William R. Cole. The home of William R. Cole 
is a mile north of Wolf Lake in Noble County. It 
is one of the fine farms in that locality, and its 
proprietor is a man of thorough training and experi- 
ence and capabilities both as a farmer, business man 
and as a public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. Cole was born in Greene Township of the 
same county, December 27, 1870, son of James R. 



and Martha J. (Ray) Cole. His father was born 
May 2, 1844, and his mother December 3, 1848. They 
were married in Noble County, Indiana, in 1867, and 
for the next two years lived on a farm in Greene 
Township, then moved to JefTerson Township, where 
they bought forty acres, and after five years sold 
that and moved to York Township, where James 
Cole acquired eighty acres and for many years was 
successfully identified with its cultivation and man- 
agement. In 1916 he moved to Albion, where he is 
now living retired. He was born in Ashland Coun- 
ty, Ohio, and as a boy enlisted in the First Ohio 
Regiment and served as a Union soldier throughout 
the Civil war. He has long been identified with the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and is a republican 
in politics and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. He and his wife had ten children, whose 
names and dates of birth are as follows : Franjc 
W., September 10, 1868; William R., December 27, 
1870; Elmer, August 9, 1873; Prentis B., February 
9, 1876; Floyd, March 12, 1880; Mary J., June 8, 
1882; Mattie, January 27, 1885; Nellie, June 2, 1887; 
Catherine, in 1889; and Belle, in 1890. Mattie, 
Catherine, and Belle are all graduates of the Albion 
High School. 

William R. Cole has lived all his life in Noble 
County, and acquired a common school education 
as a preparation for the duties of his mature years. 
He left home when nearly twenty-one, and has since 
been making his own way in the world, and had 
acquired a fine reputation as a farmer. After his 
marriage he rented a farm in Jefferson township for 
four years, then bought eighty acres west of Wolf 
Lake, and on selling that acquired his present farm 
of 160 acres. He raises and feeds cattle and hogs, 
and is also a stockholder in the Wolf Lake State 
Bank. Mr. Cole is a republican but has no desire 
to hold public office. He has been affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Albion. 

October 11, 1899, he married Dora B. Gray, daugh- 
ter of William D. and Rachel Gray. She was born 
on the farm where she and her husband are now 
living. They have three children : Harold G., a 
graduate of the common schools ; Mabel M., who 
has also completed the work of the common schools ; 
and Martha R. 

Ira E. Brill, who is successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in LaGrange County, is a 
worthy representative of the farming element of 
Northeast Indiana. He has spent his life in Indiana, 
and has made his present success as an industrious 
and capable farmer, a man of broad information and 
very popular among his fellow citizens. He is 
proprietor of the Scenic Hill Farm, comprising 100 
acres in Johnson Township. Mr. Brill has a number 
of good grade Belgian horses. 

He was born in Elkhart Township of Noble Coun- 
ty, October 30, 1867, a son of George W. and Char- 
lotte E. (Trittipo) Brill, the former a native of 
Ohio and the latter of Virginia. They were mar- 
ried in Indiana and located in LaGrange County and 
later in Elkhart Township of Noble County, where 
they spent the rest of their years. The father was 
an active member of the Lutheran Church. In the 
family were eight children : Lurella E., wife of W. 
M. Rendfro; Walter E., of Elkhart Township, 
Noble County; Franklin E,, of Ohio; Mrs. Ida M. 
Reed, of Ligonier; Ira E. ; Lillie M., wife of Joe 
Finck ; Melvin G., of Ligonier; and Beulah, wife of 
Elza Smith. 

Ira E. Brill grew up on his father's farm in Noble 
County, attended common schools, and for the past 
thirty years has been a hard working member of the 
agricultural community. In 1892 he married Jennie 
M. Shanower, of Johnson Township. They have 







0^^^^-^^^^ (^. CY^M^^7-z^^V&5^-^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



131 



one son, Russell R., who was born October 29, 1895. 
He married Amy A. Gordon and has one child, 
Hugh G., born November 15, 1918. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brill are members of the Baptist Church, and in 
politics he is a republican. 

Fremont Bachelor. For many years the name 
Bachelor has been signihcant o£ good farming 
metliods, large farms, well managed, and a high 
degree of enterprise and public spirit in all matters 
of community interest, ihis is one of the oldest 
families of Steuben County, and some of the im- 
portant facts in the history of some of the early 
members are found on other pages. 

Fremont Bachelor, of Alillgrove Township, is a 
son of the late Amos Bachelor, who in his time 
was one of the largest land owners in the county. 
Fremont was born in Pleasant Township March 19, 
1830, and as a boy attended district schools in Mill- 
grove and Jamestown townships, and hnished his 
education with a high school course in Waterloo. 
As a young man he began farming on the old home- 
stead. In 1887 he married Miss Harriet Ebbert, a 
daughter of Isaac and Lorena Ebbert. 

Mr. Bachelor then took his wife to a farm at In- 
verness, and lived in that locality for thirteen years. 
In the fall of 1S99 he returned to the old farm, occu- 
pying it when his father retired and moved to An- 
gola. He has had his home there tor twenty years, 
and now owns 230 acres. Much of the substantial 
equipment of the farm is due to his work and in- 
vestment. He has remodeled the house, and a large 
barn and silo were also constructed by him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bachelor have one daughter, wife 
of Fred Collins. Mr. and Airs. Collins have one 
son, Don Fremont. 

Frank Teutsch owns a lot of good land in DeKalb 
County, his home farm of eighty acres being in Troy 
Township. He has another tract of seventy acres in 
the same township and 120 acres in Franklin Town- 
ship. He has been a hard working citizen and 
farmer for over twenty years, and in that time has 
bought and paid for, largely from his labors and 
the products of the soil, 130 acres of the land he 
owns. He keeps good livestock of different grades, 
and is an active member of the Arctic Cooperative 
Association. 

Mr. Teutsch was born in Franklin Township 
March 13, 1873, a son of Peter and Artemisia (.Olds) 
Teutsch. Peter Teutsch was born in Alsace, trance, 
March 22, 1830, a son of Michael Teutsch, who 
brought his family to America in i860, settling in 
Franklin Township of DeKalb County. Peter 
Teutsch grew up on the farm, was educated partly 
in France and partly in DeKalb County, and he lived 
in Franklin 1 ownship until late in life, when he 
retired to Butler, where he and his wife died. He 
married Artemisia Olds January 3, 1873. Her father 
was an early settler of Franklin Township and she 
was born in DeKalb County. Peter Teutsch and wife 
were members of the United Brethren Church, and 
he was a republican in politics. They had four chil- 
dren, one dying in infancy. The three living are 
Frank; Foster, who married Elsie Campbell and 
lives in Franklin Township; and Leota, wife of 
Logan Woods of Fort Wayne. 

Frank Teutsch spent his early life on the home 
farm and acquired a common school education. On 
June 20, 1898, he married Saloma Mark, who was 
born in Franklin Township. Since his marriage Mr. 
Teutsch has occupied and operated his home farm 
of eighty acres. He is a republican in politics. He 
and his wife have three children: Mildred, Loren 



and Roy. Mildred graduated from the common 
schools in 1919. 

Chari.es E. Pollock has made his mark among 
the citizens of Washington Township in Noble 
County and is a very progressive, live and enter- 
prising farmer. His present home is located two 
and one-half miles west of Wolf Lake. 

He was born in Ligonier, Indiana, June 20, 1861, 
son of Cyrus and Martha (Kendall) Pollock. His 
father was born in Richland County, Ohio, April 12, 
1832, and his mother in Greene County, Ohio, May 
3, 1833. Both the Pollock and Kendall families came 
in an early day to Noble County, Indiana, settling 
in the woods of Sparta Township, where Cyrus and 
Martha were married. For several years they con- 
tinued to live in Sparta Township, then moved to 
Perry Township, and finally to Ligonier, buying a 
farm in York Township. In that community they 
spent their last years. They were members of the 
Universalist Church, and Cyrus Pollock was a re- 
publican. He served as superintendent of the 
County Infirmary from 1876 to 1881. In the family 
were nine children, seven of whom are still living : 
Charles E. ; Morton, a resident of Angola; Ella, 
wife of William Laf ong ; Edwin, of Wolf Lake; 
Laura, wife of Myron Baker; Lizzie, wife of Harry 
Schlotterback ; and Vivian the wife of Joseph 
Geiger. One of the deceased children was named 
Milton. 

Charles E. Pollock spent his boyhood days in York 
Township, and his early advantages were supplied 
by the district schools. He remained at home till 
the age of twenty-two, and since then has been 
solving the problems of life on his own account. The 
farm his wife owns comprises 112 acres, and in im- 
provements and productiveness bares favorable com- 
parison with any farm in Washington Township. 
Mr. Pollock served seven years as assessor of York 
Township. 

He married for his first wife Mary L. Wright, 
who was born in Noble County, was well educated 
in the common and high schools and was a teacher 
before her marriage. The three children born to 
them are all now deceased. Their names were : 
Holland, a graduate of Albion High School; Elva 
M., who also graduated from the high school and 
died at the age of twe»ty-f our ; and one daughter 
that died in infancy. The mother of these children 
died in 1907. On February 28, 1918, Mr. Pollock 
married Mrs. Clara L. McKenzie. She was born 
in Stark County, Ohio, June 8, 1859, and came with 
her parents to Kosciusko County, Indiana, locating 
near Pierceton, and six months later the family 
moved to Washington Township, Noble County, and 
Mrs. Pollock grew up on a farm adjoining that of 
her husband. She was married to Royal McKenzie 
on -'\ugust 27, 1913. He died July 16, 1914. Mrs. 
Pollock is a stockholder in the Wolf Lake State 
Bank. Mr. and Mrs. Pollock are members of the 
Christian Church, and he served many years as a 
deacon and is one of the trustees of the Eel River 
Christian Conference. In politics he is a republican. 

Amos E. Loncnecker, who has spent all the 
years since early childhood on one farm in Milford 
Township of LaGrange County, is regarded as a 
man of exceptional ability in general farming and 
stock raising. From his farm he has sent many 
carloads of choice stock to market, and he knows 
that branch of agriculture probably as well as any 
other man in LaGrange County. 

He was born in Seneca County, Ohio, February 
iS, 1870, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Hampshire) 
Longnecker. His father was born in Seneca County 



132 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



in November, 1844, and he and his wife were 
married October i, 1863. They came to Indiana 
in 1871, locating in Milford Township. Late in 
life Jacob Longnecker moved to South Milford, 
where he died February 7, 1903. His wife was born 
in Fostoria. Ohio, November 18, 1841. and died 
January 5, 1905. Both were active members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, while the father was 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and was a 
republican. There were two children in the family, 
Jessie M. and Amos E. Jessie is the wife of 
George Nifer. and they live in Milford Township. 

Amos E. Longnecker was one year old when 
his parents came to Indiana and four years old 
when they established their home on the farm where 
he now lives. Besides the district schools he at- 
tended the Tri-State Normal at Angola, but the 
greater part of his life's efforts have been confined 
to farming. 

May 31, 1892, he married Mabel C. Teal. She 
was born in Clear Spring Township December 11, 
1873, and was educated in the district schools. Since 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Longnecker have 
occupied the home farm. They have two children, 
Ota E., born February 23, 1894, a graduate of 
high school and the wife of Harry L. Reed; and 
Jacob A., born December 19, 1897, who after finish- 
ing his high school course attended Purdue Uni- 
versity and for about six months was in the air 
service of the army in France. 

Mr. Longnecker is prominent in the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, is a past noble grand of 
the lodge at South Milford, a past patriarch of 
the Encampment, while he and his wife are both 
past grands of the Rebekahs. Politically he is a 
republican. Mr. Longnecker's farm comprises 191 
acres, and for a number of years he has used 
It largely as a feeding ground for livestock. He 
is president of the South Milford Shippers' Associa- 
tion and its manager. 

Mrs. Longnecker is a daughter of Ashbury and 
Ellen (Myers) Teal. Her father was born in 
Wayne County, Ohio, March 14, 1837, and her 
mother in DeKalb County, Indiana, March 20, 1846. 
Ashbury Teal came to Northeast Indiana when a 
youth, was married October II, 1861, and died at 
Montpelier, Ohio, May I, 191 1- He was a democrat 
in politics. In the Teal fiimily were five children, 
all living, named Edward E., Mabel C, Eleanor, 
John A., and Charles V. 

Thomas M. Ott. Clover Leaf Farm in Noble 
Township of Noble County is one of the high class 
places where the agricultural art is seen at its best, 
and the management and appearance of the farm 
stamps its owner, Thomas M. Ott, as one of the 
leading agriculturists of the county. The farm com- 
prises 200 acres, and Mr. Ott also owns another 
place of eighty acres in the same locality. 

Clover Leaf Farm represents to him not only a 
business and his present home but also the associa- 
tions of early childhood. He was born there De- 
cember 15, 1853, a son of Abraham and Sarah (Mor- 
gan) Ott' His mother was a native of England and 
was a small child when brought to the United 
States bv her parents. His father was born in 
Maryland. Both families subsequently settled in 
Preble County, Ohio, where Abraham Ott and wife 
were married. In 1840 they came to Noble County, 
Indiana, locating on land which he had pre-empted 
in 1838, being the original owner direct from the 
Government. Abraham Ott was a man of many fine 
qualities which constituted him a leader in the com- 
munity, and he was active in politics as a republican 
and as a member of the Christian Church. Of nine 
children four are still living: Julia A. Winebremer, 



widow of David S. Winebremer ; George W., a 
farmer in Allen County, Indiana ; Almina, widow of 
John R. Young ; and Thomas Ott. 

Thomas Ott has seldom for any great length of 
time been away from the farm home where he was 
born. He attended the common schools, and re- 
mained with his father and finally succeeded to the 
ownership of the place. 

December 11, 1879. he married Alta A. Seymoure. 
She was born in Noble Township, and she and her 
husband grew up in the same locality. They have 
five children: Charles A., a graduate of Wolf 
Lake High School, is married and lives in Noble 
County; Lura, a graduate of the common schools, 
still at home; Frank J., a graduate of high school, 
is married and lives on a farm in Noble Township; 
Harvey, a graduate of high school, and Elmina, 
who has also finished a high school course. 

Mr. Ott and family are members of the Chris- 
tian Church, and he and his wife and daughters are 
members of the Pythian Sisters. He is affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Wolf Lake 
and is past chancellor and a member of the Grand 
Lodge. In politics he is a republican, has served as 
a member of the Advisory Board and every worthy 
movement in his community is certain of his support 
and co-operation. He is one of the stockholders in 
the Farmers State' Bank at Wolf Lake, is a director 
in the Albion National Bank and a stockholder in 
the Albion Grist Mill. 

Glenn Brown. Some of the most important in- 
terests of agriculture and stock industry in Steuben 
County are concentrated in the Brown family. Glenn 
Brown, a son of the well known Steuben County 
land owner, Frank M. Brown, of Fremont, whose 
career and family connections are reviewed on other 
pages, is personally directing many of the family 
interests and is one of the leading farmers of the 
county. 

Mr. Brown was born in Jamestown Township • 
January 6, 1883, acquired a good education in the 
district schools, the high school at Jamestown, also 
the high school at Fremont, and was a student in 
the Tri-State Normal College at Angola. He has 
been farming on his own responsibility since 1909, 
and handles more than 300 acres of his father's 
land in Jamestown Township. The field crops under 
his management seldom figure as sources of direct 
income. The principal business is cattle and hogs. 
Mr. Brown feeds about four carloads of cattle for 
the market every year, and in the spring of 1919 
he put 265 hogs on the way to market condition, 
at a time when the price of hogs was the highest in 
history. 

In 1908 Mr. Brown married Pearl Legg, daughter 
of G. D. and Adaline (Fulmer) Legg. They have 
two young sons, Roscoe E. and Russell L. 

Jonathan Wilhelm. A highly esteemed and 
widely known resident of DeKalb County, who has 
made his home here for sixty-eight years and has 
witnessed and taken part in the development of this 
section of Indiana, is Jonathan Wilhelm, who lives 
practically retired in his comfortable home at Water- 
loo. He was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, 
January 18, 1843, and was eight years old when he 
accompanied his parents, David and Christina 
(Shaumbacher) Wilhelm, to DeKalb County. 

David Wilhelm was born in Columbiana County, 
Ohio, of German parents. He was reared to farm 
pursuits and when he reached manhood married 
Christina Shaumbacher, who was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, came from there as an immigrant 
to Ohio, and in that state supported herself until 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



133 



licr marriage. Six children were born in Columbiana 
County and two more were added to the family after 
settlement was made in Indiana. Of these children 
but two survive : Jonathan and Caroline. 

Jonathan Wilhelm grew up on a farm and gave 
his father assistance, as was the duty of a good 
son. He well remembers the old days when forests 
covered a large amount of the present richly culti- 
vated farm acreage and when the main highways 
were little more than Indian trails. In his boyhood 
a village called Uniontown stood on the site of the 
present busy City of Waterloo. His father had to 
haul all family supplies from Fort Wayne. With 
the coming of such sturdy settlers as the Wilhelms, 
however, improvement began and constant develop- 
ment has followed. After embarking in business for 
himself Mr. Wilhelm for many years engaged in 
farming and bought and shipped livestock, his main 
market being Buffalo, although demands from Cleve- 
land were also attended to, and he has additionally 
done shipping to Chicago. He still owns 326 acres 
in four different farms or tracts of land in Smith- 
held Township, over which he maintains oversight. 

Jonathan Wilhelm was united in marriage to Mary 
E. Geeting, who had accompanied her mother, Mrs. 
Sophronia Geeting, from Canton, Ohio, to DeKalb 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm became the parents 
of four daughters : Lizzie, Sophronia, Gertrude and 
Mary. Lizzie who is deceased was the wife of P. 
A. Bohler and the mother of four children namely: 
Ralph, Elmer, lone and Floyd. During the World 
war Ralph went to France in an engineer corps with 
the American Expeditionary Forces. Elmer was 
also in service, attached to the Coast Defense Corps 
on the coast of Florida. Both were at home at 
the time of their mother's death. Sophronia and 
Gertrude reside with their father at Waterloo, look- 
ing after his comfort since the death of their mother. 
Mary, the youngest daughter, is the wife of R. C. 
Thompson, and Mr. Wilhelm's only sister is a mem- 
ber of the Thompson household. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson have two children, Lavon and Roger. 

Mr. Wilhelm has never been active in a political 
sense but has always been a helpful and conscientious 
citizen, practical in business and honest and upright 
in every relation of life. 

Capt., Lewis W. Griffith. In the death of Capt. 
Lewis W. Griffith on January 25, ic;ig. there passed 
away a brave and gallant soldier and a citizen of 
Steubeji County whose life was a long exemplifica- 
tion of civic virtue and fidelity to duty. 

Captain Griffith was born in Tuscarawus County, 
Ohio, June 17, 1838, a son of John and Jemima 
(Gossage) Griffith, the story of whose lives is told 
on other pages. Captain Griffith was twelve years 
old when his parents moved to DeKalb County, In- 
diana, and when about nineteen he accompanied 
them to Otsego Township in Steuben County. He 
was educated in the public schools and on July 25, 
1861, enlisted in Company A of the Forty-Fourth 
Indiana Infantry. He was in the siege and capture 
of Fort Donelson, was wounded at Pittsburg Land- 
ing, and for gallant conduct at the battle of Stone 
River was promoted from sergeant to first lieuten- 
ant, and later was with the Forty-Fourth when it 
Was almost annihilated at the battle of Chickamauga, 
where he was again wounded and received a cap- 
tain's commission. He and his surviving compan- 
ions of the regiment were afterward put on post 
duty. Captain Griffith veteranized and remained in 
the army until October 22, 1865. Captain Griffith 
was at one time commander of Steuben Post of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

After the war he returned home and engaged in 



farming and buying and shipping livestock. His 
army service caused a permanent disability. 

He was a stanch republican. In 1868 he was 
elected assessor of Otsego Township, and later 
was county assessor and deputy county auditor, and 
had a long official record of about twenty-five years. 
He was a stanch republican and was affiliated with 
the Masonic Lodge and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Hamilton. 

On September i, 1861, after he had enlisted and 
before he was called to duty, he married Betsy 
Carpenter, who is still living. Her parents were 
Harlow J. and Fanny (Merry) Carpenter. Harlow 
J. Carpenter was born in Vermont in 1813, went to 
Ohio in early manhood, and was married there in 
1836, his wife being a native of Ohio, born in the 
same year as her husband. In 1849 Harlow Car- 
penter moved to Steuben County, buymg land in 
Otsego Township. For many years he was one of 
the leading members and local preachers of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and was widely known 
as Elder Carpenter. He died April 30, 1883, and 
after his death the church in Otsego Center was 
rededicated under the name Carpenter's Chapel. 

Captain and Mrs. Griffith had ten children. 
Emma, who became the wife of Roscoe Harps'*;r 
lives in Kansas and their son Claud was in the 
famous Thirty-fifth Division as a corporal, and was 
a participant in the battle of the Argonne Forest. 
Jessie is the widow of John Hammond, who left 
four children, Harry, Harold, Joyce and Ruth. 
Of these Harold was in the Thirty-Second Division 
in France and Harry was with the navy at the Great 
Lakes Training Station. Edna, the third child, is the 
wife of John Zimmerman, living in the State of 
Washington. Sarah married William Healey and 
has three children, Charles, Pauline and Griffith. 
Nellie died at the age of twenty years. George 
married Lillian Isenhour, and during the Spanish- 
American war he was a member of the One Hundred 
and Fifty-Seventh Indiana Volunteers. Shirley 
married Pearl Curl, and their children are Edna. 
Bertha, Lewis, Bettie, Yovona and Thomas. Ford 
died at the age of eight years. Bert was in the 
army during the World war. Vella is the wife of 
Merle Mortorff, and their three children are Helen, 
John and Alda. 

Elias W. Olinghousf., who is now concentrating 
his energies upon his farm in section 31 of Clear 
Spring Township in LaGrange County, became 
widely known over this section of Northeast In- 
diana as a veteran thresherman, a business he fol- 
lowed forty years. 

He was born in Eden Township a half mile west 
of Topeka, Indiana, December 11, 1853, a son of 
Jonathan and Mary (Collet) Olinghouse. His par- 
ents were both natives of Ohio and grew up and 
were married in Indiana, in LaGrange County, near 
Topeka. They settled on a farm a half mile east of 
Topeka, where Jonathan Olinghouse conducted a 
blacksmith shop in addition to clearing up and de- 
veloping his land. In 1878 he moved to another 
farm four miles southeast of LaGrange, and spent 
his last days there. His first wife died in Clear 
Spring Township. They were active members of 
the Methodist Church. Jonathan Olinghouse had 
fourteen children by his two marriages. His first 
wife was the mother of four sons and three daugh- 
ters, six of whom are still living : Elias W. : 
Charles, of Ligonier ; Theo, deceased: Burther, 
who lives six miles east of LaGrange: .^da. wife of 
Harvev Babb ; Em. wife of O. C. Harsh; Marv, 
wife of C. E. Babb. 

Elias W. Olinghouse grew up on the home farm 
and had a common school education. At the age 
of nineteen he began working out for his living, and 



134 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



ill 1874 bought a threshing outfit, which he operated 
successfully every season for forty years. He owns 
1S7 acres in his home farm in LaGrange County and 
also has forty acres in Oklahoma. He is a stock- 
holder in the State Bank of Topeka. 

Mr. Olinghouse married Miss Catherine Medlaum. 
Their children are Russell. Ray and Roy, twins, and 
Martha, wife of Frank Dovel. Mr. Olinghouse is a 
member of Hawpatch Lodge No. 760, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past noble 
grand, and is a member of the Encampment No. 133. 
He has sat in the Grand Lodge of that order. 
Politically he is a republican. 

Joseph Rohrabaugh lived a life of e.xtreme in- 
dustry and to good purpose, started out in young 
manhood without resources beyond the e.xperience 
he had acquired working for others, was a farm 
hand, a renter, and eventually acquired a good place 
of his own. 

He was born in DeKalb County, Indiana, February 
5, 1861, the only child of Joseph and Mary Ann 
(Frick) Rohrabaugh, early settlers of DeKalb 
County. Joseph was a small child when his father 
died. His father was well educated, taught school 
in early life and was also a stone and brick mason 
by trade. The widowed mother married John 
Rubley, and by that marriage had two children, 
John H. and Elizabeth. 

Joseph Rohrabaugh at the age of eight years 
moved with his mother to Steuben County, and 
from that time made his home in Jamestown Town- 
ship. He assisted his stepfather in clearing up the 
farm. Later he worked out by the month, spend- 
ing eighteen summers in that way. For nine years 
he was a renter and in 1901 bought eighty acres 
of land in Jamestown Township. He made the 
land pay for itself and give him a good living be- 
sides, and he improved it with a substantial barn 
and had much to show for his efforts. In politics he 
was a democrat, and his wife was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

April 2, 1892, Mr. Rohrabaugh married Abbie U. 
Latta. She was born in Branch County, Michigan, 
in 1874, a daughter of Moses and Jane (West) Latta. 
Her mother was a native of Steuben County, daugh- 
ter of George and Sarah (Sams) West. Moses 
Latta came to Steuben County when a young man, 
and after his marriage settled in Pleasant Township 
and later in Jamestown Township, where he died 
in 1906, at the age of seventy-four. His wife died 
in 1904, at the age of sixty. They were the parents 
of three children : Abbie, Jennie and Moses. Mrs. 
Rohrabaugh's mother married for her first husband 
Robert Sillabaugh, and by that union had two chil- 
dren, Milo J. and Robert Morton, both now de- 
ceased. 

Both the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Rohra- 
baugh died early in infancy. Mary, born in 1894, 
lived nine months, while Christian, born in 1897, 
died eleven days later. 

Richard L. Cook. There have been representa- 
tives of four generations of the Cook family to 
spend part of their mature years in LaGrange County, 
and their activities have been particularly manifested 
in the agricultural community of Van Buren Town- 
ship. 

A fine farm in that locality managed for many 
years by Richard L. Cook was the scene of his 
birth on July 29, 1879. He is a son of Adelbert 
and Orlinda Bell (Parker) Cook and a grandson of 
William and Catherine (Fowler) Cook, while his 
great-grandparents were John and Mary Cook. 
William Cook was born in England and came with 
his parents to America early in the last century. 



The Cook family settled in LaGrange County in 
1831 and John Cook died the same year of his set- 
tlement here. John and Mary Cook had four chil- 
dren : William, Elizabeth, George and Jane. Will- 
iam Cook was married in LaGrange County, and 
his children were Samuel, Marie, Charles and Adel- 
bert. William Cook bought 180 acres in Van Buren 
Township, and lived there until his death in 1904, 
at the advanced age of ninety-two. 

Adelbert Cook was born in Van Buren Township 
September 26, 1847, grew up on the old Cook Farm, 
was educated in common schools, and has spent his 
active life as a farmer. He owns 183 acres, and this 
is the farm where his son Richard was born and 
where the latter has been in full charge as manager 
for many years. Adelbert Cook is a democrat, and 
that was also the politics of his father, William. 
His wife was born September 2, 1857. 

Richard L. Cook grew up on the old homestead, 
attended the local schools and for about twenty-five 
years has had an increasing share of responsibilities 
in connection with running the old homestead. He 
is a democrat like his father and grandfather and 
is affiliated with Lodge No. 698 of the Masons at 
Howe. 

In 191 1 he married Esther L. Firestone. She was 
born in Elkhart County February 2, 1890, a daughter 
of Jacob and Nancy Firestone. Her mother is still 
living. Richard L. Cook and wife have one daughter, 
Kathryn Virginia, born April 7, 1917. 

Clarence Hanselman. A farm in Otsego Town- 
ship that has been improved by the labors of two 
generations of the well-known Hanselman family 
is in section 5. comprising l4Ckacres, and now owned 
and cultivated by Clarence Hanselman. Mr. Han- 
selman is one of the most successful representatives 
of his family and has proved his worth both as a 
practical farmer and as a public-spirited citizen. 

He was born on the homestead where he still 
lives, October 19, 1875, a son of John Quincy and 
Margaret (Kankamp) Hanselman and a grandson 
of Aaron Hanselman. A more detailed record of 
this family will be found on other pages of this 
publication. Clarence Hanselman grew up on the 
home farm. After acquiring a public school educa- 
tion he took up farming as his serious career, and in 
course of years acquired the old homestead of 140 
acres. He has remodeled the barn, and installed 
many other improvements, including a furnace in 
his home. He is a breeder of pure bred Shorthorn 
cattle and also keeps the best grades of * Duroc 
Jersey hogs. Politically Mr. Hanselman is a re- 
publican. 

October 30, 1907, he married Miss Lela Dora Sut- 
ton, member of an old and prominent family of 
Steuben County. She was born in Scott Township, 
March 7, 1882, a daughter of Roswell and Emma 
J. (Waller) Sutton. Her parents were both natives 
of Steuben County, her father born April 27, 1852, 
and her mother on January I, 1859. Roswell Sutton 
was a son of Roswell and Nancy (McMinn) Sutton, 
both pioneers of Northeast Indiana. Roswell, Sr., 
was the first, or one of the first, teachers in Steuben 
County. Emma J. (Waller) Sutton, who died 
March ,?, 1912, was a daughter of Jacob and Rhoda 
(Trobridge) Waller, likewise pioneers of Steuben 
County. Mrs. Hanselman's father is still living in 
Scott Township. He had four children, named, 
Delevan. Robert, Lela Dora and Orville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hanselman have a son and daughter, Russell 
Clarence, born October 3, 1908, and Helen Ruth, 
born August I, 1911. 

RoY Perkins, cashier of the Farmers State Bank 
of Stroh, has been identified with that institution two 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



135 



years, and is one of the leading business men of 
LaGrange County. 

He represents a family well known for their en- 
terprise and good citizenship in Northeast Indiana. 
He was born on a farm in Milford Township, 
August 26, 1881, a son of Samuel and Emma 
(Mains) Perkins. Some additional facts regarding 
his father and the early history of the family will be 
found on other pages. Samuel Perkins and wife, 
who spent their last years on a farm in section 23 
of Milford Township, were active in the Methodist 
Church, and he was a republican. They were the 
parents of five sons and the four still living are J. D., 
of Milford; M. S., of Milford; Clyde, of Milford; 
and Roy. The Perkins brothers have a number of 
individual interests and are also associates in the 
ownership of the Stroh Grain Company, and for five 
years were engaged in drainage contracting. 

Roy Perkins grew up on the home farm in Mil- 
ford Township and graduated from the South Mil- 
ford High School and spent three years in the State 
Normal. He is well known for his splendid work 
as a teacher. For thirteen years he was engaged in 
schoolroom work, and during that time was super- 
intendent of the South Milford school five years and 
principal of the Stroh school four years. 

The Farmers State Bank of Stroh was organized 
November 16, 1915. Its officers are: H. B. Lewis, 
president : S. A. Stout, vice president ; Roy Perkins, 
cashier, while the Board of Directors consist of H. 
B. Lewis, S. A. Stout, Roy Perkins, M. S. Perkins, 
J. D. Perkins, J. B. Hayward, R. O. Conklin, F. N. 
Wilson and E. E. Goodsell. The bank is capitalized 
at $25,000. 

November 28, 1905, Mr. Perkins married Opal 
Lovett. She is a graduate of the South Milford 
High School. They have four children, named Mar- 
jorie, Katherine, Dale and George. Mr. Perkins is 
a past master and charter member of Philo Lodge 
No. 672. .Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and is 
also a past giand of the Odd Fellows. His wife is 
both a Rebekah and a member of the Eastern Star. 
Politically he is affiliated with the republican party. 

Charles B. Oury is a resident of Jackson Town- 
ship, Steuben County. Farming has constituted his 
work, and he has been a busy and successful agri- 
culturist for the past twenty years. In that time 
he has acquired a good farm of his own, and his 
prosperity is very much in evidence. 

Mr. Oury, who is connected with several leading 
families of Steuben Countj', was born in Seneca 
County, Ohio, October 21, 1871, but has lived in 
Steuben County since early childhood. He is a 
son of William and Rachel (Bowerman) Oury, the 
former born in Knox County, Ohio, in 1849, and 
the latter in Seneca County, a daughter of Simon 
and Lydia (Spangle) Bowerman. William Oury, 
who died in igoi, came to Steuben County about 
1874, and after 1876 had a farm in sections 16 and 21 
of Jackson Township. 

Charles D. Oury was the oldest of six children. 
He attended district school No. 4 in Jackson Town- 
ship, and went to work as a young man at farming. 
In 1899 he moved to Pleasant Township, and in 
1901 moved to another farm in Springfield Town- 
ship of LaGrange County, where he directed the 
operations of 290 acres for ten years. He bought 
his present place in section 4 of Jackson Township 
in 191 1. He has a farm of 120 acres, well improved 
and increasing in value every year under his man- 
agement. Mr. Oury is affiliated with the Masonic 
Lodge at Flint. 

May 29, 1897, he married ^fiss Emma Dudlev, a 
daughter of Grove H. and Mary (Closson) Dudley. 
Reference to her father is made on other pages of 



this publication. Mr. and Mrs. Oury have four 
children : Maynard, born September 8, 1899 ; Way- 
land, born November 25, 1901, and died August 25, 
191 1 ; Ruth Marguerite, born October 20, 1904; and 
Mildred Rachel, born October i, 1908. 

Levi I. Miller. Everyone having business rela- 
tions with the community of Shipshewana knows the 
work and position of Levi I. Miller as cashier of 
the Farmers State Bank. Mr. Miller has been one 
of the leading young business men of that town 
nearly twenty years. 

He was born in Clay Township of LaGrange 
County July 10, 1877, and represents an old family, 
early settled in Northeast Indiana, and formerly 
of Pennsylvania. The Millers represented many of 
the fine and enviable qualities of the sturdy Men- 
nonites, who were so prominent in the early life 
and affairs of Pennsylvania. He is a son of Daniel 
J. and Catherine (Thomas) Miller, both natives of 
Somerset County, Pennsylvania. His father was 
born January 17, 1849, and his mother on January 
23, 1846. Catherine Thomas, who died January 22, 
1905, was a daughter of Jacob and Rachel (Plough) 
Thomas. 

The great-grandfather of Levi I. Miller was 
Christian Miller, whose father came over from 
Germany and located in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. 
There are more than 700 descendants of Christian 
Miller, and of this great family connection there 
are sixty-six who are ministers and deacons in the 
Mennonite Church. 

Jacob S. Miller, grandfather of the Shipshewana 
banker, was born in Somerset County December 10, 
1795. He came to Clay Township, LaGrange County, 
in 1866, and lived in that locality until his death 
on January 26, 1874. He was twice married, and 
by both wives had eighteen children. His first wife 
was Catherine Kime, who died in 1832. She was the 
mother of Christian. Henry, Jacob, who died in 
infancy, Joseph, Martha, John, George and Fannie, 
who died at the age of seventeen. Jacob S. Miller 
married for his second wife Fannie Hershberger^ 
who was born May 9, 1806. Her children, ten in 
number, were Susan, Barbara, Katie, Sarah, Lydia, 
Moses, Lizzie, Fannie, Daniel J. and Polly. 

Daniel J. Miller came to LaGrange County with 
his parents when seventeen years of age, and a few 
years later bought his father's old homestead and 
lived there in Clay Township until about 1880. Since 
then he has made his home in Newbury Township 
and is owner of 100 acres of good farming land. 
He and his wife had three children: Harry D., 
Levi I. and Lucy, who is the wife of Herbert Hos- 
tetler and has a daughter, Arlene. 

Levi I. Miller attended the district schools of 
Newbury Township, is a graduate of the Shipshe- 
wana High School, and in the same year completed 
a commercial course in Valparaiso University. Dur- 
ing his first year out of school he was employed 
by the Farver Brothers Lumber Company at Ship- 
shewana, but in 1901 entered upon his banking career 
as assistant cashier of the Bank of Shipshewana. 
When this bank was reorganized in October, 1907, 
and the name changed to the Farmers State Bank 
he was promoted to the post of cashier and is the 
genial and efficient man with whom most of the 
patrons of that bank have done business ever since. 
Mr. Miller also writes fire and tornado insurance 
and is owner of a farm in Newbury Township. He 
was honored with the responsibilities of trustee of 
Newbury Township from January, 1915, to January, 
1919. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Shipshewana. 



136 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



June 6, 1906, he married Amanda Bowers, a 
daughter of Samuel and Catherine Bowers. They 
have two children : Helen, born January 10, 1912, 
and Stanley, born January 25, 1915. 

George H. Walberry. A special place of esteem 
has always been reserved for George H. Walberry 
in Otsego Township of Steuben County, where he 
has spent forty-five years of his life. Mr. Walberry 
made an interesting record as a soldier of the 
Union during the Civil war. He served with an 
Ohio regiment, and after coming to Indiana busied 
himself for many years in clearing and developing 
a good farm in Otsego Township and is still living 
there though now retired. 

He was born at Fremont in Sandusky County, 
Ohio, October 26, 1845, a son of Christian and 
Sophia (Miller) Walberry. His father was born 
in Germany, came to the United States at the age 
of twenty-two, and was married the same year. His 
wife was a native of Pennsylvania. Christian Wal- 
berry had a tragic end. He had been away from 
home working for a neighbor, and on his return 
alone he was taken ill and died, and his body was 
not found for three days. His death occurred in 
July, 1846. George H. Walberry was then an in- 
fant, and the other child was Rhoda Ann. In 1854 
the widowed mother married William Burkett, who 
died in 1864, the father of five children, Ellen Jane, 
George W., Caroline, Angeline and Charlotte. The 
first two are now deceased. The mother spent her 
last years at Elkhart, Indiana, where she died Janu- 
ary 9, 1883. 

The family circumstances being as they were 
George H. Walberry early had to face serious re- 
sponsibilities upon his own account. He acquired 
some education in Sandusky County, and at the age 
of fifteen began working in sawmills and on farms. 
On December Q, 1863, at the age of eighteen, he 
enlisted in the Ninth Company of the First Battalion 
of Ohio Sharpshooters. This company was after- 
wards assigned to the Si.xtieth Ohio Infantry, but 
after a protest to the Government it served its orig- 
inal purpose as sharpshooters for the Second 
Brigade, Third Division, Ninth Corps of the Army 
of the Potomac. Mr. Walberry was in his first 
battle at the Wilderness and later at Spottsylvania 
and Cold Harbor was under fire for seven days. 
He was in the siege of Petersburg, and was one of 
a party of twenty volunteers who responded to a 
call to" "go over the top" and capture a portion of 
the enemy's works. After the successful charge 
only ten were left uninjured. Mr. Walberry par- 
ticipated in thirteen battles, serving under Grant 
most of the time, was at the surrender of Appomat- 
tox, and was a special guard on a number of oc- 
casions. He stood guard at the Carroll prison in 
Washington when Mrs. Suratt, the famous spy and 
an accomplice in the murder of Lincoln, was 
hanged. 

Mr. Walberry received his honorable discharge 
July 28, 1865, and then returned home to his mother 
and worked at farming for a few years. On De- 
cember 5, 1875, he came to Steuben County, where 
the previous year he had bought ninety-five acres in 
Otsego Township. He at once busied himself with 
its clearing and improvement, put up good buildings, 
ditched the low ground, and successfully followed 
farming and stock raising there until the death of 
his wife in 1900. He then went to Oklahoma Terri- 
tory and proved up a quarter section of land in that 
part of the Southwest. He held his Oklahoma land 
until February, 191 9, when he sold out at a good 
profit. 

Mr. Walberry is a democrat in politics. He was 
elected trustee of Otsego Township on an inde- 



pendent ticket in 1880. He is a member of the 
Grange and has been interested in all matters per- 
taining to the welfare of his community. 

December 22, 1867, at Woodville, Ohio, he mar- 
ried Miss Sarah Rhinehart, of Ottawa County in 
that state. She died in 1900, the mother of four 
children. Llewellyn, Perry O., Anna Bell and 
Roscoe Conklin. 

Charles W. Austin. The Austin family have 
kept their home and interests quite well concen- 
trated in Milford Township through a period of 
nearly eighty years. It is one of the oldest and 
best known families of LaGrange County. One of 
them, Charles W. Austin, has passed the age of 
three quarters of a century, but is still actively en- 
ga.ged in looking after his farm in section 21 of 
Milford Township, 2}/4 miles north and ^ of a mile 
east of South Milford. 

He was born in section 31 of the same township, 
January 14, 1842, a son of John W. and Louisa 
(Fathergillj Austin. His father was a native of 
Maryland and was one of the first settlers in Mil- 
ford Township. The Fathergill family also came at 
an early date to LaGrange County, and located in 
Springfield Township. Louisa Fathergill was a na- 
tive of Ohio and was reared and married in Spring- 
field Township. Both parents spent their last years 
on a farm in section 31, where they owned eighty 
acres. They were members of the Methodist 
Church and the father was a republican. Of five 
children, three are still living: Charles W. ; Albert, 
a farmer in Milford Township; and Dora, widow of 
F. L. Racine, of Fort Wayne. 

Charles W. Austin grew up in section 31, attended 
the district schools in winter and worked on the 
farm in summer, and at the age of twenty-one 
bought land and became a practical farmer, a voca- 
tion he has followed ever since. He now has a 
place of forty acres devoted to general farming and 
stock raising. 

August 15, 1862, he married lea L. McGowen. 
She was born in Morrow County, Ohio, September 
20, 1847, and spent two years of her girlhood in 
Iowa and after that settled with her family in Mil- 
ford Township. Mr. and Mrs. Austin have six liv- 
ing children : Rose, wife of Charles Grim, of Ken- 
dallville ; Fred H., of Kendallville; Frank, at home; 
Grace, wife of Zofer Sherman; Floyd, of Milford 
Township; and Dora, wife of S. D. Vesey, of Mil- 
ford Township. Mr. Austin is a republican in 
political affiliations. 

Ira T. Bachelor. One of the oldest and most 
substantial American communities in Steuben County 
is in Millgrove Township, where a preponderance of 
the early settlers were New England people, par- 
ticularly from Vermont. Members of the Bachelor 
family have been identified with that section over 
eighty years, and one of the best known is Ira T. 
Bachelor. 

Mr. Bachelor was born in Jackson Township of 
Steuben County, August 14. 1853. His grandparents 
were Ira and Hannah (Green) Bachelor. They had 
two children, Amos and Lucy. Ira Bachelor died 
in Ohio, and after his death his widow became Mrs. 
Elijah Owen. By that marriage there were three 
children: Henry, Ira and Hannah. Elijah Owen 
brought his family to Steuben County in 1836, mak- 
ing the trip from Ohio with ox team and wagon, 
and they were among the first settlers of Millgrove 
Township. 

Amos Bachelor was eleven years old when brought 
to Indiana. He was born in Lake County, Ohio, in 
April. 1825. He married Susan Burroughs, who 
was born in New York State December 10, 1828, a 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



daughter of Rev. Truman Burroughs. Her father 
was a pioneer Baptist minister who carried the gos- 
pel through several counties in Indiana and Mich- 
igan. 

Amos Bachelor began his career as a farmer in 
Jackson Township, and in 1857 came to Millgrove 
Township. In May, 1869, he left the farm and lived 
at Waterloo until March, 1874, in order to give his 
children the advantage of high school. With that 
exception he spent all his active career on the farm 
in Millgrove Township. In the fall of 1899 he 
retired from farming and moved to Angola, where 
he died January 29, 1905. His widow passed away 
in June, 1911. 

Amos Bachelor was one of the highly successful 
farmers of Steuben County, and at one time owned 
over 500 acres of productive land. He and his 
wife had four children: Ellen, who is the wife of 
James Campbell and lives at Waterloo ; Ira, Fre- 
mont and Elmer. 

Ira Bachelor in his individual career has mani- 
fested many of the good business qualities of his 
father. He acquired a good education, partly in 
the district schools of Jamestown Township, also in 
the high school at Waterloo, and for three terms he 
taught school. He has many talents and gifts in 
music. He began his farming career in Millgrove 
Township, where he has lived for over thirty years. 
He owns a farm of 185 acres, and all its substantial 
buildings were put on the land by him with the ex- 
ception of one house. 

Mr. Bachelor married in 1873 Miss Etta Patter- 
son, daughter of William Patterson. They have 
three children : Clyde, lo, wife of Fred Terry, and 
Paul. 

Theodore Hunt. The passing years have dealt 
pleasantly with Theodore Hunt, one of the prosper- 
ous farmers of Franklin Township, DeKalb County. 
He has lived in DeKalb County most of his life, 
has worked hard for his prosperity, and enjoys high 
standing as a citizen and has a happy family around 
him. 

Mr. Hunt, whose sixty-eight acre farm devoted to 
general crops and livestock is six miles north of But- 
ler and near the Town of Hamilton, was born at 
Fostoria, Ohio, October 9, 1864, a son of Theodore 
and Harriet H. (Boughton) Hunt. His father was 
born near Fostoria and his mother was a native 
of Connecticut, coming when a girl with her parents 
to Seneca County, Ohio. In 1867 the Hunt family 
moved to Williams County, Ohio, locating five miles 
northwest of Bryan. In 1877 they settled in Frank- 
lin Township of DeKalb County, but after several 
years sold their property and returned to Bryan 
for about two and a half years. They then resumed 
their residence in Franklin Township, where the 
father and mother spent their last years. They were 
active members of the Methodist Church and the 
father was a worker in the Grange and was a past 
grand and member of the Grand Lodge of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he 
was a stanch republican. He and his wife have eight 
children : Ellen and H. B., both deceased ; Emma, 
wife of John Hinkle; Mary, deceased wife of Ed 
Hinkle; Theodore; Hattie, wife of Arthur Oberlin; 
Eben; and Jennie, wife of Oren Aldrich. 

Mr. Theodore Hunt was about thirteen years old 
when his parents first came to Franklin Township. 
He completed his education in the district schools, 
and after the age of nineteen began his independent 
career. On December 31, 1883, he married Belle 
Taylor, daughter of Jasper S. Taylor. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hunt have three children : Grace, wife of 



Bert Oren; Ida, wife of Guy Obl>endorph ; and 
Ralph T., who makes his home with his father. 

Mr. Hunt is affiliated with Hamilton Lodge No. 
648 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a 
past grand, and he and his wife are both members 
of the Rebekahs. Politically he is a republican. 

Charles Black. It was not altogether personal 
popularity nor partisan strength that resulted in the 
choice of Charles Black for sheriff of Noble County 
at the general election of November, 1918. Mr. 
Black has exceptional qualifications for any posi- 
tion to which he might aspire. He has been a resi- 
dent of Noble County practically all his life, is a 
sturdy and thorough farmer, and bought and sold 
stock for a number of years and has been direct- 
ing the management of a good farm right up to 
the date he assumed the duties of his office. 

Mr. Black was born in York Township October 
18, 1871, son of John W. and Matilda (Tyler) Black. 
His parents were both born in Stark County, Ohio. 
The father was born October 16, 1837- They were 
married in that county, and about the close of the 
Civil war moved to Noble County, Indiana. After 
a few years in York Township as a renter John W. 
Black bought a farm, and at the time of his death 
owned 156 acres. He was a republican, quite active 
in his party, and served at one time as assessor of 
York Township. In his family were twelve children, 
five of whom are still living : John W.. a resident 
of Canton, Ohio ; Emmett, a farmer in York Town- 
ship ; Charles ; Calvin, of York Township ; and Jen- 
nie, wife of Da, -id Young, of LaGrange County, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Charles Black grew up in York Township and 
attended school in winter and worked on the farm 
in summer. At the age of twenty-one he left home 
and spent three years in Illinois, and on returning 
to Noble County he and his brother bought ninety 
acres in York Township and farmed it in partner- 
ship for five years. Mr. Black then sold his in- 
terest to his brother and on March 7, 1912, he 
moved to Albion and engaged in the business of 
buying and shipping livestock. He lived on his 
farm three miles southwest of Albion and also has 
a residence in the Town of Albion. He is a stock- 
holder in the Albion Grist Mill. Mr. Black has 
been active in republican politics for a number 
of years. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
and he and his family attend worship in the Pres- 
bj'terian Church of York Township. 

October 17, 1901, he married Miss Lulu A. Moore. 
Mrs. Black died October 9, 1916, the mother of 
two sons, Clarence G. and Charles D. On February 
28, 1918, Mr. Black married Mrs. Gail Frazure. 

Noah S. Stump. For nearly forty years the 
Stump family have been factors in the agricultural 
development and business and civic enterprise of 
Washington Township in Noble County. Noah S. 
Stump, who came to that locality when he was a 
boy. is a farm owner, farmer and stock raiser in 
section 22. 

He was born in Jackson Township of Elkhart 
Cnuntv. Indiana, December 7, 187,1. son of Noah 
and Maria CHettzel) Stump, the former a native 
of Canada and the latter of Pennsylvania. The 
Stump and Hettzel families came to Indiana in 
early days and Noah and Maria were married here, 
after which they settled four and a half miles 
southwest of Paris, Indiana, and from there in 1880, 
after selling their farm, went to the western 
frontier in Nebraska, but after a brief experience 
returned to Indiana and then bought land in Wash- 
ington Township of Noble County. Both parents 



138 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



spent the rest of their lives in this county, where 
the father died in igi2, and the mother in May, 
1917. They were active members of the River 
Brethren Church. A brief record of their large 
family of twelve children is as follows : Daniel D., 
a former county commissioner of Noble County; 
Anna, deceased; Adam, of Washington Township; 
Susan, of Kosciusko County; Mary, wife of Marion 
S. Weigle, of Washington Township; John B., of 
Washington Township ; Fannie, wife of Lewis C. 
Hontz ; Noah S. ; Frank, of Monroe, Michigan; 
Levi, deceased; James, of Columbia City; and 
George, of Washington Township. 

Noah S. Stump was seven years old when his 
parents came to Washington Township, and in 
addition to the advantages of the district schools 
attended the Tri-State College at Angola and has a 
term or so of teaching to his credit. On December 
30, iSgg, he married Aldine Hontz. She was born 
in Noble County, August 26, 1872, and is a daughter 
of Jacob Hontz. Mr. and Mrs. Stump have three 
children : Earl, a graduate of the common schools 
and with three years of attendance at high school, 
is unmarried and is still at home; Jennie is a gradu- 
ate of the common schools and attending high 
school; and Paul is still in the district school. 

Mrs. Stump is a member of the Baptist Church. 
He is a past grand of Lodge No. 722 of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, is a member of the 
Grand Lodge, and is past chief patriarch of the 
Encampment. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Rebekahs and she is a past grand of that order. 
He is also affiliated with Cromwell Lodge No. 
705, Free and Accepted Masons. Politically, Mr. 
Stump is a democrat. The farm which he conducts 
with so much profit comprises 147 acres. One phase 
of his efforts there is the breeding of registered 
hogs. He is a stockholder and director in the Sparta 
State Bank at Cromwell and is also a stockholder in 
the Farmers National Life Insurance Company. 

Frederick E. Sheoyer. who in his early life was 
a successful teacher, has been equally successful 
as a practical farmer. He is one of the best known 
men of Milford Township in LaGrange County, 
where he is the present township trustee. 

Mr. Shroyer was born in Orange Township of 
Noble County, Indiana, August 23, 1882, a son of 
William F. and Florence (Reinoehl) Shroyer. His 
father was born in the same township of the county 
April 30, 1861, a son of Edward and Mary (Swine- 
hart") Shroyer, both natives of Ohio, who came to 
Noble County in early days and settled in Orange 
Township. William F. Shroyer now lives near Hel- 
mer, Indiana, an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, an Odd Fellow and a democrat in 
political affiliations. He and his wife had three 
children, one of whom died in infancy. The two 
sons are Frederick E. and John F. The latter is a 
graduate of the Bushy Prairie High School, gradu- 
ated from Business College in Fort Wayne, and is a 
farmer in DeKalb County. 

Frederick E. Shroyer grew up on a farm in 
Orange Township of Noble County and received his 
first advantages in the district schools there. He 
also graduated from high school, attended the' State 
Normal at Terre Haute, Indiana, and spent one year 
in the State L'niversity at Bloomington. Mr. Shroyer 
was a teacher in the common schools for seven 
years and for two years in high school. September 
12, 1907, he married Inez Miibourn. She is also a 
graduate of the high scliool at South Milford and 
for four years taught there, being the primary 
teacher in South Milford. They have two children, 
Harold E., born October 21, 1910, and Mildred I., 
born January 16, 1914. 



The Shroyer family are members of the Christian 
Church at Stroh, Indiana. He is affiliated with 
Philo Lodge No. 672 of Masons, and in politics is a 
democrat. Before entering upon his duties as town- 
ship trustee he served four years as township as- 
sessor, from January i, 1915, to January i, 1919. 
Mr. Shroyer is a general farmer and stock raiser, 
having 136 acres in Milford Township under his 
management. 

Robert H. Snowberger, one of the successful 
farmers and landowners of Northeast Indiana, was 
a veteran of the Civil war, and for over half a cen- 
tury has been identified with different agricultural 
communities in Steuben and DeKalb counties. 

He comes from a family of well known promi- 
nence in this section of Indiana, being a son of 
David and Evelyn (Haughey) Snowberger. Some 
of the other details of the family history are found 
on other pages. 

Robert H. Snowberger was born in Ashland 
County, Ohio, December 19, 1845, but grew up in 
Steuben County, acquiring his education in the Cali- 
fornia district school in Steuben Township. He was 
not yet eighteen years of age when on August 4, 
1863, he enlisted in Company D of the Seventh In- 
diana Cavalry. He was in service for more than two 
years, receiving his honorable discharge February 
2, 1866. He participated in the campaign in Missis- 
sippi, involving the battles of Okolona and Guntown, 
and saw much other active service. After his return 
from the army Mr. Snowberger did some ditching 
work for a year and a lialf, then bought a small 
stretch of land in Steuben Township, a few years 
later moved to DeKalb County, and remained there 
a year and a half, again moved to Steuben Town- 
ship and then located on the farm where he had 
previously lived in DeKalb County, and remained 
there nine years. His next place was a farm of 200 
acres in Pleasant Township of Steuben County, and 
that was his home and the scene of his activities 
for the next twenty-nine years. After leaving there 
Mr. Snowberger and his family lived in Angola for 
a year, and in March, 1918, he moved to his present 
place in Jamestown Township. His efforts have 
been prospered, and at the present time he owns 
about 359 acres in Pleasant and Jamestown town- 
ships. 

Mr. Snowberger is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. He married in 1867 Maria Lacey, 
daughter of Thomas Lacey. Some of the records 
of the Lacey family are found on other pages. 

Mrs. Snowberger, who died in 1909, was the 
mother of five children, the first two dying in in- 
fancy. Those living are : Gary M. a dentist at Hud- 
son ; Grace A. the wife of Homer Brown; and Fred 
who also follows the profession of dentistry. Mr. 
Snowberger married for his second wife Mrs. Clara 
Baker. 

James C. DeVinney. While much of his time is 
spent away from LaGrange County in handling his 
business as a traveling salesman, James C. DeVinney 
is a member of an old and well known family of 
this part of Northeast Indiana, and owns an exten- 
sive and well arranged farm in Van Buren Town- 
ship. 

He was born in Newbury Township of LaGrange 
County November 28, 1858, a son of Dennis and 
Lauretta (Dibble) DeVinney. His father was a 
native of Pennsylvania. Lauretta Dibble was born 
in New York State, a daughter of Volney C. and 
Hannah Fidelia (Parker) Dibble. Volney Dibble 
was born in the same state January 7, 1808, a son of 
Andrew Dibble, and came to Lima, Indiana, in 1843, 
and conducted a wagon making shop there until 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



139 



1859. He then moved to a farm in Elkhart County, 
later established his home in Newbury Township 
of LaGrange County, and continued farming until 
1871. After that he spent four years in DeKalb 
County, and in 1876 moved to the farm now owned 
by James C. DeVinney in Van Buren Township, in 
section 32. He lived there until his death in 1901. 
He was a good mechanic and a capable farmer and 
a man whose relations with tlie community gave 
him a place of special prominence. Volney C. Dibble 
had three children : Hannah, Lauretta and Adel- 
bert. 

Dennis DeVinney came to LaGrange County when 
a young man, and after his marriage worked in the 
wagon shop with Mr. Dibble. Subsequently he was 
a farmer in Newbury Township, and he died in 
1863, when a comparatively young man. His wife 
had passed away in 1862. Their children were: 
Charles A., who lives in DeKalb County, and by his 
marriage to Emma Treman had three children, 
Laura, Clair, who died at the age of two years, and 
George. James C. is the second child. Ida L. L. 
is' the widow of Charles Weiss, who died April 2, 
1915, and her children are Lola Fidelia, Henry C, 
E. Eugene, Earl C, and Ruth, who died when four 
and a half years old. 

James C. DeVinney, who is popularly known as 
Mont DeVinney, was left an orphan when about 
five years of age, and he and his brother and sister 
were reared by their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dibble. He attended public school in Newbury and 
\'an Buren townships, also the Normal School at 
LaGrange. and taught seven terms of school. For 
over two years he clerked in a store at Howe, Indi- 
ana, and then took up his work as a traveling sales- 
man, which he followed for seven years. From 1892 
to 1907 he was in the general merchandise business 
at Howe. He sold out in 1907 and spent the follow- 
ing two years repairing and working the home farm. 
Since 1909 he has had a general agency for the 
well known Kalamazoo tile and wood silos. He sup- 
ervises the sale of these silos in fifteen counties in 
Northern Illinois. 

Mr. DeVinney owns the fine i7S-acre farm in 
\'an Buren Township where his widowed sister and 
her family reside. When he is not looking after 
his business affairs in Illinois he makes his home 
with his sister on the farm. Mr. DeVinney is un- 
married. 

He served as trustee of Lima Township four 
years and for three years was manager of the Lima 
Creamery. Mr. DeVinney is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge" at Howe and with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at LaGrange, 
and is a member of the Presbyterian Church at 
Howe. 

R.WMOND J. LusE. There are a number of illus- 
trations of men who have gone from the farm into 
commercial and professional careers. The cases 
are not so numerous where young professional men 
have given up their chosen work to devote them- 
selves to agriculture. A case in point is that of 
Raymond J. Luse, who enjoyed high standing as a 
physician and surgeon in Steuben County and a few 
years ago surrendered his practice and has made 
unequivocal success at dairy farming. 

Doctor Luse was born at Niles, Ohio, March 13, 
1880, son of Jesse B. and Frances (Sanderson) Luse, 
the former a native of Niles and the latter of 
Youngstown, Ohio. His father is still engaged in 
farming near the industrial city of Niles. 

Dr. Raymond J. Luse grew up on his father's 
farm and in early life acquired some of the experi- 
ence and training which has fitted him for success 



since lie entered dairying. He was educated in the 
common and high schools of Niles, and first came 
to Northeastern Indiana as a student in the Normal 
College of Angola. He graduated in 1900 and in 
1902 entered the school of medicine of Drake Uni- 
versity of Des Moines, Iowa, graduating in the 
year 1906. He at once returned to Angola, and took 
up the practice of medicine, which he continued suc- 
cessfully for seven years. Mr. Luse left his profes- 
sion in 191 3, and then moved to his farm one mile 
west of Angola. He has acquired a splendid herd 
of blooded Holsteins, noted for their milk produc- 
tion, and keeps twenty cows for his siilendid busi- 
ness of dairy farming. Doctor Luse married in 1007 
Clela Powers, daughter of Judge Powers, of Angola. 
They have two children : Raymond Powers and 
.^nna. Doctor and Mrs. Luse are members of the 
Christian Church. • 

Charles W. Dancer. M. D., who has practiced 
medicine and surgery at Stroh for the past eighteen 
years,, comes of a well known family of professional 
and business men in LaGrange County. 

He is a son of Dr. John and Isabelle (Hodges) 
Dancer and w^s born at South Milford, November 
29, 1871. His father became well known all over 
Northeast Indiana. He was a native of Stark Coun- 
ty. Ohio, and spent most of his boyhood in DeKalb 
County, Indiana. He graduated from Rush Medical 
College in Chicago and for nearly half a century 
practiced his profession at South Milford, in an ever 
growing circle of esteem. He was a member ofthe 
Masonic Lodge, Chapter and Commanderj', at Ken- 
dallville, and a democrat in politics. He served two 
or three terms as trustee of Milford Township. 
Doctor Dancer and wife had ten children, six of. 
whom are still living: Maggie, wife of Ephraim 
Frandt; Katie J., widow of Dr. H. M. Newman, of 
South Milford; Dr. Charles W. : Edna, wife of 
Dallas West, a chemist with the Wabash Portland 
Cement Company at Stroh ; George W., a dentist at 
Dayton, Ohio ; and Jesse E., an interurban railway 
conductor with home at Fort Wayne. 

Dr. Charles W. Dancer grew up in South Milford, 
attended the public schools there, and in 1893 gradu- 
ated from St. Mary's College at Dayton, Ohio. 
From i8<i5 to 1898 he was a student in Rush Medical 
College, his father's alma mater, and took his degree 
in medicine from the Tennessee Medical College in 
1899. The following year he located at Stroh, and 
has since liad a busy town and country practice. He 
is a member in good standing of the County and 
State Medical societies, is a democrat and has served 
as county chairman of Lafirange County four years. 
He has also been a trustee of Milford Township 
and a few years ago was nominated for the State 
Senate on the democratic ticket. In a district 
normally republican by 2.500 he was defeated by 
only 800 votes. Dr. Dancer is a charter member and 
was the first master of Philo Lodge No. 672, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Mason, and is affiliated with the 
Royal .'\rch Chapter and Knight Templar Com- 
mandery at Kcndallville. He has also passed the 
chairs in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Improved Order of Red Men. Doctor Dancer 
married Eliz;abeth Weingart in 1908. 

George M. Maxahan has lived a life of unusual 
experience and has had his home and work in a 
number of different environments. In early life he 
was thrown upon his own responsibilities, had to 
work for himself and others, too, but in the course 
of thirty years has accumulated a generous pros- 
perity and is now one of the leading farmers and 
farm owners in Jackson Township of Steuben 
County. 



140 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



He was born in Ottawa County, Ohio, December 
26, 1865. His parents were Ira and Nancy 
(Weatherwax) Manahan. His paternal grandfather, 
Samuel Manahan, was a farmer in Ottawa County, 
Ohio, and had a family of children named Rebecca, 
Elizabeth, James, William, Samuel, Ira, Jefferson, 
Thomas and Joseph. 

Ira Manahan was also born in Ottawa County, 
Ohio, October 9, 1836, and on March I, 1863, married 
Nancy Weatherwax. She was born August 28, 1842, 
a daughter of Lawrence and Nancy Maria 
(Weatherwax) Weatherwax. Lawrence was born 
October 3, 1813, and Nancy Maria, March I, 1821. 
In the Weatherwax family were six children : 
Elizabeth, born June 13, 1838; Lydia, born April 2, 
1840; Nancy, born August 28, 1842; John, who died 
in infancy; Maria Jane, born July 18, 1855; and 
Martha, born July 2$, 1859. 

Ira Manahan during his active life was a farmer 
in Ottawa County, Ohio. He died there October 
16, 1872, when his son George was only seven years 
old. After his death his wife and children continued 
to live on the home farm some eight or ten years, 
and the family then came to Pleasant Township of 
Steuben County. Mrs. Manahan bought a farm of 
fifty acres about two miles west of Angola, and 
lived on that place until 1892. She then went west 
to Adams County, Nebraska, and kept house for her 
two sons, Charles and Bert, and remained there 
until the marriage of her son Charles, since which 
time she has resumed her residence in Steuben 
County and now lives at Angola. She was the 
mother of a family of five: Samuel L., born July 
10, 1864; George M., whose birth has above been 
noted; Minnie Jane, born October 30, 1867, wife 
of Edward Baker ; Charles W., born October -24, 
1869; and Bert I., born September 22, 1871. 

George M. Manahan acquired most of his edu- 
cation in his native county of Ohio, but also at- 
tended district schools in Pleasant Township. He 
was only thirteen years old when he became a 
wage earner, working out at $10 a month. His 
career as an independent farmer was begun in 1888 
in Pleasant Township on a rented farm. After a 
year and a half he moved to Jackson Township, 
continued farming there until 1894, and then spent 
a year as a farmer in Nebraska. After returning 
to Steuben County he located in Pleasant Town- 
ship and for fifteen years lived on various places 
and made a number of moves, though most of the 
time he was a farmer. He has owned several dif- 
ferent farms and has been a permanent resident 
of Jackson Township since 191 1, when he bought 
his present place. The prosperity gained by years 
of effort is represented in the ownership of 265 
acres, with building improvements of exceptional 
value. 

Mr. Manahan married Nellie R. Moore, a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Rachel A. Moore. They have 
two children: Glenn L., who married Hilda Leese; 
and Esther C. 

George F. Praul. One of the most complete and 
modern farms in DeKalb County is the Maple Lawn 
Farm, a mile and a half north of Butler in Franklin 
Township. Its proprietor is George F. Praul, and 
on the land which he cultivates today he was born 
November 19, 1869. 

He is a son of Edwin A. and Sarah A. (Firestone) 
Praul, both of whom were also natives of Franklin 
Township, the father born December 15, 1848, and the 
mother September 13, 1851. The paternal grand- 
parents were Edward and Lucy (Thompson) Praul, 
the former a native of Pennsyivania while the latter 
was born in Greene County, New York, March 16, 
1817. They were married in New York, moved from 



there to Pennsylvania and then to Indiana in 184S, 
locating in Wilmington Township and later in Frank- 
lin Township, where they spent the rest of their 
lives. Lucy Praul died March 13, 1885, while he died 
July 4, 1863, his death being the result of a rattle- 
snake bite. Of their twelve children five are still 
living, named Lucinda, wife of Nick Bucher, of 
Cincinnati; Nancy, widow of Benjamin Walton, of 
Garrett; Hattie, wife of Charles Thompson; Min- 
nie, widow of Watson Halabaugh ; and Rachel, 
widow of Henry Workman. 

Edwin Praul grew up in DeKalb County in a lo- 
cality and under circumstances which prevented him 
from getting a good education. On July 3, 1868, 
he married Sarah A. Firestone, who was one of thir- 
teen children, five of whom are still living. 

George F. Praul was the only child of his parents 
and he has spent practically all his life on the 
home farm. As a boy there he attended the common 
schools. On December 27, 1893, he married Mar- 
garet A. McClintock. She was born in Troy Town- 
ship, DeKalb County, February 18, 1873, a daughter 
of Jeremiah and i\lary (Scott) McClintock. Her 
father was a native of Perry County, Pennsylvania, 
and her mother of Crawford County, Ohio. They 
were married in Ohio and in 1867 came to Indiana. 
Jeremiah McClintock was a Union soldier, having 
served three years in Company K of the Ninth Ohio 
Cavalry. In later years he was active in the Grand 
Army of the Republic and was an influential mem- 
ber of the republican party. In the McClintock fam- 
ily were four children, three of whom are still living: 
Elias, of Auburn ; Margaret and Mattie, wife of 
Vernon L. Kepler, of Troy Township. Mrs. Praul 
received her education in the common schools of 
Troy Township. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Praul lived 
on a rented farm two and a half years, then spent 
six years at Butler, and with that exception they 
have lived on the old homestead. Mr. Praul has 
sixty acres of good farm land and he is also one 
of the directors of the Butler Farmers Elevator 
Company and a stockholder in the Arctic Cooperative 
Livestock Association. He has been active in the 
republican party and he and his wife are members 
of the Wilmington Grange. Both are affiliated with 
the Pythian Sisters, Mrs. Praul being past chief 
and a member of the Grand Lodge. His membership 
is with Butler Lodge No, 158, Knights of Pythias. 
Mrs. Praul is a Methodist. 

They have three children : Sherley E. is a grad- 
uate of high school, also took advanced training at 
Winona and Angola, and for three years was a 
teacher. She is now the wife of Clarence T. Car- 
son, and lives in Chicago. Bessie G. is a high school 
graduate, wife of D. A. Baker, of Butler. Russell 
E., the youngest, is still at home and attending school. 

Orla L. Fast. Bearing a name that has long 
been honored in the citizenship of Steuben County, 
Orla L. Fast has added credit to the name and 
is now holding one of the responsible offices of the 
county, as trustee of Pleasant Township. Mr. Fast 
has lived at Angola since he left his farm about 
ten years ago. 

He was born in Pleasant Township, Steuben 
Countv. July 17, 1867. a son of Christian and Rhoda 
M. (Wells) Fast. His grandparents were Martin 
and Catherine (Blosser) Fast, of Pennsylvania. In 
1816 they moved to Ashland County. Ohio, the total 
population of which then consisted of nine families. 
Catherine Fast for three months never saw the face 
of a white woman. The countv settled rapidly after 
they came, and Martin and Catherine spent their last 
years with every comfort of civilization. They 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



141 



reared a family of seven children, named John, 
Anna, Eli. Mary, Jacob, Christian and Elijah. 

Christian Fast was born in Fayette County, Penn- 
sylvania, February 12, 1814, and from the age of 
two years lived in the pioneer surroundings of Ash- 
land County, where he farmed for several years. 
In 1852 he brought his family to Steuben County, 
and secured l5o acres in Pleasant Township. Only 
four acres had been cleared. Twenty acres he re- 
served as a timber lot, but all the rest gradually 
came under cultivation, and he earned an abundant 
prosperity. He died December 13, 1898. In 1839 
he married Henrietta Sowle, who was born in 
Oneida County. New York, in 1820, daughter of 
Joseph and Rachel (Allen) Sowle. She died in 
December, 1859, mother of the following children: 
Joseph J.; Rosanna, who married Alonzo Burlin- 
game ; Mary, whose husband was Orville Goodale; 
Francis Allen; Eli; Rachel, who became the wife 
of Melville McGrew ; John A., who died young; 
and Henrietta. Christian Fast married for his sec- 
ond wife Rhoda M. Wells, who was born in Wayne 
County, Ohio, December 12, 1837, daughter of Loton 
and Anna M. (Sowle) Wells. To the second mar- 
riage were born: Elmer, who died in infancy; Ira 
C. ; Orla L. ; and Laura, who died aged nine years. 
Christian Fast was a justice of the peace many 
years, and was a member of the Christian Church. 

Orla L. Fast, after getting his education in the 
district schools of Pleasant Township, took charge 
of his father's farm, and from the age of twenty- 
one handled it independently and planted and har- 
vested crops there every season until 1910, when he 
left the farm and moved to Angola. In the county 
seat he was for two years engaged in the draying 
business. He was elected trustee of Pleasant Town- 
ship in 1914, and in 1918 the citizens set the seal of 
their approval upon his capable administration by 
returning him for a second term of four years. 
He is a popular member of the Masonic and Odd 
Fellows lodges, and is a member of the Christian 
Church. 

Mr. Fast married Miss Catherine Penner, daugh- 
ter of Martin and Elizabeth Penner. Their family 
consists of five children, named Paul A., Mildred A., 
."Krline, Hershel and Henrietta. 

MiLO R. Jones has been a prominent citizen of 
Orange Township, Noble (Tounty, for many years, 
is a native of that township, and his family were 
established in this section of Indiana at a pioneer 
date. Mr. Jones is prominent in local affairs and 
is the present assessor of his township. 

He was born January 30. 1854, son of George R. 
and Hannah E. (Hunter) Jones. His father was 
a native of New York State and his mother of 
Champaign County. Ohio. His grandfather, Milo 
Jones, came to LaGrange County, Indiana, as early 
as 1843, and a few years later moved to Noble 
County and settled in Orange Township. He lived 
to the age of eighty-five. The family were mem- 
bers of the Free Will Baptist Church, and the 
grandfather was a Mason and a republican and 
was active in politics, serving four years as trustee 
of Orange Township. 

Milo R. Jones was one of five children, one of 
whom died in infancy. He is the oldest of the 
four still living. His brother William O. is a re- 
tired farmer in Orange Township. Ichabod also 
lives in Orange Township and Lucy A. is the wife 
of John Taylor. 

Milo R. Jones grew up in Orange Township and 
lived with his grandfather to the age of twenty- 
one. He received a common school education. 
After reaching his majority he farmed the old 
homestead. 



June 4, 1876, he married Sallie A. Eddy. She 
died leaving two children : Grace, now the wife of 
Benjamin F. King, of Elkhart Township, and Enos 
M., who married Mildred Conklin. For his second 
wife Mr. Jones married Ella Kesler. She died in 
1900, without children. For his third wife he mar- 
ried Mrs. Ada E. Kesler, widow of Albert Kesler 
and daughter of Samuel Wolf. Mrs. Jones by her 
first husband has two children : Grover, who mar- 
ried Maude Hanes and lives in Noble Countv ; and 
Edith, a graduate of the Rome City High School 
and a graduate nurse of the Fletcher Sanitarium 
at Indianapolis. 

Mr. Jones is an active republican. He has served 
ten years in the office of township assessor and was 
reelected to that office November 5, 1918, for an- 
other term of four years. As a farmer he cultivates 
eighty acres of the rich and productive soil of 
Orange Township, his home being in section 9. 

Guy K. Friend. Though born over the state line 
in Branch County, Michigan, Guy K. Friend has 
spent most of his life in Steuben County, grew up on 
a farm, and has found in farming a congenial and 
profitable vocation through which he has expressed 
his best service to himself and the world. 

Mr. Friend, who is owner of one of the good 
farms of Millgrove Township, was born in Noble 
Township of Branch County July 30, 1870, a son 
of Jefferson L. and Nancy (Kidder) Friend. Jef- 
ferson L. Friend was a native of Stark County, 
Ohio, grew up in Williams County, Ohio, served 
as a soldier in the Union Army, and a few years 
after the war uought a farm in Millgrove Town- 
ship which had been originally settled and cleared 
by his wife's father, Alanson Kidder, a pioneer of 
1836 in Steuben County and a member of the orig- 
inal Vermont colony at Orland. 

Guy K. Friend acquired his education in Orland, 
including his high school course, and for several 
years was associated with his brother Morton in 
running his home farm. In 1901 he bought a place 
in section 29 of Millgrove Township a half mile 
south of Orland, but after four years sold out and 
bought his present farm of 224 acres in section 16. 
Since then he has improved the place with build- 
ings and other facilities, and his surroundings indi- 
cate every degree of prosperity. 

December 25, 1892, Mr. Friend married Emma B. 
Barber, a daughter of William and Sidney (Slay- 
baugh) Barber, and a sister of W. S. Barber. Mr. 
and Mrs. Friend are members of the Congrega- 
tional Church at Orland. 

George A. Wagner for a number of years has been 
identified in a progressive and enterprising way with 
the agricultural affairs of Franklin Township, De- 
Kalb County, is a native of that township, but for a 
considerable period of his lifetime lived in the West 
and laid the basis of his fortune as a farmer there. 

He was born in Franklin Township September 7, 
1867, a son of Fred and Maria (Healy) Wagner. 
His father was born in Germany February 14, 1834, 
was educated there, and at the age of twenty came 
to the United States and settled in Ohio and later 
moved to DeKalb County. He married in DeKalb 
County and then settled on a farm in Franklin Town- 
ship, where he lived out his industrious career until 
his death on August 2, 1902. His widow survived 
him until February 8, 1914. He was a Dunkard in 
religion and a democrat in politics. There were six 
children: Lena, wife of J. E. Firestone; Ada, wife 
of John Rohrbaugh ; George A. ; Cora, wife of Ora 
Hiner; Essie, wife of Luther Brvan; and Jesse, of 
Butler. 



142 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



George A. Wagner grew up in Franklin Township. 
He was educated in the district schools and at the 
age of nineteen left home and went out to the states 
of Nebraska and Kansas, where he spent altogether 
thirteen years. He acquired a quarter section home- 
stead and after developing and improving that bought 
i6o acres more. After selling his lands in the West 
he returned to DeKalb County and bought the forty 
acre farm where he lives today. 

In 1904 Mr. Wagner married Kate Chambers. 
She was born in Wisconsin May 10, 1864, but came 
to Indiana with her parents at the age of six years 
and was reared in Steuben County, attending school 
at Fremont. She was one of the nine children, seven 
of whom are still living, of Nicholas and Mary J. 
(Noyes) Chambers. 

Mr. Wagner is a past grand of Butler Lodge No. 
282 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is 
also a member of the Encampment, and he and his 
wife are affiliated with the Rebekah Lodge at Butler. 
They are also members of the Wilmington Grange, 
of which he is a past master. For some years he 
has been prominent in the democratic party in De- 
Kalb County, has served as a member of the election 
board and has also been a township supervisor. He 
is a trustee of the Odd Fellows Lodge at Butler. 

Alfred Pendill for many years has been actively 
identified with the farming interests of Steuben 
County, where he was reared and educated, and has 
one of the well-improved places of Pleasant Town- 
ship. As a farmer he depends not only upon hard 
work but good judgment in handling his crops and 
marketing the products of the farm, and has every 
reason to be satisfied with the prosperity he has 
achieved. 

His father is Hiram J. Pendill, living on the same 
farm in Pleasant Township. Hiram J. Pendill was 
born in Union Township of Branch County, Michi- 
gan, August 21, 1837, son of James and Eliza 
(Wilder) Pendill, the former a native of Palmyra, 
New York, and the latter also a native of that state. 
James Pendill was one of the first settlers in Branch 
County, Michigan. It was a country of woods and 
prairies, and for a number of years he used his axe 
as diligently as he did his plow. He helped clear 
up that county and spent the rest of his life there 
as a farmer. His children by his first wife were 
Mary, Elijah, Hiram and Melvin. He married for 
his second wife Melvina Rice, and she had three 
children, Samuel, Louisa and James. James Pendill 
married for his third wife Mrs. Eliza Barnes. 

Hiram J. Pendill attended school_ in Branch 
County and when a young man was initiated into 
the business of farming. In February, 1861, he 
came to Mill Grove Township of Steuben County, 
and after five or six years working for others he 
engaged in farming for himself, and that continued 
his occupation for practically half a century. In 
1905 he moved to the farm of his son Alfred and 
has since lived there. 

Hiram Pendill married Sarah Hyzer. They had 
four children, Eva, Alfred, Ortensa and Frank. 

Alfred Pendill acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Millgrove Township. He learned 
farming under his father, was associated with the 
elder Pendill for a number of years, and since 190S 
has occupied his present home and farm in Pleasant 
Township. Alfred Pendill married Miss Ella 
Brown, now deceased. She was a daughter of Jerry 
and Margaret (Arnold) Brown. Mr. Pendill' is 
the father of four children: Eva M., wife of Asa 
Johnson; Earl, who married Nora Harter ; Robert 
R., who married Mina Sowle ; and William, whose 
wife was Elsie Stuttler. 



Dallas Wert is a member of an old and well 
known • family of Milford Township, LaGrange 
County, and his own career has been partly busi- 
ness and partly professional. He is now head 
chemist of the Wabash Portland Cement Company 
of Stroh. 

He was born on the old Wert farm in Milford 
Township, June 9, 1870, a son of Daniel and Eliza 
M. (Miller) Wert. Some of the important facts 
concerning his family are published on other pages. 
Dallas Wert, youngest of his father's children, 
grew up on a farm, attended the Center brick school 
in Milford Township, and took his college work 
in St. Mary's College at Dayton, Ohio, where he 
graduated with the degree Bachelor of Science. 
Later he was student in Purdue University, and 
at one time was a prescription drug clerk at Mil- 
ford. For four and a half years he was engaged 
in the furniture business, but in 1903 went with the 
Wabash Portland Cement Company as a chemist. 
In 1907 he was promoted to head chemist in charge 
of the laboratory, and has had supervision of the 
technical processes of manufacture in the plant at 
Stroh. 

March 18, 1897, Mr. Wert married Dee Edna 
Dancer, member of another well known family of 
LaGrange County. She was born at South Mil- 
ford and besides her education in the local schools 
she attended the Conservatory of Music, being also 
a vocal student of Hillsdale College of Michigan. 
They have three children : Bernard N., born Feb- 
ruary S, 1898, was in the Students' Army Training 
Corps at the University of Michigan and is now a 
student at St. Mary's College at Dayton. Ohio. The 
two younger children are Octa H. and Norma E., 
the former a student in the Kendallville High 
School and the latter in the grade schools at Stroh. 
Mr. Wert is affiliated with Philo Lodge _ No. 672, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and is a dem- 
ocrat in politics. 

Oliver M. Gramling is the prosperous owner of 
a 135-acre farm in Jackson Township of DeKalb 
County, has made most of his prosperity through 
his own efforts, and is one of the leading citizens 
of that community. He is a stock man and a 
breeder of high grade Durham cattle. 

Mr. Gramling, whose home is a mile and a half 
southwest of Auburn, was born in Smithfield Town- 
ship of DeKalb County May 12, 1864, a son of Peter 
and Lavinia (Meyers) Gramling. His father was 
born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1848, and his mother 
in York County, Pennsylvania, in 1842. They were 
married in Ohio and then came to Indiana and set- 
tled in Smithfield Township and spent the rest of 
their lives there. They were active members of the 
Barkers Chapel of the Methodist Church, and Peter 
Gramling was a republican. He served as postmas- 
ter at Summit, Indiana. In the family were eight 
children: Mary, wife of Thomas Lacy; Oliver M. ; 
Isaac S., a railroad man living at York, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Eleva, wife of Thad W. Thomas ; Lottie, 
wife of J. I. Farley, head salesman of the Auburn 
.Automobile Company; W. H., a farmer at Summit, 
Indiana; Carrie, wife of William Zurbrugg; and 
Richard A., of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Oliver M. Gramling and his family are mernbers 
of the Presbyterian Church at Auburn. He is a re- 
publican in politics. He married Miss Helen I. 
Shaffer, who was born in Union Township of De- 
Kalb County and is a graduate of the Auburn High 
School. They have three children : Lester S., born 
March i, igoi, a student in the Auburn High 
School; Frances L., born September 30, 1906; and 
Oliver H., born December 11, 1907. 




^c...^9trrhufA^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



143 



Daniel W. Weitz, who was through the Civil 
war as a Union soldier, has for half a century been 
an honored resident of Williams and DeKalb coun- 
ties, for more than fifty years being a farmer in 
Troy Township of the latter county. His home 
is a half mile west of Arctic. 

Mr. Weitz, who is also a justice of the peace, 
was born in Portage County, Ohio, June 7, 1840, 
son of Adam and Elizabeth (Veager) Weitz. His 
father was born at Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, in 
February, 1810, while the mother was born in Beaver 
County, Pennsylvania. They were married Septem- 
ber 17, 1839, at Franklin Mills in Portage County 
by B. F. Hopkins. They lived in Portage County 
for several years, and in 1846 became pioneers in 
Williams County, Ohio, where tliey spent the rest 
of their lives at Edgerton. Adam Weitz was reared 
a Catholic but later became a prominent member 
of the Methodist Church and founded the Weitz 
Methodist Episcopal Church in Williams County. 
He also look up democratic affiliation in politics 
but in 1856 joined the .newly established republican 
party. He held several township offices. He and 
his wife had a family of eleven children, nine of 
whom are still living: Daniel W.; John A., de- 
ceased ; Harriet ; Lucina and Lavina, twins ; Joseph ; 
Charles W. ; Thomas T. ; George A. ; Francis E. 
and William A., deceased. 

Daniel W. Weitz grew up on a farm in Williams 
County and acquired most of his education in school 
district Xo. 3 and in high school at Williams Cen- 
ter. He also made liberal use of his opportunities 
to study outside of school, and became a very suc- 
cessful teacher, a vocation he followed for about 
twenty years. Most of his teaching he did after 
the war. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H of 
the Third Ohio Cavalry, and was with that com- 
mand until the close of hostilities, being mustered 
out with the rank of first sergeant. Though he 
was never wounded nor taken prisoner he was con- 
fined to a hospital by illness for six months. 

After the war he returned to Williams County 
and on October 11, 1868, married Mary E. Bower- 
sox. She was born in St. Joe Township of Wil- 
liams County, being the first white girl born in 
that township. She was a sister of Judge C. A. 
Bowersox of Bryan, Ohio. In 1869, soon after their 
marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Weitz removed to Troy 
Township of DeKalb County, and have had their 
home there for over fifty years. He owns a farm 
of 130 acres. He was also the first president of the 
First National Bank of Butler, serving for three 
years,' then became the vice president and is now 
a stockholder of that bank. Mrs. Weitz died Sep- 
tember 9, 1902. Of their five children three are still 
living: Nellie, who is a graduate of the high school 
at Edgerton, Ohio, and Tri-State College at Angola, 
is the wife of Joseph R. Wiley ; Floy, who is a 
young woman of brilliant intellect and has spent 
twelve years as a teacher in Troy Township, is 
unmarried and lives at home with her father ; 
Charles H. is a graduate of the Butler High School 
and Purdue University, with a degree in civil en- 
gineering, and is now 'in business at Salt Lake City. 

Mr. Weitz is affiliated with Forest Lodge of Ma- 
sons at Butler, is a member of Aleade Post No. 
144 of the Grand Army of the Republic, and a re- 
publican in politics. He voted for Abraham Lincoln 
under a pine tree in 1864. He was then in Georgia 
in war service. He has served as a justice of the 
peace for about thirty years. During a residence 
in Edgerton, Ohio, he served as a member of the 
City Council and as City Solicitor. 

J. P. Cox. Steuben County furnishes not a few 
examples of men who have spent many years in 



busmess, trades and professions, and who for the 
settled years of their careers made a choice of farm- 
mg and country life. One of them is J. P. Cox, who 
however, was born and reared on a farm in Salem' 
Township, and after spending two decades at the 
pamter's trade bought back a portion of the property 
on which he spent his boyhood and is now success- 
fully engaged in raising corn and hogs and other 
crops. 

Mr. Cox was born in Salem Township April 17 
1866, a son of Eli D. and .Margaret (Eckerd) Cox 
and a grandson of Jacob and Ann (Denman) Cox. 
His grandparents were natives of Pennsylvania 
moving from that state to Ohio. Jacob Cox was a 
Wayne County farmer, and died there in 1881. His 
children were Eli D., Susan Ann, who married Se- 
bastian Eckerd, Andrew, Rebecca, who married Wes- 
ley Harper, Samuel, Alpheus and Freeman. 

Eli D. Cox was born in Sugar Creek Township 
ot Wayne County, Ohio, in i82v He married Mar- 
garet Eckerd in 1852. She was born in Germany 
in 1830, and her father, John Eckerd, came to Amer- 
ica with his family about the same year. In 1858, 
SIX years after his marriage, Eli D. Cox came to In- 
diana and located in section 32 of Salem Township, 
Steuben County. The eighty acres he bought at that 
time had two or three log buildings, but otherwise 
the work of clearing and cultivation had hardly 
begun. The subsequent condition of the farm rep- 
resented many years of hard labor on his part, and 
in the course of time he had a well won prosperity. 
In 1871 he built a large barn and in 1873 a fine resi- 
dence, and continued actively engaged in farming 
there until 1893. After that he lived retired in 
Hudson until his death on May 3, 1901. His widow 
survived him until January 26, 1913, being eighty- 
three years of age at the time of her death. Their 
children were : Mary Ellen, who died in childhood ; 
Jennie, who married Jacob Clinesmith ; William 
Franklin; Susannah, who married Rudolphus Fred- 
erick; Cora Etta, wife of George Clinesmith; J. P.; 
H. B. ; J. F., who died in childhood, and O. W. Cox. 

J. P. Cox acquired his early education in the 
Pleasant Ridge School House. At tlie age of twentj'- 
one he left the farm, where he had put in several 
years of work and gained a general knowledge of 
farming, to learn the painter's trade. He followed 
it actively for twenty years, nine years of the time 
being spent in Chicago. He gave up his vocation 
in 1905, and then bought a farm west of Kendallville, 
Indiana, living there a year. In 1905 also he bought 
his present place of eighty acres. The buildings on 
his farm are good ones and represent his work and 
investment since he became proprietor here. He is 
engaged in general farming, and keeps some excellent 
stock, and for the past five years has been rather 
extensively engaged in buying and shipping live- 
stock. At the present time Mr. Cox is manager of 
the Farmers Cooperative Shipping Association at 
Helmer. 

On October 29, 1899, he married Miss Alma Hen- 
ney, daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Shellenber- 
ger) Henney. They have three children : Harold J., 
born January 12, 1902; Deri E., born January 31, 
1904; and Hilda B., born September 2, 1909. 

Jacob Henney, father of Mrs. Cox, was born in 
Holmes County, Ohio. July 24, 1823, and in early 
manhood settled in DeKalb County, Indiana, on 
wild land, and developed a good farm. He died 
March 7, 1906. He married Catherine Shellenberger 
November 17, 1853, and their children, ten in num- 
ber, were : Amanda, James, David, Catherine, Albert, 
Jennie, Edward, Emma, Alma and Susie. James, 
Catherine and Albert are deceased. 



144 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



Leslie H. Green represents one of the capable 
younger generation of Steuben County farmers, a 
young man who has met the test of manhood and 
has proved worthy of the robe of citizenship and 
the responsibilities descended upon him from his 
father. 

Mr. Green, who operates the old Green homestead 
in Pleasant Township, was born in Scott Township 
of Steuben County, May 22, 1890, a son of the late 
Elmer A. Green, whose life record forrns the title 
of a sketch on another page of this publication. 

Mr. Green attended public schools in Scott and 
Pleasant townships and in March, 1912, at the age 
of twenty-two, began his serious career as a farmer. 
He has always lived on the old homestead and since 
his father's death in 1916 has had the active manage- 
ment of the farm of 146 acres owned by the 
widowed mother and her sons. He has nearly ten 
years of practical experience behind him, and that, 
supplemented with some sound native ability and a 
constant spirit of progress and study, fortifies him 
among the best farmers of Steuben County. 

Mr. Green married Grace Riggleman, a daughter 
of George and Orda (Reed) Riggleman. They have 
three children, Donald C, Dale and Marvin E. 

Oris D. Cannon is well known 'to the community 
of South Milford and all who sojourn within its 
limits as proprietor of the Hotel Cannon. He has 
been a successful business man, farmer and public 
official in that part of LaGrange County for many 
years. 

He was born in Wayne Township of Noble 
County, July 25, 1876, a son of William and Mary 
(Fink) Cannon. His mother was also a native of 
Wayne Township, and after their marriage they 
settled in Milford Township of LaGrange County, 
where they still live. William Cannon is affiliated 
with the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias 
and Red Men. and is a democrat in politics. There 
were three children: Oris D. ; Cora, unmarried 
and living at home; and Curtis, of Milford Town- 
ship. 

O. D. Cannon grew up on a farm in Wayne 
Township of Noble County. When he was two 
years old he was taken into the home of his grand- 
father, who gave him a good education in the dis- 
trict schools and also supplied him with the advan- 
tages of the Tri-State College at Angola. After his 
grandfather's death he continued to live with his 
grandmother, and after his own marriage he pro- 
vided a home for her. 

September 5, 1901, Mr. Cannon married Maude 
Bartlett, who was born in Milford Township and 
was educated in the Milford schools. For a year 
after his marriage Mr. Cannon conducted a livery 
business in South Milford and then followed farm- 
ing, was clerk in a hardware house and did other 
things. He owns 120 acres of land in Milford 
Township. He bought the hotel at South Milford, 
and took its active management in 1918. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cannon have one son, Paul F., born 
November 16. 1908, and now attending the schools 
of South Milford. Mr. Cannon is a past noble 
grand of South Milford Lodge No. 610 of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, is past chief 
patriarch of the Encampment, and Mrs. Cannon 
is a member of the Rebekahs. She is active in 
church work as a Methodist and for a number of 
years has been a teacher in the Sunday School. 
Politically he is a member of the democratic party 
and is the present assessor of Milford Township. 

Elias Kline is one of the large land owners and 
successful farmers and stock men of Spencer Town- 
ship, DeKalb County. His home is two and three- 



quarters of a mile northwest of Spencerville. Mr. 
Kline has 160 acres of land and has his farm well 
irhproved and stocked with good grades of cattle, 
horses and hogs. 

He was born in Stark County, Ohio, December 24, 
1848, a son of Henry and Maria (Rudy) Kline. 
His parents were natives of Pennsylvania, were 
married in Ohio, and in the spring of 1866 came 
to Indiana and settled in Spencer Township. In 
1870 they located on the farm where they spent 
the rest of their lives. 

Elias Kline acquired his education in Stark 
County, Ohio, and was about twenty-two years old 
when he came to Indiana. In politics he has always 
been a republican. 

January i, 1900, Mr. Kline married Mary V. Cail- 
let. She was born in France June ig, 1866, a daugh- 
ter of John H. and Anna (Rich) Caillet. Her 
father died in the old country in 1871. Her mother 
brought her four children to the United States in 
1874, landing at New York in February and going 
from there to Canton, Ohio. She later married John 
Shontz. Of her eight children four died in France 
and the four now living are August, Frank, Mary 
and Justin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kline have one son, Vernon E., 
born April 3, 1902, now in the third year of high 
school. 

Fred H. Green. Doubtless as many and as im- 
portant a volume of business and civic interests at 
Ligonier revolve around the family name Green as 
are associated with any other one group of local 
citizens. The Green family during their long resi- 
dence in Noble County has been active as business 
men, farmers and bankers, and many of the impor- 
tant public offices have also been held by them. 

Fred H. Green, of this family, is perhaps best 
known as the president of the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Trust Company of Ligonier, the office which 
he has held since the organization of that institution. 
This bank was organized in 1906. He was born in 
Ligioner, Indiana, June 18, 1862, the oldest son of 
Henry and Magdalena (Kaul) Green. His parents 
were both natives of Germany, and his father came 
to the United States at the age of sixteen, his 
mother at nineteen. When his father, Henry Green, 
first came to this country he came to Massillon, Ohio, 
and stayed with his uncle, who at that time owned 
a farm near that city and who later came to Noble 
County, Indiana, and bought a farm west of the 
City of Ligonier. After staying with his uncle at 
Massillon for a short period he then went to Cairo, 
Illinois, and later became a Mississippi River steam- 
boatman, running from Cairo down the river to 
New Orleans. He then went to Washington, D. C, 
and was employed as a foreman in a packing house, 
which business he had taken up while in Germany. 
After staying there a short time he then went to 
Jefferson City, Missouri, and engaged in a meat busi- 
ness for himself and while there, in the year 1861, 
he was married to Miss Magdalena Kaul. During the 
Civil war he furnished meat for both the Northern 
and Southern armies. Being in communication with 
his uncle, who insisted on his coming to Indiana, 
he did so and while here made his first purchase of 
100 acres of heavily wooded land west of town and 
later moved from Jefferson City, Missouri, to the 
Town of Ligonier and spent one year on the farm. 
He then engaged in business in Ligonier, and his 
first associate was Fred Mackley, and they together 
ran a meat market and bought live stock and were 
widely known throughout this section of the coun- 
try. He conducted an active business until his 
death, which accurred in 1900. He was also among 



HISTORY OF NORTHEAST INDIANA 



145 



the leading men of affairs in Noble County, Indiana. 
Politically he was a democrat, a member of the 
Masonic and the Odd Fellows lodges, and he and 
his wife were active Lutherans. Henry Green was 
survived by three sons, all of whom were born here 
and well known and prominent business men of 
Ligonier, Indiana, named Frederick H., John H. 
and Harry, who are at present connected with the 
Farmers and Merchants Trust Company, and are 
in the real estate business in the partnership of 
Green Brothers and Oldfather, which firm deals 
exclusively in high grade farms and are buyers of 
timber as well as other commodities. The Green 
Brothers still operate large farms and deal exten- 
sively in the stock business. 

Fred H. Green spent his boyhood days in Ligonier 
and attended public school until he was twelve years 
old. He early became associated with his father 
in business, and later on his two other brothers en- 
tered the business of his father and the firm became 
known as H. Green and Sons, and was widely known 
throughout this section of the country, as they were 
among the heaviest dealers in live stock as well as 
timber and other business pursuits. The extensive 
property interests of the Green family are still con- 
ducted under the name of H. Green and Sons. On 
February 17, i8g8, Fred H. Green married Hattie 
B. Hays, a daughter of W. D. and Harriett E. Hays. 
W. D. Hays was widely known in this section of 
the country and was a man who held many offices of 
trust. Hattie B. Hays was born on a farm which 
is now known as the Willow Spring Farm, where 
she spent her early childhood days, and later on 
she attended the high school at Ligonier and finished 
her education with a college course at Oberlin, Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Green were the parents of four chil- 
dren. \\'illiam H., the oldest, is a graduate of the 
Ligonier High School and of the University of Wis- 
consin, and is now managing the Willow Spring 
Dairy Farm one-half mile northeast of Ligonier, 
on which his mother was born. Frederick H., the 
second child, died in infancy. George E., the third 
son, is also a graduate of the Ligonier High School, 
as well as the University of Wisconsin, and served 
with the American Expeditionary Forces in France. 
Magdalena, the only daughter, is the youngest of 
the family. 

The Green family are active members in the United 
Brethren Church, of which Mr. Green is one of the